In "The Fish on My Plate," author and fisherman Paul Greenberg sets out to answer the question "what fish should I eat that's good for me and good for the planet?" As part of his quest to investigate the health of the ocean — and his own — Greenberg spent a year eating seafood at breakfast, lunch and dinner. Courtesy of FRONTLINE hide caption

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Courtesy of FRONTLINE

Hacking Lake Erie: Tech Competition Seeks Solutions To Water-Related Problems

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Astronaut Peggy Whitson Breaks NASA Record For Most Days In Space

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Voices From The March For Science

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Cassini Spacecraft Heads To Saturn

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Reinford Farms has 700 dairy cows. As you can imagine, they produce a lot of ... um... material to be converted into electricity. Dani Fresh for WHYY hide caption

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Dani Fresh for WHYY

Out Of The Lab And Into The Streets, Science Community Marches For Science

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Henrietta Lacks (Goldsberry) died from cancer at the age of 31, leaving behind four children. Quantrell Colbert/HBO hide caption

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Quantrell Colbert/HBO

Renée Elise Goldsberry Hopes 'Henrietta Lacks' Movie Will Start Conversations

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Bill Nye the Science Guy arrives to lead scientists and supporters down Constitution Avenue during the March for Science on Saturday in Washington, D.C. The event is being described as a call to support and safeguard the scientific community. Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images

In A New 'Anti-Science' Era, Bill Nye 'Saves The World' With Same Optimism

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Can Placebos Work If You Know They're Placebos?

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The "talking piece" is held by whoever has the floor at the moment to share their feelings on climate change with the Good Grief group. Judy Fahys/KUER hide caption

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Judy Fahys/KUER

First Step To 'Eco-Grieving' Over Climate Change? Admit There's A Problem

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An Organizer Speaks About Reasons For A 'March For Science'

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