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The Department of Justice has narrowed the scope of a warrant it served to web hosting company DreamHost. The government has demanded information about DisruptJ20.org, a website used to organize protests in Washington, D.C., during the Inauguration in January. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Lawmakers Want To Make California A Sanctuary State

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Veterans: How Will Trump's Ban Affect Transgender Troops?

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Ahmed Abu Khatallah is sworn in during a hearing at the federal U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., in June 2014. He has pleaded not guilty to murder and terrorism charges related to the 2012 attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya. Dana Verkouteren/AP hide caption

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Dana Verkouteren/AP

Trial Looms For Sole Defendant In 2012 Benghazi Attack That Killed Ambassador

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Oregon Gov. Kate Brown, D, center, recently signed a bill into law that would require insurers in the state to cover reproductive health services. Don Ryan/AP hide caption

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Don Ryan/AP

White nationalist Richard Spencer's free speech fight against Google, Facebook and other tech companies has some unlikely support from the left. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Unlikely Allies Join Fight To Protect Free Speech On The Internet

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Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks at the Department of Justice on Aug. 4. The department is being sued by multiple cities, including now Los Angeles, over its stance on "sanctuary cities." Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Greenpeace activists hang a banner from the rafters at a bank shareholders' meeting earlier this year in Zurich, calling for it to "STOP DIRTY PIPELINE DEALS!" Also on the banner are hashtags supporting Dakota Access Pipeline protesters. Michael Buholzer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Buholzer/AFP/Getty Images

A California jury awarded a woman $417 million in a case against Johnson & Johnson. The woman claimed that her use of Johnson's Baby Powder led to terminal ovarian cancer. Scientists disagree on how strong a link there is between talc and ovarian cancer. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Does Baby Powder Cause Cancer? A Jury Says Yes. Scientists Aren't So Sure

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Ted Kaczynski is flanked by federal agents as he is led from the federal courthouse in Helena, Mont., on April 4, 1996. Kaczynski is now serving a life sentence in prison for the bombings. John Youngbear/Associated Press hide caption

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John Youngbear/Associated Press

FBI Profiler Says Linguistic Work Was Pivotal In Capture Of Unabomber

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A prosecutor said Monday that Nathaniel Richmond was the man who shot and wounded Jefferson County, Ohio, Judge Joseph Bruzzese. After Richmond's son and a co-defendant were convicted of rape in 2013, Richmond, above, apologized to the victim and her family. Keith Srakocic/AP hide caption

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Keith Srakocic/AP

New nursing home residents are frequently handed an agreement to go to arbitration instead of suing if something goes wrong. Nam Y. Huh/AP hide caption

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Nam Y. Huh/AP

Under Trump Rule, Nursing Home Residents May Not Be Able To Sue After Abuse

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The Role The Judiciary Played In The Rally In Charlottesville, Va.

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A protester wears a pistol in Charlottesville, Va., on Saturday. The ACLU says it will consider the potential for violence when evaluating whether to represent potential clients. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Edward French, 71, was killed in San Francisco on July 11. One of the murder suspects was arrested two weeks before his death for gun possession and parole violations. The suspect was released based on a "public-safety assessment score" — a computer generated score that helps calculate whether a suspect is a flight risk or likely to return to court. Courtesy of Brian Higginbotham hide caption

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Courtesy of Brian Higginbotham

Did A Bail Reform Algorithm Contribute To This San Francisco Man's Murder?

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Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson, pictured here during an interview last month, ended the state's Medicaid contract with Planned Parenthood two years ago. He praised the circuit court's decision. Stephan Savoia/AP hide caption

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Stephan Savoia/AP