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Ted Ligety finished 15th in the men's giant slalom on Sunday. He told reporters this Olympics will likely be his last. Dimitar Dilkoff/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dimitar Dilkoff/AFP/Getty Images

Snow-making has been called a Band-Aid to the bigger problem of warming temperatures. Patrik Duda / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Patrik Duda / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

Snow-Making For Skiing During Warm Winters Comes With Environmental Cost

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National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster spoke at the Munich Security Conference Saturday and said the U.S. "will expose and act against those who use cyberspace" to spread disinformation. Sebastian Widmann/Getty Images hide caption

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Sebastian Widmann/Getty Images

Students sit in an open area after their school was evacuated in Veracruz, Mexico, on Friday, after a magnitude 7.2 earthquake. Later Friday, 13 people died after a helicopter surveying the damage near the epicenter crashed. Felix Marquez/AP hide caption

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Felix Marquez/AP

In this July 10, 2014, photo, Bobby Bostic is photographed in the visitation room at Crossroads Correctional Center in Cameron, Mo. A former St. Louis judge who sentenced Bostic, then a teenager, to 241 years in prison, says she regrets her ruling and is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to give him the opportunity for reform. Robert Cohen/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP hide caption

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Robert Cohen/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP

She Sentenced A Teen To 241 Years In Prison. Now She Wants Her Decision Overturned

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Smallpox virus, colorized and magnified in this micrograph 42,000 times, is the real concern for biologists working on a cousin virus — horsepox. They're hoping to develop a better vaccine against smallpox, should that human scourge ever be used as a bioweapon. Chris Bjornberg/Science Source hide caption

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Chris Bjornberg/Science Source

Did Pox Virus Research Put Potential Profits Ahead of Public Safety?

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During the 2017 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival last April, Mr. Okra drove his iconic produce truck and called out to customers. Erika Goldring/Getty Images hide caption

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Erika Goldring/Getty Images

Listen to Mr. Okra’s Call

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A Facebook posting, released by the House intelligence committee, for a group called "Woke Blacks" is photographed in Washington, D.C., Friday, Feb. 16, 2018. Jon Elswick/AP hide caption

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Jon Elswick/AP

Revelers celebrate during the Carnival street parade of the Bloco das Carmelitas in the Santa Teresa neighborhood in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, last week. Mauro Pimentel/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mauro Pimentel/AFP/Getty Images

Rio Carnival: When Brazil Lets Out Its Mysterious 'Inner Chicken'

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In this file photo taken on April 19, 2015, a women enters the four-story building known as the "troll factory" in St. Petersburg, Russia. The U.S. government alleges the Internet Research Agency started interfering as early as 2014 in U.S. politics, extending to the 2016 presidential election. Dmitry Lovetsky/AP hide caption

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Dmitry Lovetsky/AP