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U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos testifies before the Senate education committee on March 28. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Betsy DeVos Overruled Education Dept. Findings On Defrauded Student Borrowers

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The first panels of levee border wall are seen at a construction site along the U.S.-Mexico border last month in Donna, Texas. The new section, with 18-foot-tall steel bollards atop a concrete wall, will stretch approximately 8 miles. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Attorney Charles Cooper, representing former national security aide Charles Kupperman (center) departs federal court in Washington in October. On Tuesday, Cooper asked a federal court to keep alive a lawsuit centered on a now-withdrawn subpoena filed by House Democrats that sought Kupperman's testimony as part of the impeachment inquiry. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Officials announced they would suspend training for Saudi Arabian military pilots after the fatal shootings last week at the Pensacola Naval Air Station. Josh Brasted/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Brasted/Getty Images

Kehinde Wiley's statue Rumors of War spent several weeks at New York's Times Square in late September. The work was unveiled Tuesday in Richmond as a permanent installation. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Bebeto Matthews/AP

Genaro Garcia Luna delivers a speech in 2012 to mark the expansion of a federal prison. He served as Secretary of Public Security from 2006 to 2012. Alexandre Meneghini/AP hide caption

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Alexandre Meneghini/AP

Police arrive at the scene of a shooting in Jersey City, N.J., Tuesday. There were two separate shooting incidents beginning at Bayview Cemetery and then later at a kosher market. Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images

The FTC said the University of Phoenix's ads sought to mislead prospective students by suggesting the school had close ties to Twitter, MGM and other large companies. University of Phoenix via FTC hide caption

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University of Phoenix via FTC

Frontier Airlines jetliners sit at gates on the A concourse at Denver International Airport. Lawsuits filed on Tuesday accuse the airline of discriminating against pregnant and nursing women. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

Flight Attendants, Pilots Say Frontier Discriminated Against New Moms

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Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis says federal laws that allow foreign nationals to buy guns in the U.S. should be reviewed after a Saudi gunman carried out a mass shooting in Pensacola, Fla. DeSantis says, "The Second Amendment is so that we the American people can keep and bear arms. It does not apply to Saudi Arabians." Brendan Farrington/AP hide caption

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Brendan Farrington/AP

Pete Frates, (seated, center) participates in the Ice Bucket Challenge with Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker to raise money for ALS research at the Statehouse in Boston in 2015. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Jenni Grover holds a collection of finished patches from a quilt created by more than 100 volunteers across the country. The plans for the quilt were discovered at the estate sale of 99-year-old Rita Smith, who died earlier this year. Several dozen volunteers gathered to help put the pieces together at the Wishcraft Workshop in Chicago on Dec. 7. Manuel Martinez/WBEZ hide caption

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Manuel Martinez/WBEZ

Quilters Across The U.S. Answer Call To Help Sew Up Unfinished Project

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A federal appeals court on Monday heard arguments in a lawsuit filed by more than 200 Democratic lawmakers. The suit claims that President Trump violated the Constitution by not seeking congressional approval for his overseas private business dealings. Mark Tenally/AP hide caption

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Mark Tenally/AP

Federal Reserve Board Chairman Paul Volcker listens to a question as he appears before the Senate Banking Committee in Washington, D.C., in 1980. Chick Harrity/AP hide caption

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Chick Harrity/AP

Former Fed Chairman Paul Volcker Dies At 92

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