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Attorney General William Barr appears before the House Judiciary Committee on July 28. Matt McClain/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Matt McClain/Pool/Getty Images

Democrats Worry Attorney General Has An 'October Surprise' In The Making

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Former Vice President Joe Biden, seen here at a speech in July in Delaware, has apologized for suggesting the African American community is not diverse. Mark Makela/Getty Images hide caption

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A North Carolina map is shown in Wake County Superior Court during a 2019 redistricting trial. Republicans and Democrats are preparing for a battle of state legislative supremacy that could have a big effect on political power for the next decade. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP

With Focus On Redistricting, Democrats Place New Emphasis On Statehouses

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Former Vice President Joe Biden, seen here during a July campaign event in Dunmore, Pa., told reporters that it would be up to the attorney general to decide whether to pursue criminal charges against President Trump once he leaves office. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

WATCH: Biden Says He Wouldn't Stand In The Way Of A Trump Prosecution

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Letitia James, New York's attorney general, pauses while speaking during a news conference on Aug. 6, 2020, where she announced a civil action seeking to dissolve the National Rifle Association. Peter Foley/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Foley/Bloomberg via Getty Images

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with Doug Ducey, the governor of Arizona, not pictured, on Wednesday. Doug Mills/New York Times/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Doug Mills/New York Times/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Rep. Raúl Grijalva, D-Ariz., (left) speaks before the start of a House Natural Resources Committee in June. Grijalva recently tested positive for the coronavirus. Bill Clark/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

As More Lawmakers Test Positive, Congress Gets A Tough Reminder Of Coronavirus Risk

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Pedestrians pass signs near a polling site in San Antonio in February. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Drive-Through Voting? Texas Gets Creative In Its Scramble For Polling Places

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Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine was tested as part of a protocol to meet with President Trump. His first test result was positive but the second was negative. Kirk Irwin/Getty Images hide caption

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Facebook said the president's claims violated its coronavirus misinformation policy, in a rare departure from the social network's largely hands-off approach to politicians. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Twitter, Facebook Remove Trump Post Over False Claim About Children And COVID-19

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"It's easy and I think it's a beautiful setting," President Trump said of giving his Republican renomination speech from the White House. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Poll workers must take extra precautions this year to protect themselves against the coronavirus. Election experts fear a massive shortage of workers at the polls in November. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Wanted: Young People To Work The Polls This November

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Presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden, seen here at a campaign event in July, says he won't tear down the border wall put in place during the Trump administration. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Senate Republicans Face Uphill Fight To Hold Majority

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Matthew Bruce of Des Moines, Iowa, signs a note during a Black Lives Matter demonstration outside Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds' office in June. The Republican governor has signed an executive order restoring voting rights to people convicted of a felony. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Governor Acts To Restore Voting Rights To Iowans With Felony Convictions

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Nika Cotton recently opened Soulcentricitea in Kansas City, Mo. When public schools shut down in the spring, Cotton had no one to watch her young children who are 8 and 10. So she quit her job in social work — and lost her health insurance — in order to start her own business. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith/KCUR

Former Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates arrived for a ceremony for FBI Director Christopher Wray in 2017. Yates is set to appear before a Senate panel looking into the Russia investigation. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP