Rachel Martin Rachel Martin is the co-host of Morning Edition and Up First.
Rachel Martin.
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Rachel Martin

Stephen Voss/NPR
Rachel Martin.
Stephen Voss/NPR

Rachel Martin

Host, Morning Edition and Up First

Rachel Martin is host of Morning Edition, as well as NPR's morning news podcast Up First, along with Steve Inskeep and David Greene.

Before taking on this role in December 2016, Martin was the host of Weekend Edition Sunday for four years. Martin also served as National Security Correspondent for NPR, where she covered both defense and intelligence issues. She traveled regularly to Iraq and Afghanistan with the Secretary of Defense, reporting on the U.S. wars and the effectiveness of the Pentagon's counterinsurgency strategy. Martin also reported extensively on the changing demographic of the U.S. military – from the debate over whether to allow women to fight in combat units – to the repeal of Don't Ask Don't Tell. Her reporting on how the military is changing also took her to a U.S. Air Force base in New Mexico for a rare look at how the military trains drone pilots.

Martin was part of the team that launched NPR's experimental morning news show, The Bryant Park Project, based in New York — a two-hour daily multimedia program that she co-hosted with Alison Stewart and Mike Pesca.

In 2006-2007, Martin served as NPR's religion correspondent. Her piece on Islam in America was awarded "Best Radio Feature" by the Religion News Writers Association in 2007. As one of NPR's reporters assigned to cover the Virginia Tech massacre that same year, she was on the school's campus within hours of the shooting and on the ground in Blacksburg, Va., covering the investigation and emotional aftermath in the following days.

Based in Berlin, Germany, Martin worked as a NPR foreign correspondent from 2005-2006. During her time in Europe, she covered the London terrorist attacks, the federal elections in Germany, the 2006 World Cup and issues surrounding immigration and shifting cultural identities in Europe.

Her foreign reporting experience extends beyond Europe. Martin has also worked extensively in Afghanistan. She began reporting from there as a freelancer during the summer of 2003, covering the reconstruction effort in the wake of the U.S. invasion. In fall 2004, Martin returned for several months to cover Afghanistan's first democratic presidential election. She has reported widely on women's issues in Afghanistan, the fledgling political and governance system and the U.S.-NATO fight against the insurgency. She has also reported from Iraq, where she covered U.S. military operations and the strategic alliance between Sunni sheiks and the U.S. military in Anbar province.

Martin started her career at public radio station KQED in San Francisco, as a producer and reporter.

She holds an undergraduate degree in political science from the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Washington, and a Master's degree in International Affairs from Columbia University.

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News Brief: Intelligence On Iran, Israeli Election, Emissions Standards

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News Brief: Asylum Requests, Tariff Delay, Flavored E-Cigarettes

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Christopher Ingraham, his wife Briana, and their three children — twins Charles (center) and Jack (right), 6, and William, 2, who was born after the family moved to Red Lake Falls, Minn. Courtesy of the Ingraham family hide caption

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A Throwaway Line Led 'Washington Post' Reporter To Call Rural Midwest His New Home

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News Brief: Bolton's Exit, Guantánamo Probe, Netanyahu's Vow

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News Brief: Taliban Negotiations, Opioid Settlement, Sharpiegate

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John Coltrane performs with drummer Elvin Jones and saxophonist Eric Dolphy in 1961. Impulse! Records is set to release the "lost" Coltrane album Blue World on Sept. 27. Bill Wagg/Redferns/Getty Images hide caption

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Not All 'Lost' Jazz Albums Are Created Equal

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News Brief: Hurricane Dorian, Fatal Boat Fire, Joe Biden

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News Brief: Border Enforcement Funds, Tropical Storm, E-Cigarette Lawsuit

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News Brief: Trump Rally, Israel Controversy, Immigrant Workers

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Carrie Brownstein and Corin Tucker of Sleater-Kinney. Nikko LaMere/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Burn, Don't Freeze: Sleater-Kinney On Making Art In The Midst Of Change

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News Brief: Recession Fears, Philly Standoff, Hong Kong Protests

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News Brief: Hong Kong Protests, China Tariffs, Placido Domingo

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