Health Care The state of health care, health insurance, new medical research, disease prevention, and drug treatments. Interviews, news, and commentary from NPR's correspondents. Subscribe to podcasts.

Health Care

A chartered jet carrying U.S. citizens being evacuated from Wuhan, China, landed at March Air Reserve Base in Riverside County, Calif., on Wednesday. The passengers are now under a quarantine, the CDC announced Friday. Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP

Health Care Issues Motivate Iowa Voters To Turn Out For Caucuses

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/801496449/801496450" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Under the law, Medicare is mandated each year to punish the 25% of general care hospitals that have the highest rates of patient safety issues. The assessment is based on rates of infections, blood clots, sepsis cases, bedsores, hip fractures and other complications that occur in hospitals and might have been prevented. Morsa Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Morsa Images/Getty Images

Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, speaks at a news conference Tuesday at the Department of Health and Human Services. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Joshua Bates, a technical recruiter for a staffing firm, who lives in Charlotte, N.C., was "balance billed" by an out-of-network hospital after an emergency appendectomy. Logan Cyrus for KHN hide caption

toggle caption
Logan Cyrus for KHN

A $41,212 Surgery Bill Compounded A Patient's Appendicitis Pain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/800870904/800938123" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Overall, U.S. health spending is more than twice the average of other Western nations, and it's not just a matter of high drug prices. No wonder voters list health and the high price of care as one of their major election concerns as they head to the polls. YinYang/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
YinYang/Getty Images

Medicaid Expansion Costs Hit New York — And Other States Are Watching

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/799358623/799358625" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Roughly 1 in 10 infants were born prematurely in the U.S. in 2018, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The drug Makena is widely prescribed to women at high risk of going into labor early, though the latest research suggests the medicine doesn't work. Luis Davilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Luis Davilla/Getty Images

Some people land in the hospital over and over. Although research suggests that giving those patients extra follow-up care from nurses and social workers won't reduce those extra hospital visits, some hospitals say the approach still saves them money in the long run. Oivind Hovland/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Oivind Hovland/Ikon Images/Getty Images
Maria Fabrizio for WPLN

Patients Want To Die At Home, But Home Hospice Care Can Be Tough On Families

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/789958067/798088868" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Generics may not have the same cost-lowering power for specialty medicines, such as multiple sclerosis drugs, researchers find. That's true especially when other brand-name drugs are approved to treat a given disease before the first generic is approved. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Norm Ciha says he lost his bedding, clothes and the medicine he'd been prescribed to treat hepatitis C during a sweep of his camp outside an Ikea in Emeryville, Calif., in November 2018. Anna Maria Barry-Jester/Kaiser Health News hide caption

toggle caption
Anna Maria Barry-Jester/Kaiser Health News
Katie Edwards/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Reduce Health Costs By Nurturing The Sickest? A Much-Touted Idea Disappoints

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/794063152/794704516" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Student demonstrators cheered in 2015 outside the Supreme Court after learning that the high court had upheld the Affordable Care Act as law of the land. But Republican foes of the federal health law are still working to have it struck down. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jacquelyn Martin/AP