National Security National Security

National Security

Edward Snowden appears on a live video feed broadcast from Moscow at an event sponsored by the ACLU Hawaii in Honolulu on Feb. 14, 2015. Marco Garcia/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Marco Garcia/AP

Edward Snowden Tells NPR: The Executive Branch 'Sort Of Hacked The Constitution'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/760121373/760780884" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Trump, seen speaking to reporters at the White House on Monday, has fired his national security adviser. With John Bolton gone, what does that mean for Afghanistan peace talks and other major foreign policy? Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Win McNamee/Getty Images

An NPR investigation finds that the military court and prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, have cost taxpayers billions of dollars, with billions more expected. The war court headquarters at Camp Justice, as seen through a broken window at an obsolete air hangar at the U.S. Navy base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, on February 28, 2015. Emily Michot//Miami Herald/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Emily Michot//Miami Herald/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

Guantánamo Has Cost Billions; Whistleblower Alleges 'Gross' Waste

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/759523615/759899492" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The headquarters of the military intelligence agency GRU in Moscow. The FBI and other U.S. agencies want to stop more interference like that launched from here against the U.S. in 2016. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Pavel Golovkin/AP

With Next Goal To Secure 2020 Elections, Feds Seek To Absorb Lessons From 2016

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/759100352/759170055" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Many Afghans approve of President Trump's decision to quash a potential deal with the Taliban. Here, security forces guard a street in Kabul last week after a suicide car bombing rocked the capital's diplomatic enclave. Sayed Khodaberdi Sadat/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sayed Khodaberdi Sadat/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

In Afghanistan, A Mix Of Surprise And Relief After Trump Cancels Taliban Talks

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/759089560/759097623" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

CIA chemist Sidney Gottlieb headed up the agency's secret MK-ULTRA program, which was charged with developing a mind control drug that could be weaponized against enemies. Courtesy of the CIA hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of the CIA

The CIA's Secret Quest For Mind Control: Torture, LSD And A 'Poisoner In Chief'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/758989641/759111013" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Donald Trump during a press conference at his Turnberry golf resort in Scotland in 2016 before becoming president. The U.S. Air Force confirms it's investigating claims that aircrews violated internal rules by staying at the resort. Trump says he had no knowledge of the stopovers. Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images

Chinese military delegates arrive for the National People's Congress in Beijing last March. The growing friction between the U.S. and China, combined with the rapid rise of China's economy and its military, has stirred a debate about whether the U.S. and China are headed toward a Cold War. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ng Han Guan/AP

Are The U.S. And China Headed For A Cold War?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/747238523/758943533" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The U.S. has spent hundreds of millions of dollars since 2016 to make election practices at every level of government more secure. Mark Ralston /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Ralston /AFP/Getty Images

This image tweeted by President Trump is believed to have come from a highly classified U.S. reconnaissance satellite known as USA 224. Donald J. Trump Twitter account via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Donald J. Trump Twitter account via AP

Can President Trump Really Tweet A Highly Classified Satellite Photo? Yep, He Can

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/758038714/758043848" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Facebook confirmed that it met with other tech companies and U.S. national security officials to discuss aligning efforts to safeguard the 2020 presidential election. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Sakuma/AP

Workers break ground on new border wall construction about 20 miles west of Santa Teresa, N.M., last month. The Trump administration has started the arduous process of canceling $3.6 billion in military construction projects to fund its plans to build more of a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Cedar Attanasio/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Cedar Attanasio/AP

Attendees in Bucks County, Pa. test-drove new voting machines at an event aimed at helping the county decide which equipment to buy. Security is a major focus in the 2020 presidential race. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Pam Fessler/NPR

States Upgrade Election Equipment — Wary Of 'A Race Without A Finish Line'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/756007555/757006291" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

James Mattis spent four decades in the Marines. He served as a commander in Afghanistan shortly after the al-Qaida attacks in 2001. Celeste Sloman for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Celeste Sloman for NPR

Jim Mattis: 'Nations With Allies Thrive, Nations Without Allies Wither'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/756681750/756713156" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript