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"Feeling better isn't just this selfish, hedonic thing — it actually is fuel. I consider energy from taking care of yourself as essential fuel for the things that matter most in our lives," says Michelle Segar, a psychologist at the University of Michigan who studies how we sustain healthy behaviors like exercise. Saviour Giyorges / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm Premium hide caption

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Saviour Giyorges / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm Premium

From Couch Potato To Fitness Buff: How I Learned To Love Exercise

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Babies of moms who are in the ICU with severe flu have a greater chance of being born premature and underweight. Nenov/Getty Images hide caption

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Nenov/Getty Images

Severe Flu Raises Risk Of Birth Problems For Pregnant Women, Babies

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People were more likely to try mealworms — such as these mealworm chocolate truffles sprinkled with coconut — when the ad focused on taste and experience, a study showed. Oliver Brachat/for NPR hide caption

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Oliver Brachat/for NPR

A bit of lapis lazuli — a rich blue pigment — is trapped within a central tooth's dental tartar on this lower jaw of a European woman who died sometime between A.D. 997 and 1162. Christina Warinner/Science Advances hide caption

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Christina Warinner/Science Advances

A Blue Clue In Medieval Teeth May Bespeak A Woman's Artistry Circa A.D. 1000

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Scientists have re-engineered photosynthesis, the foundation of life on Earth, creating genetically modified plants that grow faster and bigger. Above, scientists measure how well modified tobacco plants photosynthesize compared to unmodified plants. Haley Ahlers/RIPE Project hide caption

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Haley Ahlers/RIPE Project

Scientists Have 'Hacked Photosynthesis' In Search Of More Productive Crops

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Cristina Scholl, first-grade teacher at Lincoln Elementary, uses a curriculum that mixes teacher-directed whole-class phonics lessons with small-group activities. Emily Hanford/APM Reports hide caption

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Emily Hanford/APM Reports

Winter swimmers enjoyed an icy dip in Poland's Garczyn lake last February. Recorded air temperature was around 14 degrees Farenheit, and a large ice hole had to be cut to allow the lake bathing. NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/Getty Images

Researchers say human brains can become overwhelmed by cute traits, such as large eyes and small noses, embodied by movie characters like Bambi. Disney Junior/Disney Channel via Getty Images hide caption

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Disney Junior/Disney Channel via Getty Images

When Too Cute Is Too Much, The Brain Can Get Aggressive

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Kristen Uroda for NPR

If You Feel Thankful, Write It Down. It's Good For Your Health

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Research inspired by soccer headers has led to fresh insights into how the brain weathers hits to the head. Photo illustration by David Madison/Getty Images hide caption

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Photo illustration by David Madison/Getty Images

Bad Vibes: How Hits To The Head Are Transferred To The Brain

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A study found that parachutes were no more effective than empty backpacks at protecting jumpers from aircraft. There was just one catch. Michael Htten/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Htten/EyeEm/Getty Images

Researchers Show Parachutes Don't Work, But There's A Catch

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The Korolev Crater in the northern lowlands of Mars is nearly 51 miles across and filled with ice. The photo was created from several images captured by the Mars Express spacecraft as it orbited the planet in April. Björn Schreiner/ESA/DLR/FU Berlin hide caption

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Björn Schreiner/ESA/DLR/FU Berlin

Before light reaches these rods and cones in the retina, it passes through some specialized cells that send signals to brain areas that affect whether you feel happy or sad. Omikron /Getty Images/Science Source hide caption

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Omikron /Getty Images/Science Source

Scientists Find A Brain Circuit That Could Explain Seasonal Depression

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The initial test for hepatitis C is an inexpensive blood test to check for antibodies that indicate the person's been exposed to the virus. If that antibody test is positive, a second test is done to see if the virus is circulating in the bloodstream — a sign there's an infection that needs treatment. BSIP/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG/Getty Images

U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams said Tuesday that local restrictions, including bans on indoor vaping, are needed to reduce youth e-cigarette use. Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images

Seven-year-old Carson Miller (left), and his brother, 5-year-old Chase Miller (right), both have a degenerative brain disease called MEPAN syndrome. There are only 13 people in the world who have it. Courtesy of Andrew Ross-Perry hide caption

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Courtesy of Andrew Ross-Perry

Medical Detectives: The Last Hope For Families Coping With Rare Diseases

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Scientist He Jiankui was criticized by colleagues after his claim to have created gene-edited babies became public. Three leading scientific organizations are calling for more controls. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images

A highly potent synthetic opioid, fentanyl is often mixed into other drugs sold on the street, including pills, heroin and even cocaine. Towfiqu Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Towfiqu Photography/Getty Images

Sea ice is seen from NASA's Operation IceBridge research aircraft off the northwest coast of Greenland in March 2017. A new report says rapid warming over the past three decades has led to a 95 percent decline of the Arctic's oldest and thickest ice. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Arctic Report Card Documents 'Cascading Effects' Of Warming Ocean Temperatures

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