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A Veterans Affairs Department hospital in Denver. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

Senate Passes $55 Billion Veterans Affairs Reform Bill

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Travis Brenda is a math teacher at Rockcastle County High School who ousted Jonathan Shell in a primary election Tuesday. Shell is a key member of the Republican leadership team that has orchestrated the teacher pension bill, the tax increases and the charter school bill. Wade Payne/AP hide caption

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Wade Payne/AP

President Trump speaks during the Susan B. Anthony List's 11th annual Campaign for Life Gala at the National Building Museum on Tuesday. President Trump addressed the annual gala of the anti-abortion group and urged people to vote in the midterm election. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Under legislation approved by the House on Tuesday, SunTrust and other banks with up to $250 billion in assets could be exempted from the toughest rules of the Dodd-Frank law. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Congress Rolls Back Part Of Dodd-Frank, Easing Rules For Midsize, Smaller Banks

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President Trump meets with South Korean President Moon Jae-in on Tuesday in the Oval Office of the White House. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Trump Warns Summit With North Korea May Not Happen On Schedule

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The Food and Drug Administration approves more than 99 percent of applications for compassionate use of experimental medicines. But supporters of a right-to-try law want a more direct approach. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (left) confers with House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy during a May 16 news conference. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

To Quell Growing Rebellion, House GOP Leaders Promise Action On Immigration In June

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Roger Stone says that he is prepared for a Justice Department indictment if one appears but that investigators ultimately will find that he has done nothing wrong. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Amid Lawsuits And Circling Feds, Stone Rejects What He Calls A Scheme To Silence Him

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Former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper testifies about Russian interference in the 2016 election before a Senate Judiciary Committee subcommittee in May 2017. Eric Thayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Thayer/Getty Images

President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama wait to greet Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi and his wife, Agnese Landini, for a State Dinner at the White House in Washington in 2016. Netflix says it has reached a deal with the Obamas to produce material for the streaming service. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

People wait in line to enter the U.S. Supreme Court last month. The court sided with businesses on not allowing class-action lawsuits for federal labor violations. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Supreme Court Decision Delivers Blow To Workers' Rights

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Richard Goodwin (left) worked for John F. Kennedy, first on his presidential campaign and then in the White House. He also wrote influential speeches for President Lyndon Johnson. Goodwin is seen here with Ted Sorensen (center) and Myer Feldman. Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann Archive

Supporters of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump watch as Fox News projects him the winner in Florida on Nov. 8, 2016. Fox is joining the Associated Press in a new experiment to measure voter preferences, which will be key to their projections on election night in 2018. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Former Massey CEO and West Virginia Senatorial candidate, Don Blankenship, speaks during a town hall to kick off his GOP campaign in Logan, W.Va., on Jan. 18, 2018. After losing the Republican primary, Blankenship says he'll run under the Constitution Party banner. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Stacey Evans (left) and Stacey Abrams (right), the two candidates running for governor in the Georgia Democratic primary on May 22. They have plenty of similarities: they're both women named Stacey; they're both former legislators in the Georgia House of Representatives; they're both lawyers; and they're both calling for similar progressive policies, such as expanding Medicaid. Asma Khalid/NPR hide caption

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Asma Khalid/NPR

People watch a TV showing images of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un (right), South Korean President Moon Jae-in and U.S. President Donald Trump — and the words "Thawing Korean Peninsula" — at a railway station in Seoul, South Korea on March 7. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

As Trump-Kim Summit Approaches, South Korea's Leader Heads To White House

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(Top) Britnee Kinard's husband, Hamilton, has a brain injury and PTSD. She got kicked off the program by the Charleston VA in 2014. (Left) Hamilton's daily medication. (Right) His uniform in the closet at their home in Richmond Hill, Ga. Eva Verbeeck for NPR hide caption

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Eva Verbeeck for NPR

VA's Caregiver Program Still Dropping Veterans With Disabilities

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