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Naked mole rats are eusocial, which means they live all crowded together, in a colony underground. Gregory G Dimijian/Getty Images/Science Source hide caption

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Gregory G Dimijian/Getty Images/Science Source

Astrocyte cells like these from the brain of a mouse may differ subtly from those in a human brain. David Robertson, ICR/Science Photo Library/Science Source hide caption

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David Robertson, ICR/Science Photo Library/Science Source

Subtle Differences In Brain Cells Hint at Why Many Drugs Help Mice But Not People

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A pile of debris including all kinds of plastics grows hourly at Omni Recycling, a materials recovery facility in Pitman, N.J. Plastic bags are especially problematic because they can get caught in the conveyor belts and equipment and gum up the recycling process. Rebecca Davis/NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Davis/NPR

More U.S. Towns Are Feeling The Pinch As Recycling Becomes Costlier

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Trash sent for recycling moves along a conveyor belt to be sorted at Waste Management's material recovery facility in Elkridge, Md. In 2018, China announced it would no longer buy most plastic waste from places like the United States. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Recycling Industry Is Struggling To Figure Out A Future Without China

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A 15-year-old in Cambridge, Mass., shows off her vaping device in 2018. Schools and health officials across the U.S. are struggling to curb what they say is an epidemic of underage vaping. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP
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Jill Heinerth says Dan's Cave on Abaco Island, Bahamas, is her "favorite cave on Earth." Jill Heinerth/Ecco hide caption

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Jill Heinerth/Ecco

Cave Diver Risks All To Explore Places 'Where Nobody Has Ever Been'

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A study conducted in six Canadian cities found a link between maternal consumption of fluoride during pregnancy and intelligence of their offspring. vitapix/Getty Images hide caption

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vitapix/Getty Images

Can Maternal Fluoride Consumption During Pregnancy Lower Children's Intelligence?

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Scientists are using statistics, history and computer modeling to understand exactly how much hotter the oceans are today than they were before industrialization. Harvard researchers just found a clue in shipping records digitized after World War II. Suomi NPP — VIIRS/NASA Earth Observatory hide caption

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Suomi NPP — VIIRS/NASA Earth Observatory

How Much Hotter Are The Oceans? The Answer Begins With A Bucket

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Though not the same as actually jumping into the waves, a virtual reality program like this one that let a headset-wearing patient "swim with dolphins" was enough of an immersive distraction to significantly reduce pain, a study found. Courtesy of Cedars Sinai/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Courtesy of Cedars Sinai/Screenshot by NPR

Got Pain? A Virtual Swim With Dolphins May Help Melt It Away

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Mahmee CEO Melissa Hanna (right) and her mother, Linda Hanna (left), co-founded the company in 2014. Linda's more than 40 years of clinical experience as a registered nurse and certified lactation consultant helped them understand the need, they say. Keith Alcantara/Mahmee hide caption

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Keith Alcantara/Mahmee

This App Aims To Save New Moms' Lives

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Denise Herzing on the TED stage. James Duncan Davidson / TED hide caption

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James Duncan Davidson / TED

Denise Herzing: Do Dolphins Have A Language?

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Barbara King Bret Hartman/Bret Hartman / TED hide caption

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Bret Hartman/Bret Hartman / TED

Barbara King: Do Animals Grieve?

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A Colombian worker checks the plastic protection cover over a banana bunch on a plantation in Aracataca, Colombia. A dreaded fungus that has destroyed banana plantations in Asia has now spread to Latin America. Jan Sochor/LatinContent via Getty Images hide caption

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Jan Sochor/LatinContent via Getty Images

Devastating Banana Fungus Arrives In Colombia, Threatening The Fruit's Future

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A Harvard research team's prototype of a portable exosuit is made of cloth components worn at the waist and thighs. A computer that's built into the shorts uses an algorithm that can sense when the user shifts between a walking gait and a running gait. Wyss Institute at Harvard University hide caption

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Wyss Institute at Harvard University

These Experimental Shorts Are An 'Exosuit' That Boosts Endurance On The Trail

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Cows graze on a grass field at a farm in Schaghticoke, N.Y. The grass-fed movement is based on the idea of regenerative agriculture. John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images

A bald eagle prepares to take off from a pine tree in Pembroke Pines, Fla. The eagle population rebounded after protections put in place under the Endangered Species Act. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

Health workers in protective suits tend to an Ebola victim kept in an isolation cube in Beni in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Jerome Delay/AP hide caption

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Jerome Delay/AP

2 Experimental Ebola Drugs Saved Lives In Congo Outbreak

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