Energy Energy

FirstEnergy Asks Administration For Help To Get Customers To Pay More

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Gas is pumped into vehicles at a BP gas station in Hoboken, N.J. in 2016.The Obama administration moved to nearly double fuel-economy standards by 2025, but the EPA now is moving to weaken them. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

Taxes On Natural Gas Pipelines Can Result In Money Flow For Rural Schools

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Russian Hackers Could Have Shut Down U.S. Power Plants, Experts Say

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"Keep it in the ground" activists protesting the Bayou Bridge Pipeline on February 17, 2018 near Belle Rose, Louisiana. Travis Lux/WWNO hide caption

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Travis Lux/WWNO

'Keep It In The Ground' Activists Optimistic Despite Oil Boom

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Jim Barrett stands next to a well pad on his farm in Bradford County, Pa. He accuses Chesapeake Energy of cheating him out of royalty money. Marie Cusick/StateImpact Pennsylvania hide caption

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Marie Cusick/StateImpact Pennsylvania

Professor Eric van Oort uses this 'virtual oil rig' to do research at the University of Texas at Austin. He helps advise companies on how to improve operations. Mose Buchele/KUT hide caption

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Mose Buchele/KUT

America's Oil Boom Is Fueled By A Tech Boom

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Revenue from wind farms has helped Dewey County, Oklahoma, fund local schools and pay off a new courthouse. Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma

Tough Talk As Oklahoma's Wind Industry Becomes A Political Target

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Though Prices Aren't As High As Before, West Texas Enjoys Oil Revival

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German High Court Rules That Cities Can Ban Diesel Vehicles To Reduce Pollution

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Why Diesel-Powered Cars Are Bigger In Europe Than In The U.S.

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Erich Berger and Mari Keto have made radioactive jewels, part of their Inheritance Project, that are unwearable by humans — and remain locked in a concrete vault equipped with radiation measurement devices. Courtesy of Erich Berger hide caption

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Courtesy of Erich Berger

The offshore oil drilling platform called Gail, operated by Venoco, Inc., off the coast of Santa Barbara, Calif., in 2009. Chris Carlson/AP hide caption

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Chris Carlson/AP

California May Have A Way To Block Trump's Offshore Drilling Push

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Denver's newest skyscraper (center) followed new building codes for energy efficiency. The city wants to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 80 percent by 2050. Dan Boyce for NPR hide caption

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Dan Boyce for NPR

Despite Progress, Cities Struggle With Ambitious Climate Goals

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Jason Czapla, principal engineer for Controlled Thermal Resources, surveys the site where the company's Hell's Kitchen Plant will be built. Benjamin Purper/KVCR hide caption

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Benjamin Purper/KVCR

The Forgotten Renewable: Geothermal Energy Production Heats Up

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