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Babies of moms who are in the ICU with severe flu have a greater chance of being born premature and underweight. Nenov/Getty Images hide caption

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Nenov/Getty Images

Severe Flu Raises Risk Of Birth Problems For Pregnant Women, Babies

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Dr. Lisa Hofler runs a University of New Mexico clinic that stocks mifepristone but doesn't routinely provide prenatal care. She and her colleagues can schedule same-day appointments for women diagnosed with miscarriages elsewhere. Adria Malcolm for NPR hide caption

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Adria Malcolm for NPR

While some new drugs entering the market are driving up prices for consumers, drug companies are also hiking prices on older drugs. Sigrid Olsson/PhotoAlto/Getty Images hide caption

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Sigrid Olsson/PhotoAlto/Getty Images

Hillary Frank is the creator of the podcast The Longest Shortest Time. Her new book is Weird Parenting Wins. Richard Frank/Penguin Random House hide caption

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Richard Frank/Penguin Random House

Childbirth Injury Led A New Mom To Start A Parenting Podcast 'To Feel Less Alone'

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A colorized image of a brain cell from an Alzheimer's patient shows a neurofibrillary tangle (red) inside the cytoplasm (yellow) of the cell. The tangles consist primarily of a protein called tau. SPL/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Science Source

Alzheimer's Disease May Develop Differently In African-Americans, Study Suggests

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Loretta Boesing, of Park Hills, Mo., with her son Wesley, who underwent a liver transplant in 2012. Boesing worried the potency of her son's anti-rejection medicine could have been affected by the extremely hot weather when it was delivered. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith/KCUR

Extreme Temperatures May Pose Risks To Some Mail-Order Meds

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CSA-Printstock/Getty Images

Is It A Nasty Cold Or The Flu?

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Abortion-rights advocates rally outside the Iowa capitol building in May. A law there banning abortion after a fetal heartbeat is detected is one of several state laws on its way through the courts. Barbara Rodriguez/AP hide caption

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Barbara Rodriguez/AP

Activists Brace For 2019 Abortion-Rights Battles In The States

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Winter swimmers enjoyed an icy dip in Poland's Garczyn lake last February. Recorded air temperature was around 14 degrees Farenheit, and a large ice hole had to be cut to allow the lake bathing. NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/Getty Images

Coconut oil's potential health benefits are outweighed by its heavy dose of saturated fat, most nutrition experts say. Saturated fat is associated with an increased risk of heart attack and stroke. Russ Rohde/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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Russ Rohde/Getty Images/Cultura RF

Is Coconut Oil All It's Cracked Up To Be? Get The Facts On This Faddish Fat

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Researchers say human brains can become overwhelmed by cute traits, such as large eyes and small noses, embodied by movie characters like Bambi. Disney Junior/Disney Channel via Getty Images hide caption

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Disney Junior/Disney Channel via Getty Images

When Too Cute Is Too Much, The Brain Can Get Aggressive

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Robert and Tiffany Cano of San Tan Valley, Ariz., have a new marriage, a new house and a 10-month-old son, Brody. Since Brody was born, the Canos have racked up nearly $12,000 in medical debt. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Sarah Witter had two operations to repair bones in her lower left leg after a skiing accident last February. The second surgery was needed to replace a stabilizing plate that broke. Matt Baldelli for KHN hide caption

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Matt Baldelli for KHN
Kristen Uroda for NPR

If You Feel Thankful, Write It Down. It's Good For Your Health

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Research inspired by soccer headers has led to fresh insights into how the brain weathers hits to the head. Photo illustration by David Madison/Getty Images hide caption

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Photo illustration by David Madison/Getty Images

Bad Vibes: How Hits To The Head Are Transferred To The Brain

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Before light reaches these rods and cones in the retina, it passes through some specialized cells that send signals to brain areas that affect whether you feel happy or sad. Omikron /Getty Images/Science Source hide caption

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Omikron /Getty Images/Science Source

Scientists Find A Brain Circuit That Could Explain Seasonal Depression

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Susie Christoff tried several drugs to cope with her painful psoriatic arthritis before finding Cosentyx worked the best. The problem was the cost. Chris Bartlett/for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Chris Bartlett/for Kaiser Health News

Why The U.S. Remains The Most Expensive Market For 'Biologic' Drugs In The World

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U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams said Tuesday that local restrictions, including bans on indoor vaping, are needed to reduce youth e-cigarette use. Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images

Sarah Witter fractured two bones in her lower left leg while skiing in Vermont last February. She had two operations to repair the damage. The second surgery was needed to replace a metal plate that broke after it was implanted. Matt Baldelli for KHN hide caption

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Matt Baldelli for KHN

Bill Of The Month: $43,208 For Repeat Surgery To Replace Broken Medical Device

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