50 Years Ago, A Network Of Clergy Helped Women Seeking Abortion

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Health Care Industry Drives Job Growth At The Expense Of Efficiency

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In a news conference with Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos in the White House on Thursday, President Trump said the Affordable Care Act "is collapsing." Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

The Maine Legislature established a high-risk pool for insuring patients with expensive medical conditions, partly funded with a surcharge on all policyholders in the state. J. Stephen Conn/Flickr hide caption

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J. Stephen Conn/Flickr

At the turn of the 20th century, when access to professional care was spotty, many cookbooks served up recipes for the sick — some (brandy) more appealing than others (toast water). Even the Joy Of Cooking included sickbed recipes up through the 1943 edition. George Marks/Getty Images hide caption

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George Marks/Getty Images

Tapping into millennials' compassion and activism might be the best way to motivate them to buy health coverage, says Aditi Juneja, a New York University law student. Ashley Pridmore/Courtesy of Youth Radio hide caption

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Ashley Pridmore/Courtesy of Youth Radio

Texas State Capitol in Austin. Nicolas Henderson/Flickr hide caption

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Nicolas Henderson/Flickr

Texas Wants To Set Its Own Rules For Federal Family Planning Funds

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The three candidates, from left, Republican Greg Gianforte, Democrat Rob Quist and Libertarian Mark Wicks, who are vying to fill Montana's only congressional seat. Bobby Caina Calvan/AP hide caption

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Bobby Caina Calvan/AP

Candidates Confront GOP Health Care Bill In Montana Special Election

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A test strip designed to help doctors check a patient's urine for fentanyl is being distributed in the Bronx to encourage users of heroin or other opioids to check what's in their syringe before they inject. Mary Harris/WNYC hide caption

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Mary Harris/WNYC

An Experiment Helps Heroin Users Test Their Street Drugs For Fentanyl

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President Trump celebrated House passage of legislation to roll back the Affordable Care Act in the Rose Garden of the White House on May 4. NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto via Getty Images

There are many reasons someone could end up having a lapse in health insurance. They might need to move closer to a caregiver or treatment center, for example, and consequently have to quit their job — and lose their insurance. Portra Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Portra Images/Getty Images

Psychologist Phil Tetlock thinks the parable of the fox and the hedgehog represents two different cognitive styles. "The hedgehogs are more the big idea people, more decisive," while the foxes are more accepting of nuance, more open to using different approaches with different problems. Renee Klahr hide caption

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Renee Klahr

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is flanked by Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., (left) and Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn of Texas (right). They are three of the 13 senators in the health care working group. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

It's not clear how living in a segregated neighborhood affects blood pressure, but stress is one potential cause, experts say. annebaek/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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annebaek/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Leaving Segregated Neighborhoods Lowers Blacks' Blood Pressure

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Hannah Vanderkooy demonstrates the napping pod she uses at Las Cruces High School in Las Cruces, N.M. Joe Suarez for NPR hide caption

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Joe Suarez for NPR

Stressed-Out High Schoolers Advised To Try A Nap Pod

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Turns out that humans aren't the only animals that contagiously yawn. iStockphoto hide caption

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Yawning May Promote Social Bonding Even Between Dogs And Humans

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