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Investigations

Jeanetta Churchill stands outside of her Baltimore row house. She says she has to keep her air running constantly in the summer in order to manage her bipolar disorder. Nora Eckert/NPR hide caption

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Nora Eckert/NPR

How High Heat Can Impact Mental Health

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A guard sits in his truck at the entrance to the Darby Coal Mine in Holmes Mill, Kentucky, on May 20, 2006 - the day an explosion in the mine killed five miners. The owners of the mine later failed to pay nearly $3 million in penalties for mine safety violations at Darby and other mines. Wade Payne/AP hide caption

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Wade Payne/AP

A luthier assembles the rosewood sides of a guitar at C.F. Martin & Co. in Nazareth, Pa. Instrument-makers and musicians will likely be able to transport instruments containing rosewood around the world without a burdensome permit process. Jacqueline Larma/AP hide caption

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Jacqueline Larma/AP

William Portwood, who died less than two weeks after NPR confirmed his involvement in the 1965 murder of Boston minister James Reeb, poses for a photograph in front of his home in Selma, Ala. Chip Brantley/NPR hide caption

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Chip Brantley/NPR

NPR Identifies 4th Attacker In Civil Rights-Era Cold Case

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Gary Hairston, a coal miner for 27 years, spoke at the hearing. He has been diagnosed with progressive massive fibrosis, the advanced stage of black lung disease. House Committee on Education and Labor hide caption

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House Committee on Education and Labor

A magazine's cover line in Beijing asks, "How will Trump the businessman change the world?" on Dec. 28, 2016, days after then President-elect Donald Trump tapped outspoken China critic Peter Navarro for a top trade position. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images

Inside The White House's Bitter Fight Over China

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Top government leaders told NPR that federal agencies are years behind where they could have been if Chinese cybertheft had been openly addressed earlier. Bill Hinton Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Hinton Photography/Getty Images

As China Hacked, U.S. Businesses Turned A Blind Eye

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West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice delivers his State of the State speech on Jan. 9 in Charleston, W.Va. Mining companies belonging to the Justice family owe millions in safety violations. Tyler Evert/AP hide caption

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Tyler Evert/AP

A boy rides his bike through still water after a thunderstorm in the Lakewood area of East Houston, which flooded during Hurricane Harvey. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

How Federal Disaster Money Favors The Rich

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Chicago resident Domitila Valerio started noticing her bill increasing in 2018. When the bills escalated to more than $700, she couldn't afford to pay. Michelle Kanaar for APM Reports hide caption

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Michelle Kanaar for APM Reports

A Water Crisis Is Growing In A Place You'd Least Expect It

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Respiratory therapist Deena Neace checks James Muncy's blood pressure and pulse during a therapy session at the New Beginnings Pulmonary Rehab Clinic in South Williamson, Ky. Muncy is one of thousands of coal miners across Appalachia who are dying of advanced black lung. Matthew Hatcher for NPR hide caption

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Matthew Hatcher for NPR

'I Figured It Was Going To Be A Horrible Death, And It Probably Will Be'

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"There's a lot of memories here, some good, some bad," says Smith, while reflecting on his years working at the now defunct Solid Energy mine in Pike County. Rich-Joseph Facun for NPR hide caption

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Rich-Joseph Facun for NPR

An Epidemic Is Killing Thousands Of Coal Miners. Regulators Could Have Stopped It

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In the photo above, dust circles a worker during the construction of the Hawks Nest Tunnel in 1930. Workers on the project were exposed to toxic levels of silica dust; hundreds ultimately died. Courtesy of Elkem Metals Collection, West Virginia State Archives hide caption

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Courtesy of Elkem Metals Collection, West Virginia State Archives

Before Black Lung, The Hawks Nest Tunnel Disaster Killed Hundreds

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Coal miner Nick Stiltner reviews an X-ray of his lungs showing black lung disease at the Stone Mountain Clinic in Grundy, Va. Courtesy of Elaine McMillion Sheldon/PBS Frontline hide caption

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Courtesy of Elaine McMillion Sheldon/PBS Frontline

Illinois Department of Corrections officers participate in a role-playing exercise during a March training session on working with female inmates, at Logan Correctional Center in Lincoln, Ill. Bill Healy for SJNN hide caption

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Bill Healy for SJNN

In Prison, Discipline Comes Down Hardest On Women

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Mary Kathleen "Kathy" Tyler, an 82-year-old woman incarcerated at Iowa Correctional Institution for Women in Mitchellville, was sentenced to life in prison in 1978. She is an avid reader, artist and pianist; is employed as a court reporter; and has accumulated a handful of degrees since she was incarcerated. Jessica Earnshaw for NPR hide caption

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Jessica Earnshaw for NPR

In Iowa, A Commitment To Make Prison Work Better For Women

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Rep. Bobby Scott, D-Va., shown in 2016, said Tuesday he will hold hearings next year in response to an NPR and Frontline probe that revealed that government regulators failed to identify and prevent dangerous conditions. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Using a mannequin to simulate dangerous scenarios, a team at Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center learns standard treatments for obstetric emergencies like hemorrhage. Bethany Mollenkof for NPR hide caption

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Bethany Mollenkof for NPR

To Keep Women From Dying In Childbirth, Look To California

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In central Appalachia, the black lung rate for working coal miners with at least 25 years experience underground is the highest it's been in a quarter century. Don Klumpp/Getty Images hide caption

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Don Klumpp/Getty Images