Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Environment

A tugboat operator secures a floating razor wire security fence during an emergency response exercise at the Kinder Morgan Inc. Westridge Marine Terminal in Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada, last September. A new expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline would significantly expand tanker traffic in the region. Darryl Dyck/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Darryl Dyck/Bloomberg via Getty Images

In California's Mojave Desert sits First Solar Inc.'s Desert Sunlight Solar Farm. California is among the states leading the decarbonization charge. Tim Rue/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Rue/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Going 'Zero Carbon' Is All The Rage. But Will It Slow Climate Change?

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Hal Herzog, a professor of psychology at Western Carolina University, says the more we attribute humanlike qualities to animals, the more ethically problematic it may be to keep them as pets. Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

Pets, Pests And Food: Our Complex, Contradictory Attitudes Toward Animals

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Anne Schauer-Gimenez (from left) Allison Pieja and Molly Morse of Mango Materials stand next to the biopolymer fermenter at a sewage treatment plant next to San Francisco Bay. The fermenter feeds bacteria the methane they need to produce a biological form of plastic. Chris Joyce/NPR hide caption

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Chris Joyce/NPR

Replacing Plastic: Can Bacteria Help Us Break The Habit?

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A coyote runs down the road in Wyoming's Yellowstone National Park. In 2018, more than 68,000 coyotes were killed in the U.S., including 5,600 just in Wyoming, under an Agriculture Department program. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

Killing Coyotes Is Not As Effective As Once Thought, Researchers Say

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The Flint Water Plant tower in Flint, Mich., where drinking water became tainted after the city switched from the Detroit system and began drawing from the Flint River in April 2014 to save money. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

A comparison of how the old and upgraded U.S. global weather forecast models predicted the "bomb cyclone" that hit the Northeast U.S. in January 2018. The old NOAA model (left) estimated a smaller amount of snowfall than what actually happened (right). The updated model (middle) was more accurate. NOAA/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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NOAA/Screenshot by NPR

F/A-18 Super Hornet is launched by a steam-powered catapult off the USS Theodore Roosevelt during naval exercises in the Gulf of Alaska. Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media hide caption

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Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media

A logger cuts a large fir tree in the Umpqua National Forest near Oakridge, Ore. Federal land managers are proposing a sweeping rule change that could expand commercial logging on Forest Service land. Don Ryan/AP hide caption

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Don Ryan/AP
Jupiterimages/Getty Images

Why Food Reformers Have Mixed Feelings About Eco-Labels

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Firefighters who work on wildland fires and prescribed burns (shown here) can be exposed to high levels of harmful smoke. Jes Burns/OPB hide caption

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Jes Burns/OPB

An engraving shows Galla Placidia (390-450), daughter of Roman Emperor Theodosius I, in captivity. New research shows that in some cases, we are drinking almost the exact same wine that Roman emperors did — our pinot noir and syrah grapes are genetic "siblings" of the ancient Roman varieties. Leemage/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Leemage/Corbis via Getty Images

Floodwaters from the Arkansas River line either side of a road in Russellville, Ark., in late May, engulfing businesses and vehicles. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

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Nathan Rott/NPR

Greta Thunberg on the TED stage. Courtesy of TED hide caption

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Courtesy of TED

Greta Thunberg: Are We Running Out Of Time To Save Our Planet?

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Bruce Friedrich on the TED Stage. Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash / TED hide caption

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Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash / TED

Bruce Friedrich: How Is Eating Meat Affecting Our Planet?

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Jennifer Wilcox on the TED Stage. Bret Hartman / TED hide caption

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Bret Hartman / TED

Jennifer Wilcox: How Can We Remove CO2 From The Atmosphere? Will We Do It In Time?

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Sean Davis on the TED Stage. Jivan West/Courtesy of TED hide caption

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Jivan West/Courtesy of TED

Sean Davis: What Can We Learn From The Global Effort To Save The Ozone Layer?

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Per Espen Stoknes on the TED Stage. Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash / TED hide caption

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Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash / TED

Per Espen Stoknes: What Holds Us Back From Facing The Threats Of Climate Change?

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Lettuce sprouts amid rows of plastic covering the ground at One Straw Farm, an organic operation north of Baltimore. Although conventional farmers also use plastic mulch, organic produce farms like One Straw rely on the material even more because they must avoid chemical weed killers, which are banned in organic farming. Lisa Elaine Held/NPR hide caption

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Lisa Elaine Held/NPR