Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Environment

Search and rescue operations near the Iraqi city of Mosul were underway after a boat sank in the Tigris River on Thursday. Authorities say dozens of people, including many children, are confirmed dead. Abdullah Rashid/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Abdullah Rashid/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

David Anderson is a property owner and builder in Paradise, Calif. He expects the housing market to eventually come back after the Camp Fire burned nearly 90 percent of the town to the ground. Marc Albert/North State Public Radio hide caption

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Marc Albert/North State Public Radio

Rebuilding Paradise, One New Home At A Time

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A railroad crossing is flooded with water from the Platte River in Plattsmouth, Neb. Record high floodwaters inundated regions of the Midwest following an intense winter storm and rapid snowmelt. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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Nati Harnik/AP

People pose for a picture among wildflowers in bloom Monday in Lake Elsinore, Calif. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

'Poppy Apocalypse': A California City Swarmed By Selfie Stick-Toting Tourists

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For certain species, a market preference for plate-sized whole fillets is driving fishermen to target smaller fish, like these juvenile Malabar snappers. That means some wild fish aren't getting the chance to reproduce before they're caught. Andre Brugger hide caption

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Andre Brugger

At Toyota's LFA Works plant in Japan, the automaker manufactures 10 Mirai hydrogen fuel cell cars a day. It has plans to ramp up production. Hiroo Saso hide caption

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Hiroo Saso

Japan Is Betting Big On The Future Of Hydrogen Cars

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Darrell Blatchley, environmentalist and director of D' Bone Collector Museum, shows plastic waste found in the stomach of a Cuvier's beaked whale near the Philippine city of Davao. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Hundreds of schoolchildren take part in a climate protest in Hong Kong Friday. So-called 'school strikes' were planned in more than 100 countries and territories, including the U.S., to protest governments' failure to act against global warming. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

Skipping School Around The World To Push For Action On Climate Change

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The U.S. used to ship about 7 million tons of plastic trash to China a year, where much of it was recycled into raw materials. Then came the Chinese crackdown of 2018. Olivia Sun/NPR hide caption

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Olivia Sun/NPR

Where Will Your Plastic Trash Go Now That China Doesn't Want It?

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Pumpjacks like this one dot the desert of southeast New Mexico, as oil and gas companies rush to develop one of the largest oil reserves in the world. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

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Nathan Rott/NPR

In Midst Of An Oil Boom, New Mexico Sets Bold New Climate Goals

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A satellite image from Wednesday morning shows a powerful storm system heading east across the U.S. The storm is expected to bring high winds, snow and rain to much of the central U.S. in the coming days. GOES-East/NOAA hide caption

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GOES-East/NOAA

An estimated 5,500 Komodo dragons live in Komodo National Park. Michael Sullivan for NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan for NPR

Amid Tourism Push, Concern Grows Over Indonesia's Komodo Dragons

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Solar panels fill a field in Provence-Alpes-Cote d'Azur, France. Panoramic Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Panoramic Images/Getty Images

It's 2050 And This Is How We Stopped Climate Change

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Diversion facilities like this one help protect endangered fish in California. Environmentalists say such protections would be weakened under a Trump administration plan to send more water to the state's farmers. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Trump Administration Shortcuts Science To Give California Farmers More Water

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