Research News New advances in science, medicine, health, and technology.Stem cell research, drug research, and new treatments for disease.

A sample of cannabidiol (CBD) oil is dropped into water. Supplements containing the marijuana extract are popular and widely sold as remedies for a variety of ailments and aches. But scientific evidence that they work hasn't yet caught up for most applications, researchers say. Stefan Wermuth/Bloomberg Creative Photos/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefan Wermuth/Bloomberg Creative Photos/Getty Images

Anxiety Relief Without The High? New Studies On CBD, A Cannabis Extract

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In a study of nearly 5,600 U.S. youths ages 12 to 17, about 6 percent say they've engaged in some sort of digital self-harm. More than half in that subgroup say they've bullied themselves this way more than once. Jasmin Merdan/Getty Images hide caption

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Jasmin Merdan/Getty Images

First responders in the Marina District disaster zone after an earthquake on October 17, 1989 in San Francisco, Calif. Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images hide caption

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Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images

Betting On Artificial Intelligence To Guide Earthquake Response

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Researchers used a gene-carrying virus to fix blood stem cells that were then used to treat patients with beta-thalassemia. Power and Syred/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Power and Syred/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

There are variations in the appearance of severely bleached corals. Here, the coral displays pink fluorescing tissue signalling heat stress. ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies/ Gergely Torda hide caption

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ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies/ Gergely Torda

Climate Change Is Killing Coral On The Great Barrier Reef

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How do we make sense of all that chatter? Ilana Kohn/Getty Images hide caption

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Ilana Kohn/Getty Images

How People Learned To Recognize Monkey Calls Reveals How We All Make Sense Of Sound

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Eddies behind an A. salina shrimp swimming Isabel Houghton / J.R. Strickler /courtesy of Stanford / University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee hide caption

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Isabel Houghton / J.R. Strickler /courtesy of Stanford / University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Swarms Of Tiny Sea Creatures Are Powerful Enough To Mix Oceans, Study Finds

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Carolina Reapers are some of the hottest peppers in the world. So hot, in fact, that for one man, participating in a pepper-eating contestant resulted in a painful, serious "thunderclap headache." Maria Dattola Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Maria Dattola Photography/Getty Images

The Super-Hot Pepper That Sent A Man To The ER

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Loggerhead sea turtle hatchlings are packed into containers at the Gumbo Limbo Nature Center before being taken to a U.S. Coast Guard vessel for release in Boca Raton, Fla. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

Really Random Numbers

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Melodie Beckham (left), here with her daughter, Laura, had metastatic lung cancer and chose to stop taking medical marijuana after it failed to relieve her symptoms. She died a few weeks after this photo was taken. Melissa Bailey/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Melissa Bailey/Kaiser Health News

A prep cook at a San Francisco restaurant drops fish skin into a food scrap recycling container. Turning food waste into fertilizer is popular in parts of Europe and is catching on in the U.S. But tiny plastics are also making their way into that fertilizer — and into the food chain. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Another Place Plastics Are Turning Up: Organic Fertilizer From Food Waste

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Some beer makers are excited about the possibility of using modified yeast to flavor beer instead of hops, which require a lot of water to grow. Mint Images/Getty Images/Mint Images RF hide caption

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Mint Images/Getty Images/Mint Images RF

A tray of gluten-free pastries. For people with celiac disease, incidental ingestion of gluten can lead to painful symptoms and lasting intestinal damage. Two new studies suggest such exposure may be greater than many realize, even for those following gluten-free diets. JPM/Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

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JPM/Getty Images/Image Source

Not every great employee is a great manager. Camelia Dobrin/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Camelia Dobrin/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Why Is Your Boss Bad At His Job? It May Be The 'Peter Principle' At Work

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Gary Waters /Getty Images/Ikon Images

The Scarcity Trap: Why We Keep Digging When We're Stuck In A Hole

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Courtesy of Michael Rosnach/Harvard University

Failure To Save A Child In Wartime Inspires Wound-Healing Tech

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Cutting back up to 25 percent of your calories per day helps slow your metabolism and reduce free radicals that cause cell damage and aging. But would you want to? VisualField/Getty Images hide caption

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VisualField/Getty Images

You May Live Longer By Severely Restricting Calories, Scientists Say

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