Photography Photography

Vox photo editor Kainaz Amaria thinks it's time the photojournalism world reckons with what she sees as an industrywide culture of sexual harassment with roots in a glaring gender imbalance. Nick Oza/Courtesy of Kainaz Amaria hide caption

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Nick Oza/Courtesy of Kainaz Amaria

Photojournalists Are Demanding A #MeToo Reckoning

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Photographer Bill Cunningham outside Skylight Clarkson Sq during New York Fashion Week on July 15, 2015 in New York City. Noam Galai/Getty Images hide caption

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Noam Galai/Getty Images

Bill Cunningham: A Memoir Of Style On All Levels, High And Low

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Shahidul Alam, surrounded by police, arrives at a Dhaka court on Aug. 6. Nobel laureates and human rights groups have called for his release. Ahmed Salahuddin/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmed Salahuddin/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Ayanna Pressley begins her day at Jubilee Christian Church on Blue Hill Avenue in Mattapan, where a couple of hundred seniors have gathered ahead of the annual District B-3 Community Harbor Cruise, sponsored by the Boston Police Department. Meredith Nierman/WGBH hide caption

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Meredith Nierman/WGBH

Tima Kurdi holds her necklace bearing a photograph of her nephews, Alan (left) and Ghalib Kurdi. She is the author of The Boy on the Beach: My Family's Escape from Syria and Our Hope for a New Home. Ben Stansall /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Stansall /AFP/Getty Images

A group of older boys, some of whom are gang members, joke around with a younger boy. Neighborhood children are often groomed for gang activity from the age of 6 or 7. At first they may be given small assignments — like buying snacks for gang members or monitoring who's coming in and out of a neighborhood, says Ayuso. Bit by bit, he says, they graduate into bigger responsibilities. Tomas Ayuso hide caption

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Tomas Ayuso

Davi Tatiana Chirino-Santos, 9, and her baby brother, Arnold Jafer Lopez-Santos, crossed with their mother, Jessica Carolina Santos Lopez. Though the journey was long, Chirino-Santos is looking forward to creating a better life in the U.S. She wants to study to be a doctor. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

PHOTOS: What It's Like On Both Sides Of The U.S.-Mexico Border's Busiest Crossing

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Abdul-Azeez Buba, 33, Borno, Nigeria: "Before Boko Haram attacked my community, I was a successful building engineer. I made a lot of money from constructing houses." Etinosa Yvonne Osayimwen/Courtesy of www.etinosayvonne.me hide caption

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Etinosa Yvonne Osayimwen/Courtesy of www.etinosayvonne.me