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Health Care

A 5ml dose of liquid oxycodone, an opioid pain relief medication, sits on a table in Washington, D.C., March 29, 2019. During the opioid epidemic, roughly 218,000 Americans have died from overdoses tied to prescription pain pills, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. EVA HAMBACH/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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EVA HAMBACH/AFP/Getty Images

Democrats Try To Distinguish Themselves On Health Care

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When the cancer clinic at Mercy Hospital Fort Scott closed in January, Karen Endicott-Coyan and other cancer patients had to continue their treatments out of town. Christopher Smith for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Christopher Smith for Kaiser Health News

Have Cancer, Must Travel: Patients Left In Lurch After Town's Hospital Closes

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An employee at a Methodist University Hospital is being sued by her employer for unpaid medical bills incurred before they hired her. Andrea Morales for MLK50 hide caption

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Andrea Morales for MLK50

A Tennessee Hospital Sues Its Own Employees When They Can't Pay Their Medical Bills

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During one of his visits to the needle exchange van in Miami, Arrow was referred to inpatient drug treatment. Here, he displays keyrings marking milestones of his sobriety. Sammy Mack/WLRN hide caption

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Sammy Mack/WLRN

Key Florida Republicans Now Say Yes To Clean Needles For Drug Users

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Democrats Debate Health Care And Other Issues At Miami Forum

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Marchers at a candlelight vigil in San Francisco, Calif., carry a banner to call attention to the continuing battle against AIDS on May 29, 1989. The city was home to the nation's first AIDS special care unit. The unit, which opened in 1983, is the subject the documentary 5B. Jason M. Grow/AP hide caption

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Jason M. Grow/AP

1st AIDS Ward '5B' Fought To Give Patients Compassionate Care, Dignified Deaths

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Daisha Smith says she only realized she had been sued over her hospital bill when she saw her paycheck was being garnished. "I literally have no food in my house because they're garnishing my check," she says. Olivia Falcigno/NPR hide caption

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Olivia Falcigno/NPR

When Hospitals Sue For Unpaid Bills, It Can Be 'Ruinous' For Patients

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Trump Directs Alex Azar To Help Make Health Care Costs More Transparent

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An executive order President Trump signed Monday aims to make most hospital pricing more transparent to patients, long before they get the bill. Sam Edwards/Caiaimage/Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Edwards/Caiaimage/Getty Images

The executive order on drug price transparency that President Trump signed Monday doesn't spell out specific actions; rather, it directs the department of Health and Human Services to develop a policy and then undertake a lengthy rule-making process. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Trump Administration Pushes To Make Health Care Pricing More Transparent

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Trump To Sign Executive Order Aimed At Health Care Costs

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During a training session, Dr. Kenneth Kim and a surgical resident practice a hysterectomy on a robotic simulator at UAB Hospital. Mary Scott Hodgin/WBHM 90.3 hide caption

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Doctors Learn The Nuts And Bolts Of Robotic Surgery

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Training Better Robotic Surgeons

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Missouri Refuses To Renew The License Of Its Only Abortion Clinic

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