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Hidden Brain: A Study Of Airline Delays

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Virginia Harrod, an attorney and county prosecutor who lives in rural Kentucky, survived breast cancer, only to develop lymphedema, which sent her to the hospital three times with serious infections. A lymph node transplant helped restore her immune system. Luke Sharrett for NPR hide caption

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Luke Sharrett for NPR

She Survived Breast Cancer, But Says A Treatment Side Effect 'Almost Killed' Her

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Abraham Vidaurre, 12, checks his arm after receiving an HPV vaccination at Amistad Community Health Center in Corpus Christi, Texas, in 2016. Though gender differences in vaccine rates have narrowed, more girls than boys tend to get immunized against HPV. The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images

This Vaccine Can Prevent Cancer, But Many Teenagers Still Don't Get It

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This light micrograph of a part of a brain affected by Alzheimer's disease shows an accumulation of darkened plaques, which have molecules called amyloid-beta at their core. Once dismissed as all bad, amyloid-beta might actually be a useful part of the immune system, some scientists now suspect — until the brain starts making too much. Martin M. Rotker/Science Source hide caption

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Martin M. Rotker/Science Source

Smallpox virus, colorized and magnified in this micrograph 42,000 times, is the real concern for biologists working on a cousin virus — horsepox. They're hoping to develop a better vaccine against smallpox, should that human scourge ever be used as a bioweapon. Chris Bjornberg/Science Source hide caption

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Chris Bjornberg/Science Source

Did Pox Virus Research Put Potential Profits Ahead of Public Safety?

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Simone Groper got her flu shot in January at a Walgreens pharmacy in San Francisco. Flu season will likely last a few more weeks, health officials say, and immunization can still minimize your chances of getting seriously sick. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A Matabele ant treats the wounds of a mate whose limbs were bitten off during a fight with termite soldiers. Erik T. Frank/Julius Maximilian University of Würzburg hide caption

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Erik T. Frank/Julius Maximilian University of Würzburg

This is a sample photo taken with the 1-megapixel Quanta Image Sensor. Instead of pixels, QIS chips have what researchers call "jots." Each jot can detect a single particle of light. Jiaju Ma hide caption

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Jiaju Ma

Super Sensitive Sensor Sees What You Can't

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Warmer temperatures are making canola and possibly other brassica seedpods open too early, reducing crop yields. Andrew Davies/courtesy John Innes Centre hide caption

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Andrew Davies/courtesy John Innes Centre
Ryan Johnson for NPR

Smartphone Detox: How To Power Down In A Wired World

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The scientists tested tissue samples from the brains of deceased patients who had from autism, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Sebastian Kaulitzki/Getty Images/Science Photo Library RF hide caption

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Sebastian Kaulitzki/Getty Images/Science Photo Library RF

Major Neurological Conditions Have More In Common Than We Thought, Study Finds

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Antipsychotic drugs, such as haloperidol and risperidone are FDA-approved for treating schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, but can increase the risk of death in older people who have dementia. Bruno Ehrs/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruno Ehrs/Getty Images

Risky Antipsychotic Drugs Still Overprescribed In Nursing Homes

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Scientists say low chlorine levels in Flint's water system during the city's water crisis in 2014 and 2015 led the bacterium Legionella pneumophila to proliferate, causing a deadly outbreak of Legionnaire's disease. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

Lethal Pneumonia Outbreak Caused By Low Chlorine In Flint Water

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Bradley Martin is seen here in 1993 inspecting confiscated rhino horns, elephant tusks and ivory objects at the Taipei Zoo, in his role as a United Nations special envoy on rhino conservation. Tao Chuan Yeh/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tao Chuan Yeh/AFP/Getty Images
Meredith Miotke for NPR

Eating Leafy Greens Each Day Tied to Sharper Memory, Slower Decline

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A "space toilet" on display at Miraikan, The Emerging Museum of Science and Innovation in Tokyo, Japan in 2008. Chris Jackson/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Jackson/Getty Images

Making Space Food With Space Poop

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New treatments for migraines could change how physicians treat patients with the debilitating headaches. Photographer is my life/Getty Images hide caption

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Photographer is my life/Getty Images