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A Travel Ban To Contain The Coronavirus Could Worsen Conditions In Wuhan

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Roughly 1 in 10 infants were born prematurely in the U.S. in 2018, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The drug Makena is widely prescribed to women at high risk of going into labor early, though the latest research suggests the medicine doesn't work. Luis Davilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Davilla/Getty Images

The Doomsday Clock reads 100 seconds to midnight, a decision made by the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists that was announced Thursday. The clock is intended to represent the danger of global catastrophe. Eva Hambach/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Hambach/AFP via Getty Images

Why are some warnings heard, while others are ignored? Angela Hsieh hide caption

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Angela Hsieh

How To See The Future (No Crystal Ball Needed)

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This chicken from Memphis Meats was produced with cells taken from an animal and grown into meat in a "cultivator." The process is analogous to how yeast is grown in breweries to produce beer. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Allison Aubrey/NPR

H5N1 bird flu virus is the sort of virus under discussion this week in Bethesda, Md. How animal viruses can acquire the ability to jump into humans and quickly move from person to person is exactly the question that some researchers are trying to answer by manipulating pathogens in the lab. SPL/Dr. Klaus Boller/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Dr. Klaus Boller/Science Source

How Much Should The Public Be Told About Research Into Risky Viruses?

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NASA Taps Snowstorm-Chasing Team To Improve Forecasting

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Generics may not have the same cost-lowering power for specialty medicines, such as multiple sclerosis drugs, researchers find. That's true especially when other brand-name drugs are approved to treat a given disease before the first generic is approved. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Assessing The Injuries After Iranian Missile Attack

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Levi Draheim, 11, wears a dust mask as he participates in a demonstration in Miami in July 2019. A lawsuit filed by him and other young people urging action against climate change was thrown out by a federal appeals court Friday. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

Kids' Climate Case 'Reluctantly' Dismissed By Appeals Court

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A team of Stanford University researchers designed the PigeonBot. Lentink Lab/Stanford University hide caption

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Lentink Lab/Stanford University

'PigeonBot' Brings Robots Closer To Birdlike Flight

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Scientists put several litters of wolf puppies through a standard battery of tests. Many pups, such as this one named Flea, wouldn't fetch a ball. But then something surprising happened. Christina Hansen Wheat hide caption

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Christina Hansen Wheat

Fetching With Wolves: What It Means That A Wolf Puppy Will Retrieve A Ball

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The mouse on the right has been engineered to have four times the muscle mass of a normal lab mouse. Se-Jin Lee/PLOS One hide caption

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Se-Jin Lee/PLOS One

Scientists Sent Mighty Mice To Space To Improve Treatments Back On Earth

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