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Latin America

Maria Rivas and her 15-year-old daughter, Emily, embrace after their StoryCorps interview last month. Mia Warren/StoryCorps hide caption

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Mia Warren/StoryCorps

A Mom And Her Teenage Daughter Brace For A Future Apart

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Relatives and friends of Eduardo Felipe Santos Victor, a teenager who was shot dead in Morro da Providencia, a low-income favela community, mourn during his funeral in Rio de Janeiro, on Sept. 30, 2015. Silvia Izquierdo/AP hide caption

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Silvia Izquierdo/AP

Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro takes the oath of office in Caracas, Venezuela, on Thursday. Maduro starts his second term amid international denunciation of his victory and a devastating economic crisis. Ariana Cubillos/AP hide caption

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Ariana Cubillos/AP

People walk in front of Venezuela's Supreme Court of Justice, in Caracas. Venezuelan Justice Christian Zerpa left the country for the U.S., denouncing the re-election of President Nicolás Maduro. Marco Bello/Reuters hide caption

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Marco Bello/Reuters

Alejandro Aparicio Santiago appears in a photograph issued by the Oaxaca state government. The newly elected mayor of the town of Tlaxiaco was killed within hours of taking office. Facebook.com/AlejandroAparicioMorena hide caption

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Facebook.com/AlejandroAparicioMorena

Migrants run as tear gas is thrown by U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents to the Mexican side of the border fence after they climbed the fence to get to San Diego from Tijuana, Mexico. Daniel Ochoa de Olza/AP hide caption

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Daniel Ochoa de Olza/AP

U.S. Agents Fire Tear Gas At Migrants Trying To Cross Mexico Border

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Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro and his wife Michelle Bolsonaro head to the National Congress for his swearing-in ceremony, in Brasilia on Jan. 1. Carl De Souza/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Carl De Souza/AFP/Getty Images

On New Year's Day, Jair Bolsonaro will be sworn in as president of Brazil. He's an admirer of Donald Trump, and his rise to power has created — and reflected — deep divisions among Brazilians. Buda Mendes/Getty Images hide caption

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Buda Mendes/Getty Images

Jair Bolsonaro, A Polarizing Figure, Prepares To Become Brazil's President

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The demand that an Argentine radio show host start hosting programming about gender issues comes against a backdrop of debate about sexism and women's rights in Argentina. In this photo taken in June, pro- and anti-abortion demonstrators are seen outside the Congress building in Buenos Aires. Eitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images

Sorrel, a festive drink made by steeping hibiscus flowers, is the taste of the holidays throughout the Caribbean. It is also a close cousin to the African-American red drink, described as "liquid soul." Andrea Y. Henderson/NPR hide caption

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Andrea Y. Henderson/NPR

From left: Man Kaur of India celebrates after competing in the 100-meter sprint in the 100+ age category at the World Masters Games in Auckland, New Zealand; an illustration inspired by a list of global poverty thinkers being called a "Sausagefest"; Maryangel Garcia Ramos, 32, a disability activist from Mexico. From left: Michael Bradley/AFP/Getty Images; Hanna Barczyk for NPR; and Antonio Escobar hide caption

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From left: Michael Bradley/AFP/Getty Images; Hanna Barczyk for NPR; and Antonio Escobar

Central American migrants, hoping to ask for asylum in the United States, are being relocated to a temporary shelter in Tijuana, Mexico. Volunteers from San Diego visit the migrants weekly to help with health care. GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/Getty Images

For Asylum-Seekers Waiting In Mexico, Volunteers Offer Medical Help

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The Los Angeles Dodgers' Yasiel Puig defected from Cuba to play baseball in the U.S. On Wednesday, Major League Baseball and Cuba's baseball federation reached an agreement allowing Cuban players to sign with U.S. teams without having to defect first. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

The Cuban government announced plans to remove wording that would open the island to same-sex marriage from the latest draft of its new constitution. In October, Cubans who protested the controversial amendment hung posters saying, "I'm in favor of the original design," in Havana. Desmond Boylan/AP hide caption

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Desmond Boylan/AP

José Palacios, a cacao farmer, holds the Late Chocó chocolate products produced by his son, Joel, in Bogotá. The package bears an illustration of his likeness. José Palacios lives in Colombia's western Chocó department, which is also a coca-growing region. Verónica Zaragovia for NPR hide caption

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Verónica Zaragovia for NPR