Health Health

Sleep Scientist Warns Against Walking Through Life 'In An Underslept State'

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A pharmacy technician prepares syringes containing an injectable anesthetic in the sterile medicines area of the inpatient pharmacy at the University of Utah Hospital in Salt Lake City. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

Doctors Raise Alarm About Shortages Of Pain Medications

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A sign marks the entrance to a VA Hospital in Hines, Ill. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

VA Whistleblowers 10 Times More Likely Than Peers To Receive Disciplinary Action

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In central Appalachia, the black lung rate for working coal miners with at least 25 years experience underground is the highest it's been in a quarter century. Don Klumpp/Getty Images hide caption

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Don Klumpp/Getty Images

Pesto and pulled jackfruit tacos. In Southern California, working-class Mexican-American chefs are giving traditionally meaty dishes a vegan spin. Evi Oravecz/Green Evi/Picture Press/Getty Images hide caption

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Evi Oravecz/Green Evi/Picture Press/Getty Images

Proponents of hospital mergers say the change can help struggling nonprofit hospitals "thrive," with an infusion of cash to invest in updated technology and top clinical staff. But research shows the price of care, especially for low-income patients, usually rises when a hospital joins a for-profit corporation. Jens Magnusson/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Jens Magnusson/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Louisiana's New Approach To Treating Hepatitis C

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How Drug Companies Control How Their Drugs Are Covered By Medicaid

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Each Re-New home is furnished to meet the needs and tastes of families. Jay Shah/WPLN hide caption

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Jay Shah/WPLN

Furnishing Homes For A New Life After Domestic Violence

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Paul Blow for NPR

Investigation: Patients' Drug Options Under Medicaid Heavily Influenced By Drugmakers

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UCLA researchers are using a radioactive tracer, which binds to abnormal proteins in the brain, to see if it is possible to diagnose chronic traumatic encephalopathy in living patients. Warmer colors in these PET scans indicate higher concentrations of the tracer. UCLA hide caption

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UCLA
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More Screen Time For Teens Linked To ADHD Symptoms

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Some critically ill patients who received a CAR-T cell treatment have remained cancer-free for as long as five years, researchers say. But the price is high. Fanatic Studio/Collection Mix: Subjects RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Fanatic Studio/Collection Mix: Subjects RF/Getty Images
Justin Volz for ProPublica

Health Insurers Are Vacuuming Up Details About You — And It Could Raise Your Rates

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A newborn girl is the first baby born in the New Year at Nanjing Maternity and Child Health Hospital on January 1, 2018 in Nanjing, Jiangsu Province of China. VCG/VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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VCG/VCG via Getty Images

When the heart pushes too hard, as it does when blood pressure is elevated, it can cause damage that can lead to a stroke, says Dr. Walter Koroshetz. John Rensten/Getty Images hide caption

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John Rensten/Getty Images

Worried About Dementia? You Might Want to Check Your Blood Pressure

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