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Health Care

Unlike Planned Parenthood which pulled out of Title X family planning funding, many clinics still take the funding and must comply with new rules on discussing abortion. Doctors worry it will affect their relationships with patients. SDI Productions/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Bay (center), coach of a New York City "Bootcamp for New Dads," instructs Adewale Oshodi (left) and George Pasco in how to cradle an infant for best soothing. Jason LeCras for NPR hide caption

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Jason LeCras for NPR

Supporters of safe injection sites in Philadelphia rallied outside this week's federal hearing. The judge's ultimate ruling will determine if the proposed "Safehouse" facility to prevent deaths from opioid overdose would violate the federal Controlled Substances Act. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

Trump Administration Is In Court To Block Nation's 1st Supervised Injection Site

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Dr. Peter Grinspoon was a practicing physician when he became addicted to opioids. When he got caught, Grinspoon wasn't allowed access to what's now the standard treatment for addiction — buprenorphine or methadone (in addition to counseling) — precisely because he was a doctor. /Tony Luong for NPR hide caption

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/Tony Luong for NPR

For Health Workers Struggling With Addiction, Why Are Treatment Options Limited?

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Groupon and other deal sites are the latest marketing tactic in medicine, offering bargain prices for services such as CT scans. Colin Cuthbert/Science Photo Libra/Getty Images hide caption

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Abortion opponents in Sacramento, Calif., protest legislation that would require public university campuses in California to provide the pills used in medication abortion. April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

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April Dembosky/KQED

California Again Considers Making Abortion Pills Available At Public Colleges

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President Trump talked about expanding health coverage options for small businesses in a Rose Garden gathering at the White House in June. Al Drago/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Kristin Sollars (left) and Marci Ebberts say nursing is more than just a job. "Sometimes I wonder why everyone in the world doesn't want to be a nurse," Sollars says. Emilyn Sosa for StoryCorps hide caption

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Emilyn Sosa for StoryCorps

For 2 Nurses, Working In The ICU Is 'A Gift Of A Job'

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Before scheduling his hernia surgery, Wolfgang Balzer called the hospital, the surgeon and the anesthesiologist to get estimates for how much the procedure would cost. But when his bill came, the estimates he had obtained were wildly off. John Woike for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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John Woike for Kaiser Health News

Bill Of The Month: Estimate For Cost Of Hernia Surgery Misses The Mark

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State's attorney Brad Beckworth lays out one of his closing arguments in Oklahoma's case against drugmaker Johnson & Johnson at the Cleveland County Courthouse in Norman, Okla. in July. The judge in the case ruled Monday that J&J must pay $572 million to the state. Chris Landsberger/AP hide caption

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Chris Landsberger/AP

Oklahoma Wanted $17 Billion To Fight Its Opioid Crisis: What's The Real Cost?

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All the portraits hanging on the wall inside the Louis Bornstein Family Amphitheater at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston on June 12, 2018 were of men, nearly all white. The portraits have since been removed. Pat Greenhouse/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Pat Greenhouse/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Academic Science Rethinks All-Too-White 'Dude Walls' Of Honor

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A sign for Flu Shots at a CVS Pharmacy in Boston. Rick Friedman/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Rick Friedman/Corbis via Getty Images

Opinion: We Are Risking Health And Life

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A man cools off in a fountain in New York's Washington Square Park this summer. Death from all causes doubled during a heat wave in New York City in August 1975, with heart attacks and strokes accounting for a majority of the excess deaths. Jeenah Moon/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeenah Moon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

In rugged, rural areas, patients often have little choice about how they'll get to the hospital in an emergency. "The presence of private equity in the air ambulance industry indicates that investors see profit opportunities," a 2017 report from the federal Government Accountability Office notes. pidjoe/Getty Images hide caption

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that most new heroin addicts first became hooked on prescription painkillers, such as oxycodone, before graduating to heroin, which is cheaper. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Tales Of Corporate Painkiller Pushing: 'The Death Rates Just Soared'

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According to the latest NPR-IBM Watson Health Poll exercise, including stretching and yoga, is popular among younger people as a way to relieve pain. Daniel Grill/Getty Images/Tetra images RF hide caption

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Daniel Grill/Getty Images/Tetra images RF

Mahmee CEO Melissa Hanna (right) and her mother, Linda Hanna (left), co-founded the company in 2014. Linda's more than 40 years of clinical experience as a registered nurse and certified lactation consultant helped them understand the need, they say. Keith Alcantara/Mahmee hide caption

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Keith Alcantara/Mahmee

This App Aims To Save New Moms' Lives

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Robert Findley died after falling on the ice during a winter storm this February in Fort Scott, Kan. Mercy Hospital had recently closed, so he had to be flown to a neurology center 90 miles north in Kansas City, Mo. Christopher Smith for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Christopher Smith for Kaiser Health News

No Mercy: After The Hospital Closes, How Do People Get Emergency Care?

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The wide-open spaces of Arco, Idaho, appeal to some doctors with a love of the outdoors. Thomas Hawk/Flickr hide caption

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Thomas Hawk/Flickr

Creative Recruiting Helps Rural Hospitals Overcome Doctor Shortages

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The "Cadillac tax," an enacted but not yet implemented part of the Affordable Care Act, is a 40% tax on the most generous employer-provided health insurance plans — those that cost more than $11,200 per year for an individual policy or $30,150 for family coverage. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg Creative/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg Creative/Getty Images