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California is starting to push hospitals throughout the state to lower their rates of medically unnecessary C-sections. Thanasis Zovoilis/Getty Images hide caption

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Thanasis Zovoilis/Getty Images

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt announcing his decision in April to scrap Obama administration fuel economy standards. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

DNA isolated from a small sample of saliva or blood can yield information, fairly inexpensively, about a person's relative risk of developing dozens of diseases or medical conditions. GIPhotoStock/Cultura RF/Getty Images hide caption

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GIPhotoStock/Cultura RF/Getty Images

Laura Ogden, Jack Hannan, and Dr. Jones the dog. Courtesy of Laura Ogden hide caption

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Courtesy of Laura Ogden

Rewinding & Rewriting: The Alternate Universes in Our Heads

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The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission, shown in an artist's rendering, will measure tiny fluctuations in Earth's gravitational field to show how water moves around the planet. NASA/JPL hide caption

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NASA/JPL

NASA Launching New Satellites To Measure Earth's Lumpy Gravity

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Mike Stone, left, and Andy Sherman in the pumping station for Hannibal, Mo., during a flood in 1993. The city has since constructed a flood wall, and flood managers have built up levees to protect against flooding. But scientists warn those structures are making flooding worse. Cliff Schiappa/AP hide caption

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Cliff Schiappa/AP

California Game Warden Pat Freeling replants stolen succulents along the Mendocino coastline. Courtesy of Pat Freeling hide caption

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Courtesy of Pat Freeling

The Case Of The Stolen Succulents

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Magdalena Skipper Is Named New Chief Of 'Nature'

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The USDA has released several options for what the labels might look like. Department of Agriculture hide caption

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Department of Agriculture

USDA Unveils Prototypes For GMO Food Labels, And They're ... Confusing

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Since early 2013, 110 chimpanzees have been retired to Chimp Haven sanctuary in Keithville, La., from the New Iberia Research Center in Lafayette, La. That's the largest group of government-owned chimps ever sent to sanctuary. Sabrina, seen here, arrived at Chimp Haven in 2013. Brandon Wade/AP Images for The Humane Society hide caption

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Brandon Wade/AP Images for The Humane Society

A southern white rhino named Victoria is two months pregnant. Barbara Durrant, director of reproductive sciences at the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, announced the news on Thursday. Julie Watson/AP hide caption

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Julie Watson/AP

Marines based in Okinawa, Japan, fire an M136 AT-4 rocket launcher as part of a weapons training exercise on the Kaneohe Bay Range Training Facility, in 2014. Lance Cpl. Matthew Bragg/U.S. Marines/DVIDS hide caption

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Lance Cpl. Matthew Bragg/U.S. Marines/DVIDS

Army 'Leans In' To Protect A Shooter's Brain From Blast Injury

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California To Require All New Homes To Have Solar Panels Starting In 2020

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Starbucks is closing more than 8,000 U.S. stores on the afternoon of May 29 to conduct racial-bias training. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Starbucks Training Focuses On The Evolving Study Of Unconscious Bias

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An image provided by NOAA shows the hole in the ozone layer in 2015. NOAA scientists now say emissions of one ozone-depleting chemical appear to be rising, even though the chemical has been banned and reported production has essentially been at zero for years. NOAA via AP hide caption

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NOAA via AP

Austin Steeves packages lobsters after hauling traps on his grandfather's boat in Casco Bay, Portland, Maine. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Warming Waters Push Fish To Cooler Climes, Out Of Some Fishermen's Reach

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