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Facebook and Twitter appear to be key platforms in Russia's interference in the 2016 election; investigators want to know more. Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images

New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner (from right), Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach and former Ohio Secretary of State Ken Blackwell at the second meeting of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, on Tuesday. Holly Ramer/AP hide caption

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Holly Ramer/AP

Tension And Protests Mark Trump Voting Commission Meeting

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Glenn Simpson, a former reporter who later helped found a private investigation firm, sat down with Senate Judiciary Committee staff behind closed doors on Tuesday, congressional aides told NPR. Liam James Doyle/NPR hide caption

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President Trump walks out of the White House toward Marine One on the South Lawn on Monday. A new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds most Americans think Trump's response to Charlottesville events was "not strong enough." Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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President Trump speaks while flanked by Kansas Secretary of State, Kris Kobach (left) and Vice President Pence during the first meeting of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Donald Trump Jr. and Ivanka Trump arrive for President Trump's inauguration on Jan. 20. Trump Jr. is under scrutiny over revelations about a meeting he held with a Russian lawyer in 2016. Saul Loeb/Getty Images hide caption

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People vote on on November 8, 2016 in Los Angeles. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Making U.S. Elections More Secure Wouldn't Cost Much But No One Wants To Pay

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Republican candidate Karen Handel greets people during a campaign stop as she runs for Georgia's 6th Congressional District on June 19, 2017 in Alpharetta, Georgia. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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A database with the information of nearly 200 million people was discovered by a cyber-risk analyst. The voter information had been compiled by a marketing firm contracted by Republican groups. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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A ballot scanner in New York City ahead of last November's election. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

If Voting Machines Were Hacked, Would Anyone Know?

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Rep. Mike Quigley has introduced the Covfefe Act, which would expand the Presidential Records Act to include social media. Above, the Illinois Democrat on Capitol Hill on Monday. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Protesters march during a May Day demonstration outside of a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) office on May 1, 2017 in San Francisco, California. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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President Trump walks on the South Lawn after returning to the White House earlier this month. A government shutdown is just three days away, and Trump is digging in on demands. Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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A view of a ballot scanner at a New York City Board of Elections voting machine facility warehouse just before last November's election. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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State And Local Officials Wary Of Federal Government's Election Security Efforts

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Ben Carson arrives for the presidential inaugural parade in front of the White House on Jan. 20. Carson was confirmed as Housing and Urban Development secretary on Thursday. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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