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Health Care

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Coronavirus Cases Are Surging. The Contact Tracing Workforce Is Not

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Krisanapong Detraphiphat/Getty Images

One Drug, Two Prices

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Nika Cotton recently opened Soulcentricitea in Kansas City, Mo. When public schools shut down in the spring, Cotton had no one to watch her young children who are 8 and 10. So she quit her job in social work — and lost her health insurance — in order to start her own business. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith/KCUR

A mid-April sign in Philadelphia reminds passersby that current social distancing measures are for their own good. Cory Clark/ NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Cory Clark/ NurPhoto via Getty Images

In Pandemic, Green Doesn't Mean 'Go.' How Did Public Health Guidance Get So Muddled?

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The health threat posed by the coronavirus pandemic is particularly intense for people with cancer. Medication weakens the immune system. Cancer treatments are often delayed. FG Trade/Getty Images hide caption

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Pandemic Deepens Cancer's Stress And Tough Choices

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A patient in a first-stage study of a potential vaccine for COVID-19 receives a shot in March at the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute in Seattle. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Public Health Expert Calls To Repair Distrust In A COVID-19 Vaccine

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The industrial complex in Carthage where many Latinx residents work is a half-mile walk from the town square. Terra Fondriest for The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Terra Fondriest for The Washington Post via Getty Images

A medic checks the temperature of a Syrian worshipper before entering the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus to attend Friday prayer on May 15. To try to slow the coronavirus outbreak, the Syrian government has banned mass prayers and asked Syrians to stay home over the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha this weekend. Louai Beshara/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Louai Beshara/AFP via Getty Images

Director of the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Francis Collins, holds a model of the coronavirus. This is the sixth vaccine candidate to join Operation Warp Speed's portfolio, and the largest vaccine deal to date. Saul Loeb/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Voters in Kirkwood, Mo., cast ballots on Nov. 6, 2018 that helped decide the balance of power in Congress. Next week they'll get the chance to decide whether to expand Medicaid in their state. The measure could extend health coverage to more than 230,000 more Missourians. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Healthcare workers talk in the Covid-19 unit at United Memorial Medical Center in Houston, Texas in July. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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In Texas, 2 Big Problems Collide: Uninsured People And An Uncontrolled Pandemic

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Michael Conley, who is deaf, models a mask that has a transparent panel in San Diego on June 3. Face coverings can make communication harder for people who rely on reading lips, and that has spurred a slew of startups and volunteers to make masks with plastic windows. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Demand Surges For See-Through Face Masks As Pandemic Swells

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Registered Respiratory Therapist Niticia Mpanga looks through patient information in the ICU at Oakbend Medical Center in Richmond, Texas. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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President Trump speaks during a briefing Tuesday at the White House with a chart showing case fatality rate behind him. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Trump's Favorite Coronavirus Metric, The Case Fatality, Is Unreliable

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Izzy Benasso injured her knee while playing tennis with her father Steve Benasso in Denver. After the college student had knee surgery to repair the injury, her dad noticed her medical bills included a separate one from a surgical assistant for $1,167. Rachel Woolf for KHN hide caption

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Rachel Woolf for KHN

The Knee Surgeon Was In-Network. The Surgical Assistant Wasn't, And Billed $1,167

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Dr. Glenn Lopez administered a standard test for the coronavirus to Daniel Contreras at a mobile clinic in South Los Angeles last week. Though highly accurate, such tests can take days or more to process. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Rapid, Cheap, Less Accurate Coronavirus Testing Has A Place, Scientists Say

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Research suggests that kids tend to get infected with the coronavirus less often, and have milder symptoms than adults. There's less consensus on how much kids can spread the illness. Dan Kenyon/Getty Images hide caption

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Biomarin Pharmaceutical, a California company that makes what could become the first gene therapy for hemophilia, says its drug's price tag might be $3 million per patient. Maciej Frolow/Getty Images hide caption

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Maciej Frolow/Getty Images

Gene Therapy Shows Promise For Hemophilia, But Could Be Most Expensive U.S. Drug Ever

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Vickie Gregorio with Heartland Workforce Solutions in Omaha, Neb., updates a whiteboard outside the workforce office as unemployed job seekers wait in line for help. A recent change in federal rules gives some people who have lost their health plan along with their job more than the usual 60 days to sign up for COBRA health coverage. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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Nati Harnik/AP

Pregnancy is a time of hope and dreams for most women and their families — even during a pandemic. Still, their extra need to avoid catching the coronavirus has meant more isolation and sacrifices, too. Leo Patrizi/Getty Images hide caption

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Leo Patrizi/Getty Images

Safe Pregnancy As COVID-19 Surges: What's Best For Mom And Baby?

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Penguin Random House

Psychiatrist: America's 'Extremely Punitive' Prisons Make Mental Illness Worse

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