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U.S. global AIDS coordinator Debbie Birx was named as Vice President Pence's point person on the coronavirus response on Thursday. Riccardo Savi/Getty Images hide caption

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Riccardo Savi/Getty Images

Lee Boyd Malvo, the 'D.C. Sniper.' The U.S. Supreme Court agreed to dismiss a pending case after the state changed a criminal sentencing law for juveniles. Virginia Department of Corrections /AP hide caption

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Virginia Department of Corrections /AP

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, headquartered in Atlanta, announced on Wednesday a new case of the COVID-19 disease in California, a diagnosis that was delayed because testing wasn't done immediately. Jessica McGowan/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Former Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh and her attorney arrive for a sentencing hearing in Baltimore on Thursday. Pugh pleaded guilty to federal fraud, tax and conspiracy charges last year. Steve Ruark/AP hide caption

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Steve Ruark/AP

"I'm trying to let go of the worrying thing, and that's what I've loved the most about this album, rather than the first one," Harry Styles says of making his album Fine Line. Helene Marie Pambrun/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Helene Marie Pambrun/Courtesy of the artist

Harry Styles On 'Fine Line,' Stevie Nicks And His Definition Of Success

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People watch from Jekyll Island as emergency responders work to rescue crew members from a 656-ft. capsized cargo ship on Sept. 9, 2019 in St. Simons Island Sound, Brunswick, Ga. Sean Rayford/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Rayford/Getty Images

Overturned Cargo Ship Soon To Be Sliced Up And Removed From Georgia Sound

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An airplane arrives at London's Heathrow Airport on Thursday — the same day a court blocked plans for a third runway at the airport, citing the government's climate change commitments. Chris J. Ratcliffe/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris J. Ratcliffe/Getty Images

A protester holds a sign reading "The Oceans Are Rising But So Are We" at an Amazon employee walkout in Seattle, as part of the Global Climate Strike on Sept. 20, 2019. At some companies, employees are putting increasing pressure on their bosses to act on climate change. Chloe Collyer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Chloe Collyer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Better Late Than Never? Big Companies Scramble To Make Lofty Climate Promises

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As Super Tuesday approaches, Denver resident KSue Anderson can't stop thinking about climate change. Between 2014 and 2019, the number of Americans alarmed about climate change nearly tripled according to the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication. Hart Van Denburg/CPR News hide caption

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Hart Van Denburg/CPR News

Scottish Parliament member Monica Lennon (right) joins supporters of the Period Products bill she sponsored, at a rally outside Parliament in Edinburgh on Tuesday. The legislation would make Scotland the first country in the world to make products like pads and tampons freely available. Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty Images

Most efforts to develop a universal flu vaccine have focused on the lollipop-shaped hemagglutinin protein (pink in this illustration of a flu virus). Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Traders work during the opening bell at the New York Stock Exchange on Thursday. Wall Street stocks opened sharply lower amid fears the coronavirus will grow into a significant international health crisis. Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

A view of Phnom Penh, the capital of Cambodia, from the riverfront of a temple complex outside the city. Michael Sullivan for NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan for NPR

'Houses On The River Will Fall': Cambodia's Sand Mining Threatens Vital Mekong

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Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar testifies before a House Commerce subcommittee on Capitol Hill in Washington, on Wednesday. Azar has been leading the White House coronavirus task force. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Milwaukee (left), Pueblo, Colo., and Charlotte, N.C. are three of the locations NPR's Where Voters Are project will highlight throughout the year. Eric Baradat/AFP, Kevin J. Beaty for NPR and Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP, Kevin J. Beaty for NPR and Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images