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This photo, provided by China National Space Administration via Xinhua News Agency, is the first image of the moon's far side ever taken from the surface. A Chinese spacecraft on Thursday made the first landing on the far side of the moon, state media said. Imaginechina via AP hide caption

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Imaginechina via AP

This enhanced color image of Ultima Thule was taken at a distance of 85,000 miles and highlights its reddish surface. The image on the right has a far higher spatial resolution. NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute hide caption

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NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

Left: the best current image of the minor planet known as Ultima Thule. Right: an illustration of one possible appearance of the distant object. Its rotation is shown in red. NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI; sketch courtesy of James Tuttle Keane hide caption

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NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI; sketch courtesy of James Tuttle Keane

The Chinese lunar lander Chang'e 4 is headed to Aitken Basin, a large impact crater near the moon's south pole, pictured here in blue. The distance from the depths of Aitken Basin to the tops of the highest surrounding peaks is nearly twice the height of Mount Everest, according to NASA. NASA/Goddard hide caption

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NASA/Goddard

China's Lunar Lander To Explore Moon's Far Side

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An artist's impression of NASA's New Horizons spacecraft encountering Ultima Thule, a Kuiper Belt object that orbits 1 billion miles (1.6 billion kilometers) beyond Pluto, on Jan. 1, 2019. JPL/NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute/Steve Gribben hide caption

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JPL/NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute/Steve Gribben

Way Beyond Pluto, An Icy World Is Ready For Its Close-Up

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Astronomer Nancy Grace Roman, known as the "Mother" of Hubble, died at 93. Courtesy of NASA hide caption

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Courtesy of NASA

Nancy Grace Roman, 'Mother Of Hubble' Space Telescope, Has Died, At Age 93

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A cubesat, like this briefcase-sized MarCO, was key to relaying telemetry during the recent InSight mission to Mars. It was the first time this kind of mini-spacecraft had flown into deep space. FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images

What's Next For Tiny Satellites?

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The Korolev Crater in the northern lowlands of Mars is nearly 51 miles across and filled with ice. The photo was created from several images captured by the Mars Express spacecraft as it orbited the planet in April. Björn Schreiner/ESA/DLR/FU Berlin hide caption

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Björn Schreiner/ESA/DLR/FU Berlin

Lisa Nip on the TED stage. John Werner hide caption

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John Werner

Lisa Nip: How Can We Engineer The Human Body To Survive On Mars ... And Beyond?

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Could the building blocks of life exist elsewhere in our solar system? James Green hide caption

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James Green

James Green: Could The Building Blocks Of Life Exist Elsewhere In Our Solar System?

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Stephen Petranek TED hide caption

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TED

Stephen Petranek: How Will Humans Live On Mars?

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Lucianne Walkowicz on the TED stage. James Duncan Davidson/TED hide caption

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James Duncan Davidson/TED

Lucianne Walkowicz: Should We Be Using Mars As A Backup Planet?

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Vice President Pence announced the revival of the U.S. Space Command, saying Tuesday that it will oversee more than 18,000 military and civilian personnel who currently work "in space operations for our national security." White House/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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White House/Screenshot by NPR

Observers watch Virgin Galactic's SpaceshipTwo take off for a suborbital test flight of the VSS Unity in Mojave, Calif. The company marked a major milestone Thursday as Unity made it to a peak height of more than 51 miles, meeting the Federal Aviation Administration's definition of spaceflight. Gene Blevins/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Gene Blevins/AFP/Getty Images

Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko performs a spacewalk outside the International Space Station on Tuesday. Kononenko and Sergey Prokopyev are inspecting a section where a mysterious leak appeared on Aug. 30. NASA via AP hide caption

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NASA via AP

A NASA illustration depicts the positions of both Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 probes, now outside the heliosphere. Voyager 1 left the heliosphere in August 2012, while Voyager 2 left at a different location last month. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

Lately, Trevor Paglen has been designing satellites that serve a purely aesthetic function — that is, without military or communications purposes. This draft is the "Prototype for a Nonfunctional Satellite (Design 4; Build 4)." Courtesy of Altman Siegel Gallery and Metro Pictures. Trevor Paglen/Courtesy of Nevada Museum of Art hide caption

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Trevor Paglen/Courtesy of Nevada Museum of Art

NASA astronaut Anne McClain (from left), Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko and David Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency successfully blasted into space on Monday morning. It is the first mission since an aborted launch in October. Kirill Kudryavtsev /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kirill Kudryavtsev /AFP/Getty Images

NASA engineers on the flight team celebrate the InSight spacecraft's successful landing on Mars at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., on Monday. Al Seib/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Seib/AFP/Getty Images

NASA Probe Lands Safely On Martian Surface

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A total solar eclipse. David Baron hide caption

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David Baron

David Baron: Why Should You Experience A Total Solar Eclipse?

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