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Rosemary Grant is a registered nurse and helps coordinate sepsis care at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle. The center's goal, she says, is to get a patient who might be developing sepsis antibiotics within three hours. Ian C. Bates for NPR hide caption

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Ian C. Bates for NPR

Synergy Between Nurses And Automation Could Be Key To Finding Sepsis Early

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Activists participate in the Take Back The Workplace March and #MeToo Survivors March & Rally on Nov. 12, 2017, in Hollywood, Calif. A new survey offers the first set of nationwide data on prevalence, showing that the problem is pervasive and women are most often the victims. Sarah Morris/Getty Images hide caption

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Kristopher Kelly near his home in Concrete, Wash., in February. He broke his pelvis and all his ribs in a work accident last year. The resulting infection he developed in the hospital almost killed him. Ian C. Bates for NPR hide caption

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Ian C. Bates for NPR

Did An IV Cocktail Of Vitamins And Drugs Save This Lumberjack From Sepsis?

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Gary Nabhan holds white tepary beans grown at his home in Patagonia, Ariz. Nabhan believes that drought-tolerant teparies could become a solution for growing food in a hotter and drier Arizona. Mariana Dale/KJZZ hide caption

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Mariana Dale/KJZZ

Shaorong Deng gets an experimental treatment for cancer of the esophagus that uses his own immune system cells. They have been genetically modified with the gene-editing technique known as CRISPR. Yuhan Xu/NPR hide caption

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Yuhan Xu/NPR

Doctors In China Lead Race To Treat Cancer By Editing Genes

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Cherry blossom trees, known as sakura, flourished in Japan. Fairchild imported several dozen trees for his own property in Chevy Chase, Md., and after seeing how much people liked them, he helped negotiate a larger shipment of trees to be planted around the Tidal Basin near the Washington Monument. David Fairchild/Fairchild Tropical Botanical Garden hide caption

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David Fairchild/Fairchild Tropical Botanical Garden

Like Lemons? Quinoa? Thank This Food Explorer For Bringing Them To Your Plate

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Hidden Brain: A Study Of Airline Delays

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Humpback whales are among the animals that could be affected by seismic surveys for oil and gas. Barcroft Media/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Seismic Surveys Planned Off U.S. Coast Pose Risk To Marine Life

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UMass food scientists Lynne McLandsborough, left, and Lili He are researching ways to use your smartphone to detect bacteria in food. Karen Brown/New England Public Radio hide caption

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Karen Brown/New England Public Radio

Virginia Harrod, an attorney and county prosecutor who lives in rural Kentucky, survived breast cancer, only to develop lymphedema, which sent her to the hospital three times with serious infections. A lymph node transplant helped restore her immune system. Luke Sharrett for NPR hide caption

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Luke Sharrett for NPR

She Survived Breast Cancer, But Says A Treatment Side Effect 'Almost Killed' Her

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Abraham Vidaurre, 12, checks his arm after receiving an HPV vaccination at Amistad Community Health Center in Corpus Christi, Texas, in 2016. Though gender differences in vaccine rates have narrowed, more girls than boys tend to get immunized against HPV. The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images

This Vaccine Can Prevent Cancer, But Many Teenagers Still Don't Get It

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This light micrograph of a part of a brain affected by Alzheimer's disease shows an accumulation of darkened plaques, which have molecules called amyloid-beta at their core. Once dismissed as all bad, amyloid-beta might actually be a useful part of the immune system, some scientists now suspect — until the brain starts making too much. Martin M. Rotker/Science Source hide caption

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Martin M. Rotker/Science Source

Smallpox virus, colorized and magnified in this micrograph 42,000 times, is the real concern for biologists working on a cousin virus — horsepox. They're hoping to develop a better vaccine against smallpox, should that human scourge ever be used as a bioweapon. Chris Bjornberg/Science Source hide caption

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Chris Bjornberg/Science Source

Did Pox Virus Research Put Potential Profits Ahead of Public Safety?

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The link between science and superheroes is evident in Marvel Studios' Black Panther. Science is why T'Challa's nation, Wakanda, is globally preeminent. Marvel Studios 2018 hide caption

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Marvel Studios 2018

Simone Groper got her flu shot in January at a Walgreens pharmacy in San Francisco. Flu season will likely last a few more weeks, health officials say, and immunization can still minimize your chances of getting seriously sick. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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