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An executive order President Trump signed Monday aims to make most hospital pricing more transparent to patients, long before they get the bill. Sam Edwards/Caiaimage/Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Edwards/Caiaimage/Getty Images
Patrick Semansky/AP

The executive order on drug price transparency that President Trump signed Monday doesn't spell out specific actions; rather, it directs the department of Health and Human Services to develop a policy and then undertake a lengthy rule-making process. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Trump Administration Pushes To Make Health Care Pricing More Transparent

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Researchers studied the gut microbes of runners from the Boston Marathon, isolating one strain of bacteria that may boost athletic performance. Nicolaus Czarnecki/Boston Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicolaus Czarnecki/Boston Herald via Getty Images

During a training session, Dr. Kenneth Kim and a surgical resident practice a hysterectomy on a robotic simulator at UAB Hospital. Mary Scott Hodgin/WBHM 90.3 hide caption

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Mary Scott Hodgin/WBHM 90.3

Doctors Learn The Nuts And Bolts Of Robotic Surgery

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A bowl of tsampa flour pictured with other dishes in a typical Tibetan lunch. Counterclockwise from left: potatoes in turmeric and cumin; liangfen; mung bean jelly and spring onions with cilantro, triple-fried in red chili pepper; and black tea. To make pa, the tsampa would be mixed with butter, tea, salt and sometimes Tibetan cheese. Courtesy of Tsering Shakya hide caption

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Courtesy of Tsering Shakya

Chris Marshall has organized pop-up Sans Bars in New York, Washington, D.C., and Anchorage, Alaska. And he has expanded into permanent spaces in Kansas City, Mo., and western Massachusetts. Julia Robinson for NPR hide caption

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Julia Robinson for NPR

Breaking The Booze Habit, Even Briefly, Has Its Benefits

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Bianey Reyes (center) and others protest the separation of children from their parents in front of El Paso Processing Center, an immigration detention facility, at the Mexican border on June 19, 2018, in El Paso, Texas. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Opinion: The 'Filthy And Uncomfortable Circumstances' Of Detained Migrant Children

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Health workers treat a patient at the Ebola Treatment Center in the city of Butembo, in the Democratic Republic of Congo. It's one of three locations where researchers have been conducting a clinical trial of four experimental treatments for the disease. John Wessels/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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John Wessels/AFP/Getty Images

CRISPR technology already allows scientists to make very precise modifications to DNA, and it could revolutionize how doctors prevent and treat many diseases. But using it to create gene-edited babies is still widely considered unethical. Gregor Fischer/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Gregor Fischer/picture alliance via Getty Images

A Russian Biologist Wants To Create More Gene-Edited Babies

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Bella and Will Doolittle started their podcast, the Alzheimer's Chronicles, after Bella was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's two years ago. Brian Mann/NPR hide caption

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Brian Mann/NPR

Pulling Back The Curtain On Alzheimer's, Through Its Lighter And Darker Moments

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Gary Hairston, a coal miner for 27 years, spoke at the hearing. He has been diagnosed with Progressive Massive Fibrosis, the advanced stage of black lung disease. House Committee on Education and Labor hide caption

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House Committee on Education and Labor

THC, a key psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, is toxic to dogs, veterinarians warn. So keeping dogs away from discarded joints, edible marijuana or drug-tainted poop is important. Hillary Kladke/Getty Images hide caption

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Hillary Kladke/Getty Images

Legal Weed Is A Danger To Dogs. Here's How To Know If Your Pup Got Into Pot

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Volunteers participate in a recent Healthy U leader training in Lander, Wyo. the program provides health skills training to people in rural areas. According to a recent poll, 26 percent of rural Americans said there has been a time in the past few years when they needed health care, but did not get it. Courtesy of Dominick Duhamel hide caption

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Courtesy of Dominick Duhamel

When There's No Doctor Nearby, Volunteers Help Rural Patients Manage Chronic Illness

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