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Karl Franz Williams, the owner and operator of the cocktail bar 67 Orange Street in Harlem, stands in front of the speakeasy-inspired bar. Camille Petersen/Camille Petersen hide caption

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Camille Petersen/Camille Petersen

Inside Seating? A Harlem Bar Owner Navigates COVID-19's Changing Rules

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Grocery shopping the first few weeks of this crisis was insane (and frankly, it's still pretty nuts now). Shelves were empty. People were trying to buy up tons of stuff because no one knew what was going to happen; so demand was way up, but supply was the same. NPR hide caption

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NPR

Five trailers serving fried fair foods, drinks and dessert set up in a parking lot at the Atrium in Pennsylvania's Butler County. Kiley Koskinsky/WESA hide caption

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Kiley Koskinsky/WESA

Have A Corn Dog: Fair Food Without The Fair

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Author Susan Burton struggled with disordered eating for decades. "Hunger was something that I believed protected me and gave me power," she says. Anna Kurzaeva/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Kurzaeva/Getty Images

From 'Empty' To 'Satisfied': Author Traces A Hunger That Food Can't Fix

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Across the world, bakers are selling treats to profit charities that support Black lives. Home baker Liz Rosado created these cookies as part of an announcement that she was participating in the event. Courtesy of Liz Rosado hide caption

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Courtesy of Liz Rosado

In an episode called "Burritos at the Border," Padma Lakshmi cooks with first generation Mexican American restaurant owner Emiliano Marentes. Dominic Valente/Hulu hide caption

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Dominic Valente/Hulu

'Taste The Nation' Proves Who's At The Heart Of American Food: Immigrants

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Fong Lam holding ginseng. Julia DeWitt hide caption

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Julia DeWitt

The Problem Of The Root

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"We recognize Aunt Jemima's origins are based on a racial stereotype," parent company Quaker Foods says, announcing plans to change the brand's logo and name. Donald King/AP hide caption

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Donald King/AP

Prices for baking flour and eggs have fallen, suggesting an easing in the baking craze that gripped hungry and housebound consumers in the early weeks of the coronavirus pandemic. Karin Dreyer/Getty Images/Tetra Images RF hide caption

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Karin Dreyer/Getty Images/Tetra Images RF

The Great Pandemic Bake-Off May Be Over

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Workers line up to enter a Tyson Foods pork processing plant last month in Logansport, Ind. Some of the worst workplace coronavirus outbreaks have been in the meatpacking industry. Major meatpackers JBS USA, Smithfield Foods and Tyson have said worker safety is their highest priority. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

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Michael Conroy/AP

Thousands Of Workers Say Their Jobs Are Unsafe As Economy Reopens

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Workers fillet fish seafood processing plant in Kodiak, Alaska in 2002. The industry faces an outbreak of COVID-19 just as salmon and pollack fishing seasons are ramping up. Marion Owen/AP hide caption

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Marion Owen/AP

Safia Munye looks over the remains of her restaurant, Mama Safia's Kitchen, on Saturday. It was destroyed last week during protests in Minneapolis. Jim Urquhart for NPR hide caption

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Jim Urquhart for NPR

Restaurant Owner Whose Business Burned Calls For Justice For George Floyd

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Yesenia Ortiz works at a grocery store in Greensboro, N.C. She says she wishes she would get paid more during the pandemic because of the extra level of risk to which she is exposed. Sarah Gonzalez/NPR hide caption

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Sarah Gonzalez/NPR

Questlove has written two cookbooks, and pre-pandemic, was a frequent potluck host. Michael Baca hide caption

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Michael Baca

'Food Is Social Adhesive,' So Questlove Is Hosting A Virtual Potluck

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People load their vehicles with boxes of food at a Los Angeles Regional Food Bank earlier this month in Los Angeles. Food banks across the United States are seeing numbers and people they have never seen before amid unprecedented unemployment from the COVID-19 outbreak. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Food Banks Get The Love, But SNAP Does More To Fight Hunger

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French chef Guy Savoy poses with a face mask in the kitchen of one of his restaurants, in the Monnaie de Paris building, on Tuesday. Christophe Archambault/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Christophe Archambault/AFP via Getty Images

3-Star Michelin Chef Guy Savoy Has Begun Offering Takeout In Paris

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Bartolomé Perez of Los Angeles has cooked at McDonald's for 30 years. He helped stage a walkout at his restaurant in April after a coworker tested positive for COVID-19. Courtesy of the Fight for $15 and a Union hide caption

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Courtesy of the Fight for $15 and a Union

A farmer leads dairy cows from the pasture to the milking barn at a creamery in Gallipolis, Ohio. The USDA launched a $3 billion plan to distribute food to families, called the Farmers to Family Food Box Program. Matthew Hatcher/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Hatcher/Bloomberg via Getty Images

USDA Secretary Says Despite Plant Closures, He Does Not Anticipate Food Shortages

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Wang Ying/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

The Restaurant From The Future

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The latest inflation data offers a snapshot of Americans' new pandemic spending habits. Prices are down for most goods and services but up sharply for groceries. Kevin Lamarque/Reuters hide caption

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Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

We're Eating At Home And It's Costing Us More

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As sales to restaurant clients dried up, oyster farmer Peter Stein had to adapt or perish. Now, he's delivering oysters directly to individual customers — doing about 20% of his usual business. Jonathan Pearson / Flickr hide caption

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Jonathan Pearson / Flickr

Business Adapts To Deliver The World, In A Long Island Oyster, Door To Door

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