In Delaware, State Senate Election Turns Into Referendum On Trump

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Kate Noble speaks to voters at a listening session at Gonzales Community School in Santa Fe, N.M. She ran for a seat on the Santa Fe Public Schools Board. Megan Kamerick/KUNM hide caption

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Megan Kamerick/KUNM

Trump's Election Drives More Women To Consider Running For Office

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The Federico F. Peña Southwest Family Health Center opened in 2016 to serve a low-income community in Denver. The clinic and its parent system, Denver Health, have benefited financially from the Affordable Care Act and its expansion of Medicaid. John Daley / Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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John Daley / Colorado Public Radio

Craig Britton once paid $18,000 a year in premiums for health insurance he bought through Minnesota's "high risk pool." He calls the argument that these pools can bring down the cost of monthly premiums "a lot of baloney." Mark Zdehchlik / MPR News hide caption

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Mark Zdehchlik / MPR News

GOP Leaders Urge Return To 'High-Risk Insurance Pools' That Critics Call Costly

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The state Capitol in Denver in December. The Grand Junction Sentinel has threatened to sue state Sen. Ray Scott after the lawmaker accused the paper of spreading "fake news." Chris Schneider/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hundreds of demonstrators on the Iowa Capitol's Rotunda floor protest a bill that would restrict collective bargaining for local and state government workers. John Pemble/Iowa Public Radio hide caption

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John Pemble/Iowa Public Radio

Iowa Moves To Restrict Collective Bargaining For Public Sector Workers

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Mary Lynne Bill-Old Coyote, Montana's director of Indian health, says the ACA has helped build the community by providing job opportunities. Montana saw 3 percent growth last year in the number of health care jobs. Courtesy of Thom Bridge/Helena Independent Record hide caption

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Courtesy of Thom Bridge/Helena Independent Record

Obamacare Brought Jobs To Indian Country That Could Vanish With Repeal

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Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson speaks at a Feb 3. news conference outside U.S. District Court, Western Washington, in Seattle. Ferguson filed a state lawsuit challenging key sections of President Trump's immigration executive order. Karen Ducey/Getty Images hide caption

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The Attorney General Behind The Resistance To Trump's Travel Ban

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Protesters opposing the proposed Dakota Access Pipeline at the Oceti Sakowin Camp in North Dakota. Lawmakers in the state have proposed bills that would increase penalties for protesters who block highways. Michael Nigro/Getty Images hide caption

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Bills Across The Country Could Increase Penalties For Protesters

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The first session of the New Hampshire House on Jan. 4, 2017, in Concord. The chamber will soon consider legislation that will likely curtail the financial strength of labor unions. Elise Amendola/AP hide caption

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Elise Amendola/AP

Labor Unions Appear Set For More State-Level Defeats In 2017

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If passed by voters, the "California Nationhood. Initiative Constitutional Amendment and Statute" would remove state constitutional language making California part of the U.S. and require the governor to request admission to the United Nations. George Rose/Getty Images hide caption

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Vanessa Ramirez was diagnosed with ovarian cancer when she was in college. Today she and her kids get their health care through the Affordable Care Act. But child advocates say a repeal of that law could jeopardize the program that covers her children. Will Stone/KJZZ hide caption

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Will Stone/KJZZ

Arizona Children Could Lose Health Coverage Under Obamacare Repeal

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Ohio Gov. John Kasich, shown at a White House event in November, met with GOP members of the Senate Finance Committee last week for a closed-door discussion about the health care law. Cheriss May/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Cheriss May/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Meet The Republican Governors Who Don't Want To Repeal All Of Obamacare

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In New York, A Trump Supporter Eagerly Awaits Inauguration Day

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Gas prices seen at an Oklahoma City 7-Eleven in December. Amid a state budget slump, Oklahoma lawmakers are considering raising gas taxes for the first time in 30 years. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Gas Taxes May Go Up Around The Country As States Seek To Plug Budget Holes

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Matt and Abra Schultz, of Pottsville, Pa., say they're frustrated by the rising cost of health insurance. Ben Allen/WITF hide caption

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Ben Allen/WITF

Insurance Customers In Pennsylvania Look To Trump To Ease Their Burden

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Sara Kelly Jones of Charlotte, N.C., says she is terrified she will lose her health insurance if lawmakers repeal the Affordable Care Act. Hannah Sharpe/Legal Services of Southern Piedmont hide caption

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Hannah Sharpe/Legal Services of Southern Piedmont

As Obamacare Repeal Heats Up, Newly Insured North Carolinians Fret

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Former Georgia Rep. Mike Dudgeon casts the ceremonial first vote of the new session of the Georgia House of Representatives on Jan. 10, 2011, in Atlanta. Dudgeon retired from the Legislature in 2016 because of work-life balance issues. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Low Pay In State Legislatures Means Some Can't Afford The Job

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Ruth McCafferty, who works in Kalispell, Mont., credits the training she got through the state's Medicaid expansion with helping her get a good job. Eric Whitney / MTPR hide caption

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Eric Whitney / MTPR

Montana May Be Model For Future Medicaid Work Requirement

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