Health Health

Under rules outlined in a newly unveiled Trump administration proposal, crisis pregnancy centers and other organizations that do not provide standard contraceptive options, like birth control pills or IUDs, could find it easier to apply for Title X funds. Peter Dazeley/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Dazeley/Getty Images

Under Trump, Family Planning Funds Could Go To Groups That Oppose Contraception

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The health insurance company Anthem has introduced a policy discouraging patients from "avoidable" emergency room visits. Patients and doctors are pushing back against the program. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Cyclist by Lake Michigan shore, Gold Coast district, Chicago. Biking to work is associated with higher levels of well-being. Amanda Hall / robertharding/Getty Images/Robert Harding World Imagery hide caption

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Amanda Hall / robertharding/Getty Images/Robert Harding World Imagery

The kids also learned handy visuals, like a remote control for negative thoughts so you can switch channels in your head. Nathalie Dieterle/for NPR hide caption

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Nathalie Dieterle/for NPR

For Troubled Kids, Some Schools Take Time Out For Group Therapy

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An employee of the U.S. government in Guangzhou, China, has reported mysterious symptoms similar to those experienced by State Department employees in Cuba. Here, the U.S. Consulate in Guangzhou. U.S. Department of State hide caption

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U.S. Department of State

Patients in the study had "significantly lower out-of-pocket costs — on the average, $500 — when they visited a physical therapist first," says Bianca Frogner, a health economist at the University of Washington. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

Trying Physical Therapy First For Low Back Pain May Curb Use Of Opioids

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California is starting to push hospitals throughout the state to lower their rates of medically unnecessary C-sections. Thanasis Zovoilis/Getty Images hide caption

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Thanasis Zovoilis/Getty Images

The Food and Drug Administration approves more than 99 percent of applications for compassionate use of experimental medicines. But supporters of a right-to-try law want a more direct approach. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

The rate of the advanced stage of the deadly disease black lung is growing in central Appalachia, according to a new study. Tyler Stableford/Getty Images hide caption

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Tyler Stableford/Getty Images

New Studies Confirm A Surge In Coal Miners' Disease

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New Book Explores The Science Of Pregnancy 'Like A Mother'

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A demonstration in Copenhagen, Denmark, in support of Syrian migrants. A new study looks at the benefit of offering physical and psychological support to refugees who have been tortured. Frédéric Soltan/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Frédéric Soltan/Corbis via Getty Images

Indians standing in a line outside a hospital wear masks as a precautionary measure against the Nipah virus at the Government Medical College hospital in Kozhikode, in the southern Indian state of Kerala, on Monday. AP hide caption

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AP

DNA isolated from a small sample of saliva or blood can yield information, fairly inexpensively, about a person's relative risk of developing dozens of diseases or medical conditions. GIPhotoStock/Cultura RF/Getty Images hide caption

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GIPhotoStock/Cultura RF/Getty Images

A man shops for vegetables beside romaine lettuce for sale at a supermarket in Los Angeles. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Hey, Salad Lovers: It's OK To Eat Romaine Lettuce Again

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Scientific Studies Confirm A Spike In Black Lung Disease

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Undocumented immigrants often can't get routine dialysis care and have to wait until their condition worsens to get emergency care. Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media

Luci Baines Johnson Receives Honorary Nursing Degree From Georgetown University

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