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Protesters near Baghdad's Tahrir Square. The concrete barriers have been erected by security forces who are trying to prevent demonstrations from moving closer to Baghdad's fortified Green Zone. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

Iraq's Protests Shook The Government. Now The Movement Is Nearly Crushed

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People hand in their ID cards and receive voting papers at the Hoseyniyeh Ershad building in Tehran. Iran is holding important national elections Friday, choosing members of its parliament as well as its Assembly of Experts. Marjan Yazdi for NPR hide caption

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Marjan Yazdi for NPR

Iranians Vote In Parliamentary Election, After 1 Week Of Campaigning

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Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu plants a tree during a commemoration of the Jewish holiday of Tu BiShvat (New Year for Trees), in the Israeli settlement of Mevo'ot Yericho near the Palestinian city of Jericho in the Jordan Valley in the occupied West Bank. Menahem Kahana/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Menahem Kahana/AFP via Getty Images

Israel Is Eager To Annex West Bank Lands, But U.S. Says To Wait

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John Sopko, special inspector general for Afghanistan reconstruction, testifies before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee Tuesday. Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

Debris and rubble are seen at the site where an Iranian missile struck Ain al-Asad air base in Iraq's Anbar province in January. The U.S. has repeatedly raised its injury report from the strike; it now says 109 personnel suffered brain injuries. John Davison/Reuters hide caption

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John Davison/Reuters

An individual wearing an Afghan uniform opened fire on the combined U.S. and Afghan forces Saturday, killing two U.S. service members and injuring six others. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

Lebanese doctors take part in anti-government demonstrations in Beirut in November. Patrick Baz/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Baz/AFP via Getty Images

Amid Lebanon's Economic Crisis, The Country's Health Care System Is Ailing

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A reproduction of a combo of two pictures of Qassim al-Rimi, leader of al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, who was killed in a U.S. counterterrorism operation. Yemeni Ministry of Interior/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Yemeni Ministry of Interior/AFP via Getty Images

European Union foreign policy chief Josep Borrell, shown here during a news conference earlier this month, has expressed concerns about the Trump administration's proposal about how to end the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Francisco Seco/AP hide caption

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Francisco Seco/AP

Iranian judiciary spokesman Gholamhossein Esmaili says that an Iranian man named Amir Rahimpour will be executed for spying on behalf of the CIA and that the sentence and would be carried out soon. Hamed Ataei/Mizan News Agency via AP hide caption

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Hamed Ataei/Mizan News Agency via AP

A Turkish military convoy passes through the Syrian town of Dana, in Idlib province near the Turkish-Syrian border, on Sunday. It is there, in northwestern Syria, that friction between the country and neighboring Turkey has flared into direct violence. Aaref Watad/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Aaref Watad/AFP via Getty Images

Orthodox Jewish women are increasingly joining a custom called Daf Yomi, Hebrew for "daily page," which involves reading a page a day of the Talmud, a centuries-old, multivolume collection of rabbinic teachings, debates and interpretations of Judaism. Here women read the last pages of the cycle at their first women's mass Talmud celebration in Jerusalem in January. Tanya Habjouqa/NOOR for NPR hide caption

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Tanya Habjouqa/NOOR for NPR

Orthodox Jewish Women Take A New Lead In Talmud Study In Israel

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Mohammed Tawfiq Allawi, photographed in 2012, was named Iraq's next prime minister. Following his appointment on Saturday, Allawi made a show of support with the anti-government protest movement. Prashant Rao /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Prashant Rao /AFP via Getty Images

President Donald Trump applauds as Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks during Tuesday's announcement of the Trump administration's plan to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

The Iranian missile strikes earlier this month caused extensive damage at the Ain al-Asad air base, northwest of Baghdad. President Trump said immediately after the attack that there was "only minimum damage." Ayman Henna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ayman Henna/AFP via Getty Images

Palestinian demonstrators in Rafah, in the southern Gaza strip, hold portraits of President Trump and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during a protest against Trump's announcement of a peace plan on Tuesday. Said Khatib/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Said Khatib/AFP via Getty Images

Mortars hit a restaurant in the U.S. Embassy compound in Baghdad's Green Zone on Sunday night, according to Iraqi officials. The embassy is seen here earlier this month. Reuters hide caption

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Reuters

Mortar Attack Damages Part of U.S. Embassy Compound In Baghdad

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Volunteer medics clear the ruins of a medical tent near Tahrir Square in Baghdad on Saturday after security forces stormed the area. They said security forces set the tent on fire, burning everything in it, including medical supplies. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

Damage at the al-Asad military base in Iraq, days after a missile attack by Iran. The barrage was in retaliation for the U.S. killing of a top Iranian general in a drone strike in Baghdad on Jan. 3. Ayman Henna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ayman Henna/AFP via Getty Images