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Modern tools of biology could allow someone to recreate a dangerous virus, such as smallpox, from scratch. Dr. Hans Gelderblom/Visuals Unlimited/Getty Images hide caption

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Dr. Hans Gelderblom/Visuals Unlimited/Getty Images

Report For Defense Department Ranks Top Threats From 'Synthetic Biology'

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Stephanie and Natalie enrolled their older son in sessions at a Brain Balance Achievement Center in the hope that it would help him make friends. Hokyoung Kim for NPR hide caption

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Hokyoung Kim for NPR

'Cutting Edge' Program For Children With Autism And ADHD Rests On Razor-Thin Evidence

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Rita Steyn has a family history of cancer so she ordered a home genetic testing kit to see if she carried certain genetic mutations that increase the risk for the disease. Courtesy of Rita Steyn hide caption

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Courtesy of Rita Steyn

Results Of At-Home Genetic Tests For Health Can Be Hard To Interpret

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A serving of salmon contains about 600 IUs of vitamin D, researchers say, and a cup of fortified milk around 100. Cereals and juices are sometimes fortified, too. Check the labels, researchers say, and aim for 600 IUs daily, or 800 if you're older than 70. Dorling Kindersley/Getty Images/Dorling Kindersley hide caption

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Dorling Kindersley/Getty Images/Dorling Kindersley

Does Vitamin D Really Protect Against Colorectal Cancer?

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Flaws in a study of the Mediterranean diet led to a softening of its conclusions about health benefits. But don't switch to a diet of cotton candy just yet. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Rinsing your produce is a good idea, but it won't give you 100 percent protection from bacteria that cause foodborne illness unless you cook it thoroughly. Because we eat lettuce raw, a lot of people got sick in a recent outbreak. StockFood/Getty Images/Foodcollection hide caption

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StockFood/Getty Images/Foodcollection

If you're at low risk for heart disease, an electrocardiogram shouldn't be a routine test for you, a panel of medical experts says. Bruno Boissonnet/Science Source hide caption

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Bruno Boissonnet/Science Source
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The Perils Of Pushing Kids Too Hard, And How Parents Can Learn To Back Off

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Alyson Hurt/NPR

CDC: U.S. Suicide Rates Have Climbed Dramatically

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Marina Muun for NPR

Her Son Is One Of The Few Children To Have 3 Parents' DNA

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A scientist from the Nadiya Clinic in Kiev, Ukraine inserts a needle into a fertilized egg to extract the DNA of a man and woman trying to have a baby. The clinic is combining the DNA from three different people to create babies for women who are infertile. Rob Stein/NPR hide caption

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Rob Stein/NPR

Clinic Claims Success In Making Babies With 3 Parents' DNA

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A genetic test could spare many women with a common form of breast cancer from receiving chemotherapy. SPL/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Science Source

Doctors Scrutinize Overtreatment, As Cancer Death Rates Decline

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