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CRISPR technology already allows scientists to make very precise modifications to DNA, and it could revolutionize how doctors prevent and treat many diseases. But using it to create gene-edited babies is still widely considered unethical. Gregor Fischer/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Gregor Fischer/picture alliance via Getty Images

A Russian Biologist Wants To Create More Gene-Edited Babies

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Researchers dropped more than 17,000 wallets with varying amounts of money in countries around the world. Here, an example of the wallets that held the most money. Christian Zünd hide caption

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Christian Zünd

What Dropping 17,000 Wallets Around The Globe Can Teach Us About Honesty

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erhui1979/Getty Images

There's More To Look Forward To After Peaking Professionally

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This oblique view of the Himalayan landscape was captured by a KH-9 Hexagon satellite on Dec. 20, 1975, on the border between eastern Nepal and Sikkim, India. Josh Maurer/LDEO hide caption

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Josh Maurer/LDEO

I Spy, Via Spy Satellite: Melting Himalayan Glaciers

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The Environmental Protection Agency's final version of its Affordable Clean Energy rule is supported by the coal industry, but it's not clear that it will be enough to stop more coal-fired power plants from closing. J. David Ake/AP hide caption

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J. David Ake/AP

Trump Administration Weakens Climate Plan To Help Coal Plants Stay Open

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Boaty McBoatface, an autonomous submarine vehicle, had a successful first mission taking measurements deep in the Southern Ocean. Povl Abrahamsen, British Antarctic Survey hide caption

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Povl Abrahamsen, British Antarctic Survey

Hal Herzog, a professor of psychology at Western Carolina University, says the more we attribute humanlike qualities to animals, the more ethically problematic it may be to keep them as pets. Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

Pets, Pests And Food: Our Complex, Contradictory Attitudes Toward Animals

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Geriatrics is a specialty that should adapt and change with each patient, says physician and author Louise Aronson. "I need to be a different sort of doctor for people at different ages and phases of old age." Robert Lang Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Lang Photography/Getty Images

A Clearer Map For Aging: 'Elderhood' Shows How Geriatricians Help Seniors Thrive

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Anne Schauer-Gimenez (from left) Allison Pieja and Molly Morse of Mango Materials stand next to the biopolymer fermenter at a sewage treatment plant next to San Francisco Bay. The fermenter feeds bacteria the methane they need to produce a biological form of plastic. Chris Joyce/NPR hide caption

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Chris Joyce/NPR

Replacing Plastic: Can Bacteria Help Us Break The Habit?

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Scientists exhumed 10 wooden braziers from eight tombs at the ancient Jirzankal Cemetery in what is now western China. Many of the braziers held stones that were apparently heated and used to burn cannabis plants. Xinhua Wu/Science Advances hide caption

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Xinhua Wu/Science Advances

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine (from left), Sen. Ted Cruz, D.C. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson and Margot Lee Shetterly, author of the book Hidden Figures, unveil the Hidden Figures Way street sign at a dedication ceremony on Wednesday in Washington, D.C. NASA/Joel Kowsky hide caption

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NASA/Joel Kowsky

Drug agents last fall worked with a Minneapolis police SWAT team to seize just under 171 pounds of methamphetamine. Many U.S. states say they face an escalating problem with meth and drugs other than opioids. Cannon River Drug and Violent Task Force/AP hide caption

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Cannon River Drug and Violent Task Force/AP

Federal Grants Restricted To Fighting Opioids Miss The Mark, States Say

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Processed meats, including hot dogs and bacon, cook in a frying pan. A new study of 80,000 people finds that those who ate the most red meat — especially processed meats such as bacon and hot dogs — had a higher risk of premature death compared with those who cut back. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images