Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

The Battle Over Oil And Gas Development In Colorado

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Los Angeles Tests Whether Lighter Color Streets Will Lower The Temperature

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Greenpeace activists hang a banner from the rafters at a bank shareholders' meeting earlier this year in Zurich, calling for it to "STOP DIRTY PIPELINE DEALS!" Also on the banner are hashtags supporting Dakota Access Pipeline protesters. Michael Buholzer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Buholzer/AFP/Getty Images

Kelp plants grow on a 30-foot-long, white PVC pole suspended in the water. If this is successful, instead of just one row, there would be a whole platform, hundreds of meters across and hundreds of meters deep, full of kelp plants. Courtesy of David Ginsburg/Wrigley Institute hide caption

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Courtesy of David Ginsburg/Wrigley Institute

Scientists Hope To Farm The Biofuel Of The Future In The Pacific Ocean

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California's Forests Continue To Die After Years Of Drought

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Wade Dooley, in Albion, Iowa, uses less fertilizer than most farmers because he grows rye and alfalfa, along with corn and soybeans. "This field [of rye] has not been fertilized at all," he says. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Does 'Sustainability' Help The Environment Or Just Agriculture's Public Image?

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Mark Holohan, solar division manager at Wilson Electric, stands in his company's warehouse outside Phoenix, Ariz. Solar installers say a proposed tariff could sink their business model, while several solar manufacturers say they need shelter from an oversupply of cheap panels made overseas. Will Stone/KJZZ News hide caption

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Will Stone/KJZZ News

In Solar Trade Dispute, Will Proposed Tariffs Cost Industry Jobs?

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States Work To Help Marijuana Industry Reduce Power Costs

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Anhydrous ammonia tanks in a newly planted wheat field. Walmart has promised big cuts in emissions of greenhouse gases. To meet that goal, though, the giant retailer may have to persuade farmers to use less fertilizer. It won't be easy. TheBusman/Getty Images hide caption

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TheBusman/Getty Images

Can Anyone, Even Walmart, Stem The Heat-Trapping Flood Of Nitrogen On Farms?

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In the upper reaches of the northern state of Uttarakhand, small villages are rain- and snow-fed. As snowfall has declined, farmers are starting to plant crops in winter, when fields would usually lie fallow. Julie McCarthy/NPR hide caption

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Julie McCarthy/NPR

As India's Climate Changes, Farmers In The North Experiment With New Crops

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The Role Of Solar Eclipses In Religion

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Bike patrol volunteers give directions to visitors at Acadia National Park. The Trump administration has rolled back an Obama-era policy put in place to encourage national parks to end the sale of bottled water. Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images

Solar cells sit in the sun at the Desert Sunlight Solar Farm in Desert Center, Calif. The people who run California's electric grid expect the solar power output to be cut roughly in half during the eclipse. Marcus Yam/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Marcus Yam/LA Times via Getty Images

California Prepares For An Eclipse Of Its Solar Power

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President Trump speaks during a visit to Federal Emergency Management Agency headquarters in Washington, D.C., on Aug. 4. Michael Reynolds/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Reynolds/Getty Images

Last year, China banned the sale of commercial elephant ivory to stop poaching. That's when interest in ancient, buried woolly mammoth tusks boomed. Amos Chapple/RFE/RL hide caption

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Amos Chapple/RFE/RL

Woolly Mammoths Are Long Gone, But The Hunt For Their Ivory Tusks Lives On

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Scientists Move To Establish Wildlife Preserve At Guantanamo Bay

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The Homeland Security website Ready.gov warns that following a nuclear blast, you should wash your hair with shampoo but not use conditioner, because conditioner can bind radioactive material to your hair. Smith Collection/Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Getty Images

The wind direction from the fire in western Greenland has largely blown smoke toward the island's ice sheet and away from communities. Pierre Markuse/Flicker hide caption

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Pierre Markuse/Flicker

Greenland Is Still Burning, But The Smoke May Be The Real Problem

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