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Running and other moderate exercise can protect against lifestyle disease. A new study shows training for a marathon slows cardiovascular aging. RichVintage/Getty Images hide caption

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RichVintage/Getty Images

Ready For Your First Marathon? Training Can Cut Years Off Your Cardiovascular Age

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Making art is fun. But there's a lot more to it. It might serve an evolutionary purpose — and emerging research shows that it can help us feel happy and relaxed. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Declines in smoking contributed to a drop in lung cancer death rates that helped drive down overall cancer death rates in the U.S., according to the latest analysis of trends by the American Cancer Society. VIEW press/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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VIEW press/Corbis via Getty Images

Progress On Lung Cancer Drives Historic Drop In U.S. Cancer Death Rate

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Malaka Gharib/NPR

Making Art Is Good For Your Health. Here's How To Start A Habit

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In a new book The Joy of Movement: How Exercise Helps Us Find Happiness, Hope, Connection, and Courage, author Kelly McGonigal argues that we should look beyond weight loss to the many social and emotional benefits of exercise. Boris Austin/Getty Images hide caption

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Boris Austin/Getty Images

Scientists tested high-traffic areas of an airport to find out where germs are most likely to thrive. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

When Alexa Kasdan's sore throat lingered for more than a week, she went to her doctor. The doctor sent her throat swab and blood draw to an out-of-network lab for sophisticated DNA tests, resulting in a $28,395.50 bill. Shelby Knowles for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Shelby Knowles for Kaiser Health News

For Her Head Cold, Insurer Coughed Up $25,865

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The CDC is still trying to understand the mechanism by which Vitamin E acetate, an additive in some vapes, injures lung tissue. It may interfere with a natural fluid in the lung called surfactant, which helps make lung tissue stretchy. Or a byproduct may be a toxic chemical. Jelacic Valentina/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Jelacic Valentina/EyeEm/Getty Images

It's still pretty early in the flu season, but some states, including Texas and North Carolina, are already reporting the first influenza deaths, including at least 10 children. Most kids each year who die from the flu had not been vaccinated. SDI Productions/Getty Images hide caption

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SDI Productions/Getty Images

Russell Ledet, a second-year medical student (top row, third from left) organized an outing for 14 of his fellow African American classmates to a former plantation that had slave quarters. Ledet says he would caption this photo "Our Moment of Resiliency." Brian Washington Jr. hide caption

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Brian Washington Jr.

Scientists Reach Out To Minority Communities To Diversify Alzheimer's Studies

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Using e-cigarettes doesn't seem to be as risky as smoking tobacco. But both activities can cause long-term lung problems, research finds — and the effect seems to be additive for people who do both. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Vaping Nicotine Linked To Increased Risk Of Chronic Lung Disease

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A study finds some evidence that a cancer drug, nilotinib, may help people with Parkinson's disease, a nervous system disorder that causes movement problems. It possibly works by raising levels of dopamine, the brain chemical that is lacking in people with the disease. GJLP/Science Source hide caption

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GJLP/Science Source

A Cancer Drug For Parkinson's? New Study Raises Hope, Draws Criticism

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Students in Alice Henshaw's Wilderness Medical Associates CPR training courses can practice on a Womanikin, designed to help trainees understand that compressions should be performed the same way on women's bodies as men's. Alice Henshaw hide caption

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Alice Henshaw

Years ago, Portia Smith (center) was afraid to seek care for her postpartum depression because she feared child welfare involvement. She and her daughters Shanell Smith (right), 19, and Najai Jones Smith (left), 15, pose for a selfie in February after makeup artist Najai made up everyone as they were getting ready at home to go to a movie together. Tom Gralish/Philadelphia Inquirer hide caption

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Tom Gralish/Philadelphia Inquirer

Black Mothers Get Less Treatment For Their Postpartum Depression

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We're tethered to our brothers and sisters as adults far longer than we are as children; our sibling relationships, in fact, are the longest-lasting family ties we have. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

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Katherine Streeter for NPR