Science The latest health and science news. Updates on medicine, healthy living, nutrition, drugs, diet, and advances in science and technology. Subscribe to the Health & Science podcast.

Pruitt Proposes EPA Science Restrictions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/605596969/605596970" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt claims the new rule will strengthen transparency. Scientific organizations worry it will exclude valuable data from EPA's rule-making process. Jason Andrew/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jason Andrew/Getty Images

Carrie and Emma Buck in 1924, right before the Buck v. Bell trial, which provided the first court approval of a law allowing forced sterilization in Virginia. M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives, University at Albany, SUNY hide caption

toggle caption
M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives, University at Albany, SUNY

Emma, Carrie, Vivian: How A Family Became A Test Case For Forced Sterilizations

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/604926914/605121029" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

LeeAnne Walters, a recipient of the Goldman Environmental Prize, was key in exposing the crisis of lead-laced water in Flint, Mich. Michael Gleason/The Goldman Environmental Prize hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Gleason/The Goldman Environmental Prize

A sample of cannabidiol (CBD) oil is dropped into water. Supplements containing the marijuana extract are popular and widely sold as remedies for a variety of ailments and aches. But scientific evidence that they work hasn't yet caught up for most applications, researchers say. Stefan Wermuth/Bloomberg Creative Photos/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Stefan Wermuth/Bloomberg Creative Photos/Getty Images

Anxiety Relief Without The High? New Studies On CBD, A Cannabis Extract

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/604307015/604854319" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Zoologist Lucy Cooke says we infantilize pandas because they look cute. "We don't think of them as bears," she says. "We think of them as helpless evolutionary mishaps." Though captive breeding programs get a lot of press, she wishes that there were more emphasis on maintaining their natural habitat. Above, panda cubs at a conservation center in Wenchuan in China's southwestern Sichuan province. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
AFP/AFP/Getty Images

Who Cares If They're Cute? This Zoologist Accepts Animals On Their Own Terms

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/604121405/604702101" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In a study of nearly 5,600 U.S. youths ages 12 to 17, about 6 percent say they've engaged in some sort of digital self-harm. More than half in that subgroup say they've bullied themselves this way more than once. Jasmin Merdan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jasmin Merdan/Getty Images

First responders in the Marina District disaster zone after an earthquake on October 17, 1989 in San Francisco, Calif. Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images

Betting On Artificial Intelligence To Guide Earthquake Response

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/595564470/604423995" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image of the Lagoon Nebula, which is about 4,000 light-years away. It was taken by Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3 in February. The image was released to celebrate the 28th anniversary of Hubble. NASA, ESA, STScI hide caption

toggle caption
NASA, ESA, STScI

A sign notifies people they are standing on the Hayward Fault in the children's zoo area of the Oakland Zoo in Oakland, Calif. Ben Margot/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ben Margot/AP

Quake On Bay Area Fault Could Kill Hundreds, USGS Simulation Shows

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/604291821/604298861" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Tim Ma prepares a duck confit salad at his restaurant, Kyirisan, in Washington, D.C. Ma says being mindful about reducing food waste is an integral part of his philosophy in the kitchen — not just for environmental reasons but also for profitability. Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Becky Harlan/NPR

In the fall of 2017, left, Stream Tracker volunteer John Hammond found this creek near Fort Collins, Colo., to be dry. A year later, it was flowing again. Kira Puntenney-Desmond/Colorado State University hide caption

toggle caption
Kira Puntenney-Desmond/Colorado State University

How Pokemon Inspired A Citizen Science Project To Monitor Tiny Streams

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/597972310/604241546" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript