Energy Energy

Energy

Electric vans charge at a warehouse of the German postal and logistics service Deutsche Post near Frankfurt in July 2018. Fleet vehicles are increasingly going electric in Europe and China, and some analysts say American fleets will be following suit. Yann Schreiber/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Yann Schreiber/AFP via Getty Images

From Delivery Trucks To Scooter-Moving Vans, Fleets Are Going Electric

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Levi Draheim, 11, wears a dust mask as he participates in a demonstration in Miami in July 2019. A lawsuit filed by him and other young people urging action against climate change was thrown out by a federal appeals court Friday. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

Kids' Climate Case 'Reluctantly' Dismissed By Appeals Court

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The Navajo Generating Station shut down in November 2019. The West's largest coal-fired power plant provided $12 million in yearly royalties to the Hopi Tribe. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Laurel Morales/KJZZ

Hopi Look To Tourism, Ranching For Income After Coal Power Plant Closure

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The Blue Lake Rancheria microgrid powers a number of buildings on the reservation and helped provide necessary energy during county-wide power outages. Courtesy of the Blue Lake Rancheria hide caption

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Courtesy of the Blue Lake Rancheria

California Reservation's Solar Microgrid Provides Power During Utility Shutoffs

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Jack George, an employee at Royal Lighting, looks at chandeliers using incandescent light bulbs at the store in Los Angeles. A federal judge is allowing California to enforce updated efficiency standards that will affect such specialty lightbulbs. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

A fallen PG&E utility pole lays on a property burned during a wildfire. The company has several settlement deals meant to clear liabilities stemming from fires sparked by its equipment. Philip Pacheco/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Philip Pacheco/AFP via Getty Images

The Monastery of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel in Washington, D.C. is the new host of a 151 kW community solar garden. The panels will provide roughly 50 nearby households with green energy. Mhari Shaw/NPR hide caption

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Mhari Shaw/NPR

Environmental activists rally outside of New York Supreme Court in October in Manhattan, the first day of the trial accusing ExxonMobil of misleading shareholders about its climate change accounting. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Exxon Wins New York Climate Change Fraud Case

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The sun sets over the dark Manhattan skyline on August 14, 2003. A power outage affected large parts of the northeastern United States and Canada. Robert Giroux/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Giroux/Getty Images

Protesters demonstrate against Exxon Mobil in New York City in October. New York state's attorney general alleged that the company misled its investors by lying about the potential impacts of climate regulation on its bottom line. Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Corbis via Getty Images

Peter Melnik, a fourth-generation dairy farmer, owns Bar-Way Farm, Inc. in Deerfield, Mass. He has an anaerobic digester on his farm that converts food waste into renewable energy. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Allison Aubrey/NPR

Chew On This: Farmers Are Using Food Waste To Make Electricity

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Jeff Anderson worked at the LEDVANCE lightbulb factory in St. Marys for more than 20 years. He is considering a career change to heavy equipment operator. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

Lighting Industry's Future Dims As Efficient LED Bulbs Take Over

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Oil prices are down amid weak demand, and investors no longer seem willing to write the industry a blank check. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

As Oil Prices Drop And Money Dries Up, Is The U.S. Shale Boom Going Bust?

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