Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Environment

After the Camp Fire in November, thousands of people whose homes were destroyed were forced to seek refuge in nearby Chico, Calif. Some 700 people, some in their RVs, are still living at a Red Cross shelter at the Chico fairgrounds. The shelter is expected to close at the end of January. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

In The Aftermath Of The Camp Fire, A Slow, Simmering Crisis In Nearby Chico

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Winter is peak time for prescribed burns, deliberately set fires designed to eliminate leaves and other flammable material that could fuel a larger forest fire. But the partial government shutdown is interfering with this and other preparations for the fire season. Wayne Parry/AP hide caption

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Wayne Parry/AP

Drilling at the Conoco-Phillips Carbon location in the National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska. Judy Patrick/AP hide caption

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Judy Patrick/AP

Despite Shutdown, Trump Administration Continued Effort To Expand Alaska Oil Drilling

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People were more likely to try mealworms — such as these mealworm chocolate truffles sprinkled with coconut — when the ad focused on taste and experience, a study showed. Oliver Brachat/for NPR hide caption

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Oliver Brachat/for NPR

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is bringing staff back to keep open dozens of wildlife refuges including Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge in Comanche County, Okla., despite the government shutdown. Adam Kealoha Causey/AP hide caption

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Adam Kealoha Causey/AP

A fatberg measuring 210 ft. is blocking a sewer in the southwestern English town of Sidmouth. It will take a sewer team around eight weeks to dissect and dispose of the obstruction. South West Water/AP hide caption

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South West Water/AP

As the economy boomed, emissions rose sharply in 2018. Shipping was one source of the increase. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions Are Once Again On The Rise

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Ocean Cleanup's System 001 was towed out of the San Francisco Bay on Sept. 8, 2018. JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images

An Engineering Wunderkind's Ocean Plastics Cleanup Device Hits A Setback

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Kiyoshi Kimura, president of sushi restaurant chain Sushi Zanmai, displays a 612-pound bluefin tuna at one of his restaurants. The company he runs paid a record $3.1 million for the popular but threatened fish. Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images

The Eastern Sierra mountains near Mammoth Lakes, Calif. The town is surrounded by U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management land and, with the government shutdown, 'the landlords are absent.' Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

'An Eerie Silence' Where Federal Land Agency Workers Are Furloughed

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Between 20,000 to 30,000 people visit Yellowstone National Park each month in the winter, many to snowmobile the park's groomed roads and trails. To keep the park open during the shutdown, local hotels have teamed up with concessionaires to pay park employees to plow and groom roads, as well as to clean bathrooms. Eric Whitney/Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Eric Whitney/Montana Public Radio

Private Companies Are Paying To Keep Roads Groomed, Bathrooms Cleaned In Yellowstone

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The Camp Fire leveled homes in the Ridgewood Mobile Home Park retirement community late last year in Paradise, Calif. The state's largest utility, PG&E, may face billions in liability costs if its equipment is found to be responsible for igniting the fire. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

Devastating Wildfires Force California's Largest Utility To Plan Sale Of Gas Assets

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Collette Williams and her son SaVaughn live a few blocks from the Clairton Coke Works. Pollutants from the plant exceed local limits, and Williams believes that exacerbates her son's severe asthma. Reid R. Frazier/Allegheny Front hide caption

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Reid R. Frazier/Allegheny Front

Scientists have re-engineered photosynthesis, the foundation of life on Earth, creating genetically modified plants that grow faster and bigger. Above, scientists measure how well modified tobacco plants photosynthesize compared to unmodified plants. Haley Ahlers/RIPE Project hide caption

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Haley Ahlers/RIPE Project

Scientists Have 'Hacked Photosynthesis' In Search Of More Productive Crops

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