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Demonstrators rallied in Sacramento in May for Medi-Cal expansion to undocumented Californians. When the state's budget was finalized, only young adults up to age 26 were authorized to be included in the expansion. Gov. Gavin Newsom says that's an important first step. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Young Undocumented Californians Cheer Promise Of Health Benefits

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Supplies sit on a check-in desk at a model of a hypothetical injection site in San Francisco, pictured here in September 2018. Local leaders from San Francisco are among a dozen local officials urging a federal court to allow an effort to open a supervised injection site in Philadelphia. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

President Trump signed an executive order Wednesday proposing to change how kidney disease is treated in the United States. It encourages in-home dialysis and more kidney donations. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Trump Administration Announces Plans To Shake Up The Kidney Care Industry

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For 25 years, the federal Violence Against Women Act has required any state that wants to be eligible for certain federal grants to certify that the state covers the cost of medical forensic exams for people who have been sexually assaulted. Ann Hermes/The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images hide caption

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Ann Hermes/The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images

Gov. Gavin Newsom (left) talks with members of a Diabetes Talking Circle during his visit to the Sacramento Native American Health Center in Sacramento, Calif., on Tuesday. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

President Trump talks about drug prices during a visit to the Department of Health and Human Services in Washington, D.C., in October. A federal judge on Monday blocked a major White House initiative on prescription drug costs, saying the Trump administration lacked the legal authority to require drugmakers to disclose their prices in TV ads. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Demonstrators from Doctors for America marched in support of the Affordable Care Act outside the U.S. Supreme Court in March 2015. Now, another case aims to undo the federal health law: Texas v. United States could land in front of the Supreme Court ahead of the 2020 election. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

From 2012 through 2016, federal health inspectors cited 87% of U.S. hospices for deficiencies. And 20% had lapses serious enough to endanger patients, according to two new reports from the HHS Inspector General's Office. sturti/Getty Images hide caption

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HHS Inspector General Finds Serious Flaws In 20% Of U.S. Hospice Programs

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Travis Rieder, author of In Pain: A Bioethicist's Personal Struggle With Opioids, says none of the doctors who prescribed opioids for his waves of "fiery" or "electrical" pain taught him how to safely taper his use of the drugs when he wanted to quit. Stockbyte/Getty Images hide caption

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Motorcycle Crash Shows Bioethicist The Dark Side Of Quitting Opioids Alone

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A decade ago, it seemed inevitable that every newborn would get a complete gene scan. But there are technical challenges and practical concerns. Brooke Pennington/Getty Images hide caption

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The Promises And Pitfalls Of Gene Sequencing For Newborns

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After a difficult time in her life, Jill Hill knew she needed therapy. But it was hard to get the help she needed in the rural town she lives in, Grass Valley, Calif., until she found a local telehealth program. Salgu Wissmath for NPR hide caption

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Salgu Wissmath for NPR

With Rural Health Care Stretched Thin, More Patients Turn To Telehealth

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Physicians complain that there's not yet a standard drug-pricing tool available to them that includes the range of medicine prices each of their patients might face — one that takes into account their particular pharmacy choice and health insurance plan. Exdez/Getty Images hide caption

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R. Alan Pritchard, one of two attorneys for Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare, heads into Shelby County General Sessions Court Wednesday in Memphis. He asked the court to drop more than two dozen cases as the hospital reviews its collection policies. Andrea Morales for MLK50 hide caption

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Andrea Morales for MLK50

Alison Beyea of ACLU of Maine speaks during an abortion-rights rally at Congress Square Park in Portland, Maine, in May. Democrats elected last November have pushed through two laws that expand access to abortion in the state. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Newly Blue, Maine Expands Access To Abortion

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A Trump administration rule has been delayed by courts. It was intended to protect health care workers who refuse to be involved in procedures they object to for moral or religious reasons. thelinke/Getty Images hide caption

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A 5ml dose of liquid oxycodone, an opioid pain relief medication, sits on a table in Washington, D.C., March 29, 2019. During the opioid epidemic, roughly 218,000 Americans have died from overdoses tied to prescription pain pills, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. EVA HAMBACH/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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EVA HAMBACH/AFP/Getty Images

When the cancer clinic at Mercy Hospital Fort Scott closed in January, Karen Endicott-Coyan and other cancer patients had to continue their treatments out of town. Christopher Smith for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Christopher Smith for Kaiser Health News

Have Cancer, Must Travel: Patients Left In Lurch After Town's Hospital Closes

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An employee at a Methodist University Hospital is being sued by her employer for unpaid medical bills incurred before they hired her. Andrea Morales for MLK50 hide caption

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Andrea Morales for MLK50

A Tennessee Hospital Sues Its Own Employees When They Can't Pay Their Medical Bills

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During one of his visits to the needle exchange van in Miami, Arrow was referred to inpatient drug treatment. Here, he displays keyrings marking milestones of his sobriety. Sammy Mack/WLRN hide caption

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Key Florida Republicans Now Say Yes To Clean Needles For Drug Users

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