Science The latest health and science news. Updates on medicine, healthy living, nutrition, drugs, diet, and advances in science and technology. Subscribe to the Health & Science podcast.

Science

CRISPR gene-editing technology allows scientists to make highly precise modifications to DNA. The technology is now starting to be used in human trials to treat several diseases in the U.S. Molekuul/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

toggle caption
Molekuul/Getty Images/Science Photo Library

First U.S. Patients Treated With CRISPR As Human Gene-Editing Trials Get Underway

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/712402435/714091334" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A team of researchers found a surprisingly large amount of microplastic in the air in the Pyrenees mountains in southern France. VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images

Microplastic Found Even In The Air In France's Pyrenees Mountains

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/713561484/713799040" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Gentoo penguins sit on an Antarctic iceberg in a scene from the new Netflix nature documentary series Our Planet. Sophie Lanfear/Silverback/Netflix hide caption

toggle caption
Sophie Lanfear/Silverback/Netflix

'Our Planet' Nature Documentary Addresses The 800-Pound Gorilla — Human Impact

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/713585983/713616971" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Courtesy of Pottermore.com

South Korean President Park Geun-hye walks past a NASA logo during a tour at the agency's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick Semansky/AP

Do You Love Lying In Bed? Get Paid By NASA To Do It For Space Research

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/713303712/713304198" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The trick, of course, is to find moments of deep relaxation wherever you are, not just on vacation. Laughing with friends can be another way to start breaking the cycle of chronic stress and help keep your heart healthy, too. stock_colors/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
stock_colors/Getty Images

High Stress Drives Up Your Risk Of A Heart Attack. Here's How To Chill Out

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/711921685/713388015" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A bowl of Honey Toasted Kernza. General Mills made 6,000 boxes of the cereal and is passing them out to spread the word about perennial grains. Olivia Sun/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Olivia Sun/NPR

Can This Breakfast Cereal Help Save The Planet?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/711144729/712997100" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ketamine appears to restore faulty connections between brain cells, according to research performed in mice. Kevin Link/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Link/Science Source

Ketamine May Relieve Depression By Repairing Damaged Brain Circuits

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/712295937/712409247" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

These Palmer amaranth — or pigweed — plants, seen growing in a greenhouse at Kansas State University, appear to be resistant to multiple herbicides. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Dan Charles/NPR

As Weeds Outsmart The Latest Weedkillers, Farmers Are Running Out Of Easy Options

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/710229186/712116750" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The pronounced curve of this toe bone — the proximal phalanx — from a specimen of Homo luzonensis, an early human found in a Philippine cave, looks more like it came from tree-climbing Australopithecus than from a modern human, scientists say. Callao Cave Archaeology Project hide caption

toggle caption
Callao Cave Archaeology Project

Ancient Bones And Teeth Found In A Philippine Cave May Rewrite Human History

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/710278943/711952003" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The first-ever image of a black hole was released Wednesday by a consortium of researchers, showing the "black hole at the center of galaxy M87, outlined by emission from hot gas swirling around it under the influence of strong gravity near its event horizon." Event Horizon Telescope collaboration et al hide caption

toggle caption
Event Horizon Telescope collaboration et al

The North American porcupine has a cute face, but it has upward of 30,000 menacing quills covering much of its body. The slow-moving herbivore uses them as a last-resort defense against predators. Lindsay Wildlife Experience hide caption

toggle caption
Lindsay Wildlife Experience

Protesters gather outside the White House June 1, 2017, to protest President Trump's decision to withdraw the Unites States from the Paris climate change accord. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Susan Walsh/AP

'Losing Earth' Explores How Oil Industry Played Politics With The Planet's Fate

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/710992579/711122892" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

George Berzsenyi mentored thousands of high school students in mathematics. Sara Stathas for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Sara Stathas for NPR

A Math Teacher's Life Summed Up By The Gifted Students He Mentored

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/707326070/710781542" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript