Business and Financial News Find the latest business news with reports on Wall Street, interest rates, banking, companies, and U.S. and world financial markets. Subscribe to the Business Story of the Day podcast.

Business

Amanda Aronczyk/NPR

Episode 988: The Economics Of Hospital Beds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/827016244/827193983" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A Delta Air Lines airplane was worked on by ground crew last month in Red Rock, Ariz. Many planes were being kept at the facility while airlines cut back on service because of the coronavirus. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ross D. Franklin/AP

Millions of people are using Zoom to communicate, but the company is facing mounting scrutiny over whether it is adequately protecting users. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

A grocery store worker stocks bread at a MOM's Organic Market in Washington, D.C., on April 2. Last week, bread sales jumped 30% compared to a year ago. But yeast sales were up more than 450%. Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

Chicken hatcheries say they're seeing a spike in interest from people wanting to raise the birds at home. A poultry expert says that for the average person keeping half a dozen chickens in the summer, "you would get plenty of eggs for the family." Mike Segar/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Mike Segar/Reuters
APU GOMES/AFP via Getty Images

The Jobs Crisis

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/826919059/826943409" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Workers in Dhaka sew protective suits at a garment factory during Bangladesh's lockdown. Sultan Mahmud Mukut/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sultan Mahmud Mukut/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Together Inc. food bank workers distribute food at a drive-through location in Omaha, Neb., last week. Disruptions in the agricultural supply chain caused by the coronavirus pandemic are making it difficult for food banks. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Nati Harnik/AP

Zoom is wildly popular, but it's now under scrutiny for security and privacy issues. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

A Must For Millions, Zoom Has A Dark Side — And An FBI Warning

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/826129520/826522368" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Trump administration is telling 3M to prioritize the U.S. market for its N95 respirator masks during the global COVID-19 pandemic. The company has been accused of not doing enough to support the U.S. health care system and of fostering price gouging. Smith Collection/Gado via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Smith Collection/Gado via Getty Images

A patient with suspected COVID-19 arrives at Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn on Thursday. Even as the risk of big medical bills climbs, many Americans are losing their jobs and health insurance right now. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Coronavirus Reset: How To Get Health Insurance Now

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/826316458/826406327" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice delivers his annual State of the State address at the state Capitol in Charleston, W.Va., in January. Justice and his family own coal mining companies that have agreed to pay the government more than $5 million in delinquent mine safety fines, the Justice Department says. Chris Jackson/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Chris Jackson/AP

David Bramante, the owner of West Newton Theatre in Newton, Mass., stands in the doorway of the theater noting its closure on March 27. Suzanne Kreiter/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Suzanne Kreiter/Boston Globe via Getty Images
NPR

U.S. Lost 701,000 Jobs In March; Much Worse To Come

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/826096581/826595458" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Emily Gualdoni and Gordon Stewart/Emily Gualdoni Photography and Gordon Stewart

The Coronavirus Pivot

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/826358111/826397254" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Zoom CEO Eric Yuan attends the opening bell at Nasdaq as his company holds its IPO in New York. The company's seen a massive growth in users amidst the coronavirus pandemic. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Lennihan/AP

A State of Michigan Unemployment Agency office that is currently closed because of coronavirus. The number of new people claiming unemployment totaled 6.6 million, doubling the record set a week earlier according to the Labor Department. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images

Ventilator Shortages; 6.6 Million New Unemployment Claims

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/825938284/826311799" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Henry Paulson, who served as Treasury secretary during the 2008 financial crisis, says the current Treasury secretary and the Fed chair have "got their work cut out for them." Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Get Money Out To The Economy Quickly, Ex-Treasury Secretary Says

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/825903888/826522362" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A lone passenger walks past the north checkpoint at Denver International Airport on April 1, which was closed because of a lack of traffic as a statewide stay-at-home order remains in effect to help reduce the spread of the coronavirus. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David Zalubowski/AP

To Stay Aloft With Federal Aid, Airlines Must Keep Flying

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/825550048/825906121" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">