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The Asheville, N.C., city council unanimously approved a resolution apologizing for the local government's historic role in slavery and for participating in racist and discriminatory policies that have led to the oppression of African Americans. Walter Bibikow/Getty Images hide caption

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Walter Bibikow/Getty Images

The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City has been closed since mid-March, but will be open to visitors five days a week starting in August. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Chelsea business owners hope the reopening of the popular elevated park will bring more foot traffic back to the neighborhood. Drew Angerer / Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer / Getty Images

New York City's High Line Reopens In A Potential Boost To Local Business

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Twitter says it is investigating the coordinated hack, which attacked the accounts of some of the richest and most popular names on the social media platform. Alastair Pike/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alastair Pike/AFP via Getty Images

Twitter Says It Was The Victim Of A 'Coordinated Social Engineering Attack'

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The Pentagon will take immediate steps to begin addressing discrimination in the armed forces, U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper said Wednesday. U.S. Army troops are seen here in Texas along the U.S.-Mexico border in November 2018. Tamir Kalifa/Getty Images hide caption

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Tamir Kalifa/Getty Images

People wearing masks and gloves wait to enter a Walmart on April 17 in Uniondale, New York. Walmart announced they will require customers to wear masks beginning next week, becoming the largest retailer to instate a mask mandate in the United States. Al Bello/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Bello/Getty Images

There's No Untangling The Pandemic From The Economy

A lot of Americans are having trouble getting a coronavirus test. If they do get one, they may have to wait more than a week for results.

There's No Untangling The Pandemic From The Economy

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The Kaiser Permanente float was one of many participating in the 131st Rose Parade in Pasadena, Calif., in January. Organizers have canceled the 2021 event, citing health and safety risks associated with the coronavirus pandemic. Michael Owen Baker/AP hide caption

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Michael Owen Baker/AP

A display of Mary Trump's new book about her uncle. A judge freed President Trump's niece this week from a restraining order restricting her from discussing the book. Stephanie Keith/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephanie Keith/Getty Images

Mary Trump Describes Abusive Trump Family Home, Says She Will Vote For Biden

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Graffiti on a wall on La Brea Ave. in Los Angeles, Calif. asking for rent forgiveness in May. This week, the city of Los Angeles rolled out a renters relief program to provide more than $100 million in assistance. Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images

Los Angeles Launches $103 Million Program To Offer Relief To Renters

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Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) students gather in front of the Supreme Court in Washington on June 18. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Despite Supreme Court's Ruling On DACA, Trump Administration Rejects New Applicants

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A woman walks past a closed restaurant this week in Miami Beach, Fla., during the coronavirus pandemic. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

The Trump administration is requiring hospitals to report COVID-19 data to a new system, sidestepping the CDC. David Degner/Getty Images hide caption

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David Degner/Getty Images

White House Strips CDC Of Data Collection Role For COVID-19 Hospitalizations

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Kelly Loeffler (left), with Mary Brock, cheers the Atlanta Dream on courtside during a 2011 game. Now a senator, Loeffler faces a political challenge over her stake in the WNBA franchise in a tough election race. David Tulis/AP hide caption

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David Tulis/AP

The National Academy of Sciences report includes an updated review of the evidence from around the world and a set of recommendations on mitigation strategies for the coronavirus in school settings. Malte Mueller/Getty Images/fStop hide caption

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Malte Mueller/Getty Images/fStop