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Bathrooms remain a key issue for employers and for coworkers who don't feel comfortable sharing bathrooms with transgender people, says Mark Marsen, a human resources director. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

He, She, They: Workplaces Adjust As Gender Identity Norms Change

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Goldfish, like these showcased at Tokyo's Nihonbashi Art Aquarium, have been bred in China over centuries, into forms so varied and rare that one can be worth hundreds of dollars. Toshifumi Kitamura/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Toshifumi Kitamura/AFP/Getty Images

The Goldfish Tariff: Fancy Pet Fish Among The Stranger Casualties Of The Trade War

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Companies are increasingly concerned about how Earth's changing climate might impact their businesses, such as crop failures from drought, heat and storms. Julian Stratenschulte/picture alliance via Getty Image hide caption

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Julian Stratenschulte/picture alliance via Getty Image

As The Climate Warms, Companies Are Scrambling To Calculate The Risk To Their Profits

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A wall inside the CIA headquarters honors members of the CIA who died in the service of their country. Larry Downing/Sygma via Getty Images hide caption

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Larry Downing/Sygma via Getty Images

The War On Terror, Through The Eyes Of 3 Women At The CIA

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Donny Chan reads in his apartment, one of a growing number of tiny, upscale units known as "microflats" in Hong Kong. The apartments, dubbed "mosquito-size units" or "gnat flats" in Chinese are drawing online ridicule and underscore worries over the Asian financial hub's overheated real estate market and widening inequality. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam, center, arrives amid protests as she prepares to deliver her policies at the chamber of the Legislative Council in Hong Kong, on Wednesday. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren looks on as South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg speaks during Tuesday's Democratic presidential debate. Warren's policy positions were described as unrealistic and expensive by her rivals in the Democratic debate. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Democratic presidential hopeful Mayor Pete Buttigieg looks on as former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke speaks during the fourth Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign season on Tuesday. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Kathleen Kraninger is director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, an agency that was thwarted by the U.S. Department of Education from examining problems with a troubled student loan forgiveness program. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Exclusive: Turf War Blocked CFPB From Helping Fix Student Loan Forgiveness Program

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Deputy Assistant Secretary of State George Kent leaves Capitol Hill in Washington on Tuesday after testifying before congressional lawmakers as part of the House impeachment inquiry. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Former White House adviser on Russia Fiona Hill leaves the Capitol on Monday after testifying before lawmakers as part of the House impeachment inquiry into President Trump. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP