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Questions For An Emergency Medicine Doctor And An Epidemiologist About COVID-19

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Dr. Deborah Birx, White House coronavirus response coordinator, discussed one of the models used to estimate potential deaths from coronavirus in U.S. during a briefing Tuesday. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Seema Verma, administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), speaks during a news conference in Washington, D.C., Tuesday, March 10th, 2020. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Medicare And Medicaid Administrator Addresses U.S. Health Care Response To COVID-19

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Rohingya refugees wait at a relief distribution point in the Kutupalong refugee camp in Bangladesh on March 24. Suzauddin Rubel/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Suzauddin Rubel/AFP via Getty Images

More than 20 cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed at the Soldiers' Home in Holyoke, including at least five deaths. The nursing facility is about 90 miles west of Boston. Google Maps/ Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Google Maps/ Screenshot by NPR

Aetna was the first insurer to announce its plan to help shield patients with COVID-19 from high medical bills. But out-of-network charges and other surprise bills remain a risk, say advocates for patients. Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images

With the coronavirus outbreak taking hold in the U.S., thousands of flights have been canceled — but on Sunday, there were still 2,800 planes in the air, according to aviation site Flightradar.com Courtesy of Flightradar24.com hide caption

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Courtesy of Flightradar24.com

COVID-19 Has Brought Rapid Change To A Brooklyn Hospital

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As hospitals consider how the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting care, maternity wards across the country are changing policies on deliveries and visitors. Jasper Jacobs/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jasper Jacobs/AFP via Getty Images

Pregnant Women Worry About Pandemic's Impact On Labor, Delivery And Babies

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The U.S. Navy hospital ship Comfort is welcomed to New York City by Charlene Nickloan, waving a flag from the Matthew Buono war memorial in Staten Island, N.Y., on Monday. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Bebeto Matthews/AP

Army Chief Of Staff Tours N.Y. Military Hospital

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A staffer checks on a ventilator in an intensive care unit in Chennai, India, Friday. States in the U.S. are coming up with plans for what to do if they run out of ventilators and other supplies. Arun Sankar/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Arun Sankar/AFP via Getty Images

HHS Warns States Not To Put People With Disabilities At The Back Of The Line For Care

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A photograph from 1940, taken for infectious research purposes at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, shows respiratory droplets released through sneezing. Bettmann/Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann/Bettmann Archive

After an initial verbal screening, one driver at a time gets a COVID-19 nasal swab test from a garbed health worker at a drive-up station in Daly City, Calif. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images