Music Features In-depth storytelling from the NPR Music team.

Music Features

Antonin Dvorak predicted that American classical music would draw from African American traditions. A new article wonders why American classical music has remained so white. Karen Chan /Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

toggle caption
Karen Chan /Getty Images/EyeEm

Angelique Kidjo's Celia celebrates the music of Celia Cruz. Laurent Seroussi/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Laurent Seroussi/Courtesy of the artist

Angélique Kidjo Celebrates Celia Cruz: 'Everything About Celia Is Self-Determination'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/762395800/762485886" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"It's not a bad thing to be old fashioned, but, you know, not everything old fashioned was great either. This kind of meets in the middle," Jon Pardi says of his new album. Jim Wright/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Jim Wright/Courtesy of the artist

Ric Ocasek, photographed in New York in June, 1995 — the same year a young Matthew Caws handed him a demo recording of his band, Nada Surf. Shortly thereafter, Ocasek was producing the group's debut album, High/Low. Bob Berg/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bob Berg/Getty Images

Celia Cruz performs in New York in 1995. That same year, Deborah Paredez saw her at Chicago's Aragon Ballroom. "Cruz opened her mouth, the band lifted their horns and we came together on the dancefloor," she says. Jack Vartoogian/Getty Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jack Vartoogian/Getty Images/Getty Images

Steve Perry performs with Journey at a Chicago-area concert in 1981. Paul Natkin/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Natkin/Getty Images

'Don't Stop Believin" Goes On And On, Because We Need It To

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/760315306/761126913" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Andy Kirk And His Orchestra, including Mary Lou Williams (sitting at the piano), pose for a studio group portrait in 1940. Williams toured with Kirk's band before settling in New York. Gilles Petard/Redferns hide caption

toggle caption
Gilles Petard/Redferns

Mary Lou Williams in 1942. In the 1930s and '40s, her apartment on 63 Hamilton Terrace formed an important space in advancing the evolution of jazz and the survival of musicians. Donaldson Collection/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Donaldson Collection/Getty Images