Science The latest health and science news. Updates on medicine, healthy living, nutrition, drugs, diet, and advances in science and technology. Subscribe to the Health & Science podcast.

Science

People were more likely to try mealworms — such as these mealworm chocolate truffles sprinkled with coconut — when the ad focused on taste and experience, a study showed. Oliver Brachat/for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Oliver Brachat/for NPR

A bit of lapis lazuli — a rich blue pigment — is trapped within a central tooth's dental tartar on this lower jaw of a European woman who died sometime between A.D. 997 and 1162. Christina Warinner/Science Advances hide caption

toggle caption
Christina Warinner/Science Advances

A Blue Clue In Medieval Teeth May Bespeak A Woman's Artistry Circa A.D. 1000

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/683283982/683732144" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Prime Minister Narendra Modi (center) attends the opening of the 106th Indian Science Congress at Lovely Professional University on last week in Jalandhar, India. Pardeep Pandit/Hindustan Times via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pardeep Pandit/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

As the economy boomed, emissions rose sharply in 2018. Shipping was one source of the increase. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mario Tama/Getty Images

U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions Are Once Again On The Rise

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/683258294/683339750" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A bag to collect forensic evidence is seen as the New York City Office of Chief Medical Examiner hosts a demonstration of technology that allows them to test degraded DNA samples. Angela Weiss/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Angela Weiss/AFP/Getty Images

Using Genetic Genealogy To Identify Unknown Crime Victims, Sometimes Decades Later

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/682925589/683339756" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This granary weevil has set up shop inside a kernel. Even without wings, these stealthy stowaways — with the help of humans — have managed to infest grains all over the world for thousands of years. Biophoto Associates/Getty Images/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Biophoto Associates/Getty Images/Science Source

George, the last known Achatinella apexfulva, a Hawaiian land snail, died on New Year's Day. David Sischo/Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources hide caption

toggle caption
David Sischo/Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources

Scientists have re-engineered photosynthesis, the foundation of life on Earth, creating genetically modified plants that grow faster and bigger. Above, scientists measure how well modified tobacco plants photosynthesize compared to unmodified plants. Haley Ahlers/RIPE Project hide caption

toggle caption
Haley Ahlers/RIPE Project

Scientists Have 'Hacked Photosynthesis' In Search Of More Productive Crops

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/681941779/682133781" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This photo, provided by China National Space Administration via Xinhua News Agency, is the first image of the moon's far side ever taken from the surface. A Chinese spacecraft on Thursday made the first landing on the far side of the moon, state media said. Imaginechina via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Imaginechina via AP

This enhanced color image of Ultima Thule was taken at a distance of 85,000 miles and highlights its reddish surface. The image on the right has a far higher spatial resolution. NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

Toni Hoy, at her home in Rantoul, Ill., holds a childhood photo of her son, Daniel, who is now 24. In a last-ditch effort to get Daniel treatment for his severe mental illness in 2007, the Hoys surrendered parental custody to the state. "When I think of him, that's the picture I see in my mind. Just this adorable, blue-eyed, blond little sweetie," Hoy says. Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media hide caption

toggle caption
Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media

To Get Mental Health Help For A Child, Desperate Parents Relinquish Custody

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/673765794/681794799" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Cristina Scholl, first-grade teacher at Lincoln Elementary, uses a curriculum that mixes teacher-directed whole-class phonics lessons with small-group activities. Emily Hanford/APM Reports hide caption

toggle caption
Emily Hanford/APM Reports

Winter swimmers enjoyed an icy dip in Poland's Garczyn lake last February. Recorded air temperature was around 14 degrees Farenheit, and a large ice hole had to be cut to allow the lake bathing. NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
NurPhoto/Getty Images

The Chinese lunar lander Chang'e 4 is headed to Aitken Basin, a large impact crater near the moon's south pole, pictured here in blue. The distance from the depths of Aitken Basin to the tops of the highest surrounding peaks is nearly twice the height of Mount Everest, according to NASA. NASA/Goddard hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/Goddard

China's Lunar Lander To Explore Moon's Far Side

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/680542096/681368207" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A young Maya Shankar. Courtesy of Maya Shankar hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Maya Shankar

Loss and Renewal: Moving Forward After A Door Closes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/680679054/680750494" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Though his politics are right of center and he lobbied hard against the Affordable Care Act, Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch also has been key to passing several landmark health laws with bipartisan support. Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bloomberg/Getty Images

How Sen. Orrin Hatch Shaped America's Health Care In Controversial Ways

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/673851375/681125070" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript