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Health Care

Hokyoung Kim for NPR and KHN

When Teens Abuse Parents, Shame and Secrecy Make It Hard to Seek Help

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Years ago, Portia Smith (center) was afraid to seek care for her postpartum depression because she feared child welfare involvement. She and her daughters Shanell Smith (right), 19, and Najai Jones Smith (left), 15, pose for a selfie in February after makeup artist Najai made up everyone as they were getting ready at home to go to a movie together. Tom Gralish/Philadelphia Inquirer hide caption

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Tom Gralish/Philadelphia Inquirer

Black Mothers Get Less Treatment For Their Postpartum Depression

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Future Of Surprise Medical Billing Legislation Remains Uncertain

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If you don't have a steady source of healthy food, it's hard to manage chronic conditions. That's why health care providers are setting up food pantries — right in hospitals and clinics. mixetto/Getty Images hide caption

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'Food Pharmacies' In Clinics: When The Diagnosis Is Chronic Hunger

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Bill Of The Month: Extraction Of Doll Shoes In Girl's Nose Cost $2,659

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Lucy Branson, now 4, holds Polly Pocket shoes like the ones she put in her nose. Heidi de Marco/KHN hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/KHN

Nothing To Sneeze At: $2,659 Bill To Pluck Doll's Shoe From Girl's Nose

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Matthew Braun, a first-year medical student at Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences in Yakima, Wash., says his personal history with opioids will help him care for patients. Jovelle Tamayo for NPR hide caption

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Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

Medical Students Say Their Opioid Experiences Will Shape How They Prescribe

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Department Of Veterans Affairs Thinks Telehealth Clinics May Help Vets In Rural Areas

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Keith Meehan is one of an estimated 1 million Americans who get health care coverage through a health care sharing ministry. After Meehan's back surgery, Aliera and Trinity HealthShare declined to pay approximately $200,000 in medical bills, saying back pain was a preexisting condition. Todd Bookman/NHPR hide caption

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Todd Bookman/NHPR

Regulators Allege Christian-Based Health Care Provider Broke State, Federal Rules

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Geriatric oncologist Supriya Gupta Mohile meets with patient Jim Mulcahy at Highland Hospital in Rochester, N.Y. "If I didn't do a geriatric assessment and just looked at a patient I wouldn't have the same information," she says. Mike Bradley for NPR hide caption

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Mike Bradley for NPR

An infant is monitored for opioid withdrawal in a neonatal intensive care unit at the CAMC Women and Children's Hospital in Charleston, W.Va., in June. Infants exposed to opioids in utero often experience symptoms of withdrawal. Salwan Georges/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Salwan Georges/The Washington Post/Getty Images

In The Fight For Money For The Opioid Crisis, Will The Youngest Victims Be Left Out?

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Licensed practical nurse Stephanie Dotson measures Kent Beasley's blood pressure in downtown Atlanta in September. Dotson is a member of the Mercy Care team that works to bring medical care to Atlanta residents who are homeless. Bita Honarvar for WABE hide caption

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Bita Honarvar for WABE

They Bring Medical Care To The Homeless And Build Relationships To Save Lives

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Enrollment help was plentiful for insurance sign-ups in the early years of the Affordable Care Act, such as at this clinic in Bear, Del., in 2014. Though the Trump administration has since slashed the outreach budget, about 930,000 people have signed up for ACA health plans so far this year. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Sandra King Young runs Medicaid in American Samoa, a U.S. territory that faces dramatic funding cuts to islanders' health care unless Congress acts. "This is the United States' shame in the islands," she says. Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR hide caption

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Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR

America's 'Shame': Medicaid Funding Slashed In U.S. Territories

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