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Asia

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Where Coronavirus Is Now Causing Concern: Iran, Italy, South Korea

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President Trump speaks at the "Namaste Trump" event at Sardar Patel Gujarat Stadium in Ahmedabad, India, on Monday as Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi looks on. Trump said the two leaders were discussing a possible trade deal and called Modi "a very tough negotiator." Alexander Drago/Reuters hide caption

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Alexander Drago/Reuters

'Namaste Trump!' India's Modi Welcomes U.S. Leader With An Epic Party

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President Trump and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi attend "Howdy, Modi!" at NRG Stadium in Houston, Texas, Sept. 22, 2019. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

India Set To Welcome Trump, Whose First Stop Will Be In Modi's Home State Of Gujarat

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Abdullah, 13, lost his left leg when he stepped on an improvised explosive device. He takes a break from walking practice at the International Committee of the Red Cross physical rehabilitation center in Kabul on Dec. 1, 2019. Altaf Qadri/AP hide caption

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Altaf Qadri/AP

A medical worker takes a look outside a preliminary testing facility at the National Medical Center in Seoul, South Korea, where people suspected of having contracted the novel strain of coronavirus are being tested. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

Thailand's Constitutional Court ordered the popular opposition Future Forward Party dissolved, declaring that it violated election law by accepting a loan from its leader Thanathorn Juangroongruangkit. Chaiwat Subprasom/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett hide caption

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Chaiwat Subprasom/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett

U.S. Special Representative for Afghanistan Reconciliation Zalmay Khalilzad attends the Intra-Afghan Dialogue talks in the Qatari capital, Doha, in July. Karim Jaafar /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Karim Jaafar /AFP via Getty Images

U.S., Afghanistan And Taliban Announce 7-Day 'Reduction In Violence'

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Local residents protest the plans to quarantine evacuees from coronavirus-hit China at a local hospital, in the settlement of Novi Sanzhary, Ukraine, on Thursday. Maksym Mykhailyk/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Maksym Mykhailyk/AFP via Getty Images

Daniel Wethli got a warm welcome from his mom and dad at the Pittsburgh airport last week after clearing two weeks of quarantine in Southern California. He was studying in Wuhan when the novel coronavirus shut the city down, but never showed any signs of infection. Daniel Wethli hide caption

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Daniel Wethli

Evacuated For COVID-19 Scare, Pennsylvania Man Reflects On Life After Quarantine

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Researchers give fruit juice to a short-nosed fruit bat after sampling its saliva, blood, urine and poop. They'll look for new viruses in the bat's bodily fluids. Kevin Olival hide caption

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Kevin Olival

New Research: Bats Harbor Hundreds Of Coronaviruses, And Spillovers Aren't Rare

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Workers in Pyongyang produce masks for protection against the new coronavirus. Experts say North Korea's track record of fighting epidemics does not bode well for its handling of the coronavirus outbreak. Kim Won-Jin/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kim Won-Jin/AFP via Getty Images

North Korea Claims Zero Coronavirus Cases, But Experts Are Skeptical

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A girl in a park in Beijing on Feb. 15. Researchers are looking at the impact of the newly identified coronavirus on children. Wang Zhao /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Wang Zhao /AFP via Getty Images

Coronavirus Is Contagious, But Kids Seem Less Vulnerable So Far

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The Metropole Hotel in Hong Kong was ground zero for a super-spreading event during the 2003 SARS outbreak. K.Y. Cheng/South China Morning Post via Getty Images hide caption

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K.Y. Cheng/South China Morning Post via Getty Images

What's A 'Super-Spreading Event'? And Has It Happened With COVID-19?

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Australians Clare Hedger and her mother are now free from a two-week quarantine on the Diamond Princess cruise ship in Yokohama, Japan. Health officials in Japan are being sharply criticized for their handling of the coronavirus quarantine on the ship. Clare Hedger/via Reuters hide caption

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Clare Hedger/via Reuters

An entrance to a dormitory for Foxconn workers. China's factories normally ramp up production right after the Lunar New Year, but few workers have returned so far this year. Amy Cheng/NPR hide caption

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Amy Cheng/NPR

The Wide-Ranging Ways In Which The Coronavirus Is Hurting Global Business

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