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Dozens of fans turned out to watch the Red Sox amateur baseball team tangle with the Yankees at Regions Field in Birmingham, Ala. The teams are part of an over-35 league showcasing their skills at a ballpark normally used by the Birmingham Barons minor league baseball team. Russell Lewis/NPR hide caption

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Russell Lewis/NPR

People in Melbourne, Australia, wearing face masks on Thursday. Victoria has recorded 317 new cases of coronavirus in 24 hours, the highest daily total recorded in the state since the pandemic began. Darrian Traynor/Getty Images hide caption

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Darrian Traynor/Getty Images

A dirt road cuts through a sprawling Doctors Without Borders camp in South Sudan. In a letter, 1,000 current and former employees are accusing the aid group of racism and white supremacy. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

People wearing masks and gloves wait to enter a Walmart on April 17 in Uniondale, New York. Walmart announced they will require customers to wear masks beginning next week, becoming the largest retailer to instate a mask mandate in the United States. Al Bello/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Bello/Getty Images

There's No Untangling The Pandemic From The Economy

A lot of Americans are having trouble getting a coronavirus test. If they do get one, they may have to wait more than a week for results.

There's No Untangling The Pandemic From The Economy

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Medical staff in Mumbai, India, last week. A U.N. report warns that the coronavirus pandemic is interfering with children getting vaccinated. Anshuman Poyrekar/Hindustan Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Anshuman Poyrekar/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

The Trump administration is requiring hospitals to report COVID-19 data to a new system, sidestepping the CDC. David Degner/Getty Images hide caption

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David Degner/Getty Images

White House Strips CDC Of Data Collection Role For COVID-19 Hospitalizations

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Marcelina Alvarez, a technician at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, administers an EKG to Israel Shippy to check the functioning of his heart. Fred Mogul/ WNYC hide caption

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Fred Mogul/ WNYC

Why Doctors Keep Monitoring Children Who Recover From Mysterious COVID-Linked Illness

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The National Academy of Sciences report includes an updated review of the evidence from around the world and a set of recommendations on mitigation strategies for the coronavirus in school settings. Malte Mueller/Getty Images/fStop hide caption

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Malte Mueller/Getty Images/fStop

A robot introduces itself to patients in Kigali, Rwanda. The robots, used in Rwanda's treatment centers, can screen people for COVID-19 and deliver food and medication, among other tasks. The robots were donated by the United Nations Development Program and the Rwanda Ministry of ICT and Innovation. Cyril Ndegeya/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Cyril Ndegeya/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

Though the pandemic has left us all less able to socialize in person with our close friends and community, we're still finding ways to use screens and other methods to connect and maintain relationships, research suggests. Janice Chang for NPR hide caption

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Janice Chang for NPR

Pictured in 2019, Okinawa Governor Denny Tamaki on Tuesday questioned U.S. measures to stop the coronavirus from spreading on the island. Behrouz Mehri/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Behrouz Mehri/AFP via Getty Images

Kimberley Chavez Lopez Byrd died after testing positive for coronavirus. Other teachers she worked with tested positive as well. "She was a very loving, very faithful person and she was very kind," says her colleague Jena Martinez-Inzunza. Luke Byrd hide caption

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Luke Byrd

A Teacher Who Contracted COVID-19 Cautions Against In-Person Schooling

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Adm. Brett Giroir, assistant secretary for health in the Department of Health and Human Services, adjusts his face mask while testifying this month before a House subcommittee on the coronavirus crisis. Kevin Lamarque/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Lamarque/Pool/Getty Images

Despite Shortfalls And Delays, U.S. Testing Czar Says Efforts Are Mostly 'Sufficient'

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