Research News New advances in science, medicine, health, and technology.Stem cell research, drug research, and new treatments for disease.

A tick grasping a dinosaur feather is preserved in 99 million-year-old amber from Myanmar. Peñalver et al/Nature Communications hide caption

toggle caption
Peñalver et al/Nature Communications

Amber-Trapped Tick Suggests Ancient Bloodsuckers Feasted On Feathered Dinosaurs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/569949770/570387526" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Michele Comisky of Vienna, Va., enrolled her 8-year-old son, Jackson, in a study to test the value of probiotics in preventing the gut distress often experienced when taking antibiotics. Rob Stein/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Rob Stein/NPR

Could Probiotics Protect Kids From A Downside Of Antibiotics?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/567746569/569815415" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Australia had a particularly hard flu season this year, which may predict similar challenges for the U.S. Pascal Pochard-Casabianca/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pascal Pochard-Casabianca/AFP/Getty Images

In The U.S., Flu Season Could Be Unusually Harsh This Year

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/569379155/569983815" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ben Anderson collects grass samples in Western Australia. Spinifex tastes to some like salt and vinegar chips — but it's so hard and spiky that scientists say collecting samples can be painful. Courtesy of Matt Barrett hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Matt Barrett

Sales surged for guns, such as these seen at a show in Kenner, La., in late 2012, after the mass shooting in Newtown, Conn. Julie Dermansky/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Julie Dermansky/Corbis via Getty Images
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Even Low-Dose Contraceptives Slightly Increase Breast Cancer Risk

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/568836583/568920367" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Brahman cattle graze in a field in Innisfail, Queensland, Australia. Researchers can estimate the greenhouse gas emissions and land used to produce various foods in different parts of the world. They've used that data to calculate the environmental impact of a shift in what people eat. David Messent/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David Messent/Getty Images

A peregrine falcon in Germany. A new study finds the birds are able to dive at high speeds and catch moving prey using a mathematical principle that also guides missiles. Sebastian Willnow/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sebastian Willnow/AFP/Getty Images
Simone Golob/Getty Images

New Drugs Could Prevent Migraine Headaches For Some People

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/567804150/568255254" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Sean Murphy/Getty Images

How Birth Order Relates To Job Success

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/567688882/567688883" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rats have been a persistent problem for cities around the world. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
AFP/AFP/Getty Images

The Genetic Divide Between NYC's Uptown And Downtown Rats

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/567572989/567572990" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Artist's rendition of a family of pterosaurs, which had massive wingspans of up to 13 feet and likely ate fish with their large teeth-filled jaws. Illustrated by Zhao Chuang hide caption

toggle caption
Illustrated by Zhao Chuang

A coalition of mental health advocacy groups is calling on federal regulators, state agencies and employers to conduct random audits of insurers to make sure they are in compliance with the federal Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008. Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

toggle caption
Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Women's Role In The European Agricultural Revolution Revealed

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/567332015/567404333" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Bacterial cells can now read a synthetic genetic code and use it to assemble proteins containing man-made parts. Gary Bates/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Gary Bates/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Scientists Train Bacteria To Build Unnatural Proteins

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/567171158/567313615" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Pasieka/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Gene Therapy Shows Promise For A Growing List Of Diseases

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/565728869/567155749" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript