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Health Care

Until very recently, the separate company that runs the emergency department at Nashville General Hospital was continuing to haul patients who couldn't pay medical bills into court. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

It's Not Just Hospitals That Are Quick To Sue Patients Who Can't Pay

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The house that John High rents with his son in Norman, Okla., doesn't even have a windowless room he could retreat to in a tornado, he says, and he can't afford to build a a wheelchair-accessible storm shelter. Jackie Fortier/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Jackie Fortier/StateImpact Oklahoma

Many Tornado Alley Residents With Disabilities Lack Safe Options In A Storm

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The first U.S. case of COVID-19 was treated at Providence Regional Medical Center in Everett, Washington. Robin Addison, a nurse there, demonstrates how she wears a respirator helmet with a face shield intended to prevent infection. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Peggy Gibson sits in her living room with her service dog, Rocky, in West Jefferson, N.C., last November. Gibson says Rocky, a diabetic alert dog, isn't able to work well in public. Mike Belleme for NPR hide caption

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Mike Belleme for NPR

The Hope And Hype Of Diabetic Alert Dogs

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"Our guests at March Air Reserve Base are happy to see an official end today to their 14-day quarantine," Riverside University Health System - Public Health said via Facebook Tuesday. The 195 Americans are now free to leave the base. Riverside University Health System - Public Health hide caption

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Riverside University Health System - Public Health

195 Americans Released From Coronavirus Quarantine At Southern California Air Base

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The quarantined Diamond Princess cruise ship has 65 new cases of coronavirus, Japanese officials announced Monday. Here, passengers with ocean-facing rooms stand on their balconies as the ship sits at the Daikoku Pier Cruise Terminal in Yokohama, Japan. Charly Triballeau/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Charly Triballeau/AFP via Getty Images

Lebanese doctors take part in anti-government demonstrations in Beirut in November. Patrick Baz/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Baz/AFP via Getty Images

Amid Lebanon's Economic Crisis, The Country's Health Care System Is Ailing

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Officers wear protective gear as they work to remove people who tested positive for coronavirus from the cruise ship Diamond Princess. The ship is under quarantine at the Daikoku Pier Cruise Terminal in Yokohama, Japan. Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters hide caption

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Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters

James Mark (center) inside his restaurant Big King, along with cooks (from left) Oscar Lange, Emily Joslyn, Peter Kachmarsky and JC Kuvaszko. Mark employs fewer than 50 people so isn't required to provide health benefits. But it helps with staff retention, he says, and is the right thing to do. Christine Chitnis for KHN hide caption

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Christine Chitnis for KHN

Sure, you can shoot your doctor an email, or hit the urgent care clinic when you have a sore throat. But those convenient alternatives may be less likely than regular visits to a primary provider to catch symptoms that ebb and flow, yet might signal a larger health problem. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A chartered jet carrying U.S. citizens being evacuated from Wuhan, China, landed at March Air Reserve Base in Riverside County, Calif., on Wednesday. The passengers are now under a quarantine, the CDC announced Friday. Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP hide caption

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Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP

Under the law, Medicare is mandated each year to punish the 25% of general care hospitals that have the highest rates of patient safety issues. The assessment is based on rates of infections, blood clots, sepsis cases, bedsores, hip fractures and other complications that occur in hospitals and might have been prevented. Morsa Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Morsa Images/Getty Images

Until the 19th century, scientists did not understand the role of hand-washing in disease prevention. Thomas Lohnes/DDP/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Lohnes/DDP/AFP via Getty Images

Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, speaks at a news conference Tuesday at the Department of Health and Human Services. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Joshua Bates, a technical recruiter for a staffing firm, who lives in Charlotte, N.C., was "balance billed" by an out-of-network hospital after an emergency appendectomy. Logan Cyrus for KHN hide caption

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Logan Cyrus for KHN

A $41,212 Surgery Bill Compounded A Patient's Appendicitis Pain

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Overall, U.S. health spending is more than twice the average of other Western nations, and it's not just a matter of high drug prices. No wonder voters list health and the high price of care as one of their major election concerns as they head to the polls. YinYang/Getty Images hide caption

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Roughly 1 in 10 infants were born prematurely in the U.S. in 2018, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The drug Makena is widely prescribed to women at high risk of going into labor early, though the latest research suggests the medicine doesn't work. Luis Davilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Some people land in the hospital over and over. Although research suggests that giving those patients extra follow-up care from nurses and social workers won't reduce those extra hospital visits, some hospitals say the approach still saves them money in the long run. Oivind Hovland/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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