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Liege Camila Pistore Veras, Rafael Duckur, and Joana Luiza Mendes (left to right) load boxes of produce into a truck at a farm outside of Sao Paulo, Brazil. This produce, and more, will be distributed in favelas, poor urban neighborhoods where residents live in crowded homes and lack basic sanitation. Patrícia Monteiro for NPR hide caption

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Patrícia Monteiro for NPR

North Carolina's Department of Health and Human Services announced Saturday that it had recorded 1,107 new coronavirus infections, the state's highest one-day spike since the outbreak began. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP

People relax in the sun while practicing social distancing last weekend in New York City's Domino Park. On Friday night, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo issued an order loosening some of the state's coronavirus restrictions. Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

Town worker Steve Crowley washes and disinfects the public restroom at Mayflower Beach, in Dennis, Mass., last week. As stay-at-home restrictions are lifting, many people are concerned about using public restrooms. John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Fear Of Public Restrooms Prompts Creative Solutions As Some Businesses Reopen

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Dana Nessel announcing her bid for Michigan attorney general in 2017. Detroit Free Press/Tribune News Service via Getty I hide caption

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Detroit Free Press/Tribune News Service via Getty I

Michigan AG Says She 'Will Not Remain Silent' As Trump Risks Public Health

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People wait in line to get food distributed by the National Guard in Chelsea, Mass., on April 16. Harvard researchers found areas with more poverty, people of color and crowded housing had higher mortality rates for the coronavirus. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

Harvard Researchers Find 'Inequality On Top Of Inequality' In COVID-19 Deaths

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This Bornean horseshoe bat and other bat species can harbor coronaviruses. The nonprofit group EcoHealth Alliance had U.S. government funding for an ongoing research project in China on bats and coronaviruses — until the money was cut on April 24. NHPA/NHPA/Science Source hide caption

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NHPA/NHPA/Science Source

Feda Almaliti with her son, 15-year-old Muhammed, who has severe autism. "Muhammed is an energetic, loving boy who doesn't understand what's going on right now," she says. Feda Almaliti hide caption

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Feda Almaliti

'He's Incredibly Confused': Parenting A Child With Autism During The Pandemic

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A worker wipes down surfaces on a New York City subway car to disinfect seats during the coronavirus outbreak. The CDC is clarifying its guidance on touching surfaces after a change to its website triggered news reports. Andrew Kelly/Reuters hide caption

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Andrew Kelly/Reuters

South Korean soldiers wearing protective masks sit at a temperature screening point at Incheon International Airport, South Korea, on March 9. SeongJoon Cho/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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SeongJoon Cho/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Dr. Jonas Salk, the scientist who created the polio vaccine, administers an injection to an unidentified boy at Arsenal Elementary School in Pittsburgh, Pa., in 1954. AP hide caption

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AP

The Race For A Polio Vaccine Differed From The Quest To Prevent Coronavirus

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