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Shots - Health News

Shots

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Care resource coordinator Luisa Schaeffer scrolls through her COVID-19 isolation case list for the day: One woman is out of milk, while another needs help finding a doctor and making an appointment. A man also asks about getting help to pay rent. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

With the coronavirus spreading, farms try to keep workers like these in Greenfield, Calif. safe through physical distancing and other measures but advocates for laborers say protections are often not adequate. Brent Stirton/Getty Images hide caption

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Brent Stirton/Getty Images

In 2019, the FDA approved Spravato for patients with major depressive disorder who hadn't responded to other treatments. Now, the agency is adding patients who are having suicidal thoughts or have recently attempted to harm themselves or take their own lives. Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

Nasal Spray Is A New Antidepressant Option For People At High Risk of Suicide

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Ruth Talbot/NPR

Coronavirus Cases Are Surging. The Contact Tracing Workforce Is Not

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As coronavirus outbreaks continue to flare in the United States, modelers project that the country will hit nearly 300,000 deaths by Dec. 1. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

300,000 Deaths By December? 9 Takeaways From The Newest COVID-19 Projections

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Tony Potts, 69, a retiree from Ormond Beach, Fla., receives his first Moderna COVID-19 vaccine shot Tuesday as part of the company's phase three clinical trial. Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Prices For COVID-19 Vaccines Are Starting To Come Into Focus

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Potential COVID-19 vaccines are kept in a tray at Novavax labs in Maryland on March 20. The Novavax vaccine requires an immune-boosting ingredient called an adjuvant to be effective. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

The Special Sauce That Makes Some Vaccines Work

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Nika Cotton recently opened Soulcentricitea in Kansas City, Mo. When public schools shut down in the spring, Cotton had no one to watch her young children who are 8 and 10. So she quit her job in social work — and lost her health insurance — in order to start her own business. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith/KCUR

Vaccine-makers are readying 190 million doses of the flu vaccine for deployment across the U.S. this fall — 20 million more doses than in a typical year. A nasal spray version will be available, as well as shots. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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A mid-April sign in Philadelphia reminds passersby that current social distancing measures are for their own good. Cory Clark/ NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Cory Clark/ NurPhoto via Getty Images

In Pandemic, Green Doesn't Mean 'Go.' How Did Public Health Guidance Get So Muddled?

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The health threat posed by the coronavirus pandemic is particularly intense for people with cancer. Medication weakens the immune system. Cancer treatments are often delayed. FG Trade/Getty Images hide caption

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Pandemic Deepens Cancer's Stress And Tough Choices

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The industrial complex in Carthage where many Latinx residents work is a half-mile walk from the town square. Terra Fondriest for The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Terra Fondriest for The Washington Post via Getty Images

The federal government is giving out funds to develop seven new testing technologies which could increase testing capacity around the U.S. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

The Trump administration abruptly required hospitals to stop reporting COVID-19 data to the CDC and to use a new reporting system set up by a contractor. Two weeks in, the promised improvements in the data have yet to materialize. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

COVID-19 Hospital Data System That Bypasses CDC Plagued By Delays, Inaccuracies

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On the left is an unmodified hatchling of a longfin inshore squid (Doryteuthis pealeii). The one on the right was injected with CRISPR-Cas9 targeting a pigmentation gene before the first cell division. It has very few pigmented cells and lighter eyes. Karen Crawford hide caption

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Karen Crawford

The 1st Gene-Altered Squid Has Thrilled Biologists

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Voters in Kirkwood, Mo., cast ballots on Nov. 6, 2018 that helped decide the balance of power in Congress. Next week they'll get the chance to decide whether to expand Medicaid in their state. The measure could extend health coverage to more than 230,000 more Missourians. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Blood plasma — the yellowish, cell-free portion that remains after red and white blood cells have been filtered out by a machine and returned to the plasma donor — is rich with antibodies. Plasma from recovered COVID-19 patients might prove useful in preventing infection as well as in treatment, scientists say. Lindsey Wasson/Reuters hide caption

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Lindsey Wasson/Reuters

Harvested Antibodies Now Being Tested As A Prevention Tool Against COVID-19

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