Editors' Picks A selection of stories handpicked by NPR Music editors.

Editors' Picks

"The stuff that used to ring true still does in a way and also doesn't anymore," says Phil Elverum. "The big, huge question I tried to think about with this giant song was mainly how to encompass these contradictions." Katy Hancock/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Katy Hancock/Courtesy of the artist

Belinda Carlisle of The Go-Go's. She says at live shows, the band was "a runaway train that could crash at any minute, and I think that's what people respond to." Theresa Kereakes/NPR hide caption

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Theresa Kereakes/NPR
Joelle Avelino for NPR

Briana Younger And Rodney Carmichael On All Things Considered

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Families are still seeking the musical instruments and other items stolen by the Nazis. Cornelia Li for NPR hide caption

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Cornelia Li for NPR

Where Are The Thousands Of Nazi-Looted Musical Instruments?

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Fans sit under an umbrella as shade from the hot sun during the Newport Jazz Festival in Newport, R.I., on July 8, 1962. Boston Globe/Getty Images hide caption

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Boston Globe/Getty Images

The Golden Age: A Newport Jazz Festival Special

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A parking lot in Nashville, photographed on Mar. 31, 2020, after Tennessee's governor issued a stay-at-home order in response to the developing coronavirus crisis. Danielle Del Valle/Getty Images hide caption

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Danielle Del Valle/Getty Images

A drawing of composer William Dawson in 1935 by Aaron Douglas. Dawson's Negro Folk Symphony, long neglected, has received a new recording. Aaron Douglas/Tuskegee University Archives hide caption

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Aaron Douglas/Tuskegee University Archives

Someone Finally Remembered William Dawson's 'Negro Folk Symphony'

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Lil Baby performs during a Juneteenth voter registration rally on June 19, 2020 at Murphy Park Fairgrounds in Atlanta, Ga. One week earlier, he released "The Bigger Picture," a song protesting police brutality. Paras Griffin/Getty Images hide caption

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Paras Griffin/Getty Images

A fan of K-pop band BTS poses for photos against a backdrop featuring an image of the group's members in Seoul, South Korea, on Oct. 29, 2019. Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images

K-Pop's Digital 'Army' Musters To Meet The Moment, Baggage In Tow

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Colombian musician Juanes turns inward in music and conversation on this week's show. Omar Cruz/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Omar Cruz/Courtesy of the artist

Juanes Turns Inward

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