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Various forms of dementia can take very different courses, so it's important to get the right diagnosis. Mehau Kulyk/Science Source hide caption

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Mehau Kulyk/Science Source

Is It Alzheimer's Or Another Dementia? The Right Answer Matters

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A study found that consuming two eggs per day was linked to a 27 percent higher risk of developing heart disease. But many experts say this new finding is no justification to drop eggs from your diet. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

There can be as many as 35 different inactive ingredients inside a medicine. Monty Rakusen/Getty Images hide caption

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Monty Rakusen/Getty Images

Overlooked Ingredients In Medicines Can Sometimes Trigger Side Effects

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For most of us, the benefits of a walk greatly outweigh the risks, doctors say. Get off the couch now. Elena Bandurka /EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Elena Bandurka /EyeEm/Getty Images

Walk Your Dog, But Watch Your Footing: Bone Breaks Are On The Rise

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Lesley McClurg sits on the floor of her home in Oakland, Calif., reading a birthing book. McClurg has been taking the time to decide between having a home birth or a hospital birth. Lindsey Moore/KQED hide caption

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Lindsey Moore/KQED

Home Birth Can Be Appealing, But How Safe Is It?

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BrittLee Bowman competes during a recent cyclecross race. She was diagnosed with breast cancer and faced a decision on how to treat it. Courtesy of Dan Chabanov hide caption

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Courtesy of Dan Chabanov

Cancer Leads Athlete To Tough Choice

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A nurse holds a tetanus, diphtheria and whooping cough vaccine in 2016. Physician Judith Guzman-Cottrill tells NPR that she has met many families who hesitate to give their children vaccines. Lucy Nicholson/Reuters hide caption

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Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

Jonah Reeder prepares a special protein shake that helps him manage a metabolic condition called phenylketonuria. Julia Ritchey/KUER hide caption

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Julia Ritchey/KUER

A Gulp Of Genetically Modified Bacteria Might Someday Treat A Range Of Illnesses

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A color-enhanced scanning electron micrograph shows HIV particles (orange) infecting a T cell, one of the white blood cells that play a central role in the immune system. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

Bone Marrow Transplant Renders Second Patient Free Of HIV

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Hundreds of health care providers around the United States allow their patients to use Apple's Health app to store their medical records. Apple hide caption

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Apple

Storing Health Records On Your Phone: Can Apple Live Up To Its Privacy Values?

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The common practice of double-booking a lead surgeon's time and letting junior physicians supervise and complete some parts of a surgery is safe for most patients, a study of more than 60,000 operations finds. But there may be a small added risk for a subset of patients. Ian Lishman/Getty Images hide caption

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Ian Lishman/Getty Images

Carol Marley, a hospital nurse with private insurance, says coping with the financial fallout of her pancreatic cancer has been exhausting. Anna Gorman/KHN hide caption

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Anna Gorman/KHN

Cancer Complications: Confusing Bills, Maddening Errors And Endless Phone Calls

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Jeannette Parker, an animal-loving biologist, stopped to feed a stray cat in a rural area outside Florida's Everglades National Park. Instead of showing appreciation, the cat bit her. Angel Valentín for KHN hide caption

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Angel Valentín for KHN

Cat Bites The Hand That Feeds; Hospital Bills $48,512

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A child takes in the sights under blooming Japanese cherry trees at the Bispebjerg Cemetery in Copenhagen, Denmark. Mads Claus Rasmussen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mads Claus Rasmussen/AFP/Getty Images
Ariel Davis for NPR

Anger Can Be Contagious — Here's How To Stop The Spread

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CVS plans to transform some of its stores into "health hubs," retail locations revamped to include more health care services and products. One of the first is in Spring, Texas, a suburb of Houston. Alison Kodjak/NPR hide caption

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Alison Kodjak/NPR

CVS Looks To Make Its Drugstores A Destination For Health Care

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