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Africa

Samuel Swedi, 22, is an electrical engineering student at Goma University in the Democratic Republic of Congo. He doesn't have a textbook — just whatever notes he has written in his notebook. Samantha Reinders for NPR hide caption

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Samantha Reinders for NPR

Esperance Nabintu, 42, an Ebola survivor, photographed on Aug. 15 in Goma. One of her children also contracted the disease and survived. But her husband, Rene Daniele Fataki, died from the disease. This photo was taken as friends and family gathered at her home to mourn and to celebrate his life. Samantha Reinders for NPR hide caption

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Samantha Reinders for NPR

Laborers in the sugar cane fields of Central America are experiencing a rapid and unexplained form of kidney failure. Above: Harvesting sugar cane in Chichigalpa, Nicaragua. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

Whatever Happened To ... The Mysterious Kidney Disease Striking Central America?

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Nelson Mandela Foundation CEO Sello Hatang points to South Africa's current flag as he welcomes a ruling against its old flag in Johannesburg Wednesday. At right is Ernst Roets, leader of the AfriForum group that was targeted in the foundation's lawsuit. Denis Farrell/AP hide caption

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Denis Farrell/AP

Locusts swarm over Yemen's capital. Mohammed Huwais /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohammed Huwais /AFP/Getty Images

Maybe The Way To Control Locusts Is By Growing Crops They Don't Like

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Hassan Hajjaj, born in Morocco in 1961, is often called the Andy Warhol of Marrakesh for his fusion of glamour and everyday life. Both are evident in his 2017 portrait Cardi B Unity. The rap star, dressed in a high-fashion outfit, sits on utilitarian green plastic cartons against a textured fabric backdrop. The frame consists of tins of green tea, each decorated with a butterfly. Hassan Hajjaj/Courtesy of Third Line Gallery, Dubai, and Yossi Milo Gallery, New York hide caption

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Hassan Hajjaj/Courtesy of Third Line Gallery, Dubai, and Yossi Milo Gallery, New York

Disability activists from around the world attended a seminar in Oregon. From left, Joyce Peter of Vanuatu, Sidonie Nduwimana of Burundi,, Wendy Beatriz Caishpal Jaco of El Salvador, Gina Rose Balanlay of the Philippines (standing) and Raluca Oancea of Romania. Aparna Vidyasagar for NPR hide caption

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Aparna Vidyasagar for NPR

Big royal statues from the Kingdom of Dahomey, in present-day Benin, are pictured in 2018 at the Quai Branly Museum in Paris. Gerard Julien/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Gerard Julien/AFP/Getty Images

Across Europe, Museums Rethink What To Do With Their African Art Collections

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Renee Bach, 30, is being sued in Ugandan civil court over the deaths of children who were treated at the critical care center she ran in Uganda. She has left Uganda and is now living in Bedford County, Virginia, where she grew up. Julia Rendleman/for NPR hide caption

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Julia Rendleman/for NPR

American With No Medical Training Ran Center For Malnourished Ugandan Kids. 105 Died

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Boer prisoners in a camp at Bloemfontein, 2nd Boer War, 1899-1902. Ann Ronan Pictures/Print Collector/Getty Images hide caption

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Ann Ronan Pictures/Print Collector/Getty Images

Gambians are glued to TV and radio as members of a paramilitary that worked with former Gambian President Yahya Jammeh testify before the Truth, Reconciliation and Reparations Commission. The hearings are investigating alleged human rights abuses during Jammeh's tenure in office, from 1994 to 2017. Samantha Reinders for NPR hide caption

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Samantha Reinders for NPR

Why Everyone In Gambia Is Tuning Into A Broadcast About 'Truth'

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Health workers in Congo carry the coffins of Ebola victims to a burial site. John Wessels/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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John Wessels/AFP/Getty Images

Ebola Outbreak In Congo Enters Year 2. Is An End In Sight?

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