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Education

The college admissions and bribery scandal revealed that some were taking advantage of a system meant to help students with disabilities. Ryan Johnson for NPR hide caption

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Ryan Johnson for NPR

Why The College Admissions Scandal Hurts Students With Disabilities

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Students attend a Ukrainian language and literature lesson at a school in the eastern Ukrainian city of Donetsk in 2016. In 2018, students in four cities across Ukraine received training to help them identify disinformation, propaganda and hate speech. Aleksey Filippov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Aleksey Filippov/AFP/Getty Images

White nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the "alt-right" clash with counter-protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia during the "Unite the Right" rally August 12, 2017. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

In the wake of the college admissions scandal that has ensnared a slew of wealthy parents, college coaches and others in the world of academia, USC has placed a hold on the accounts of students allegedly connected to the scheme. Allen J. Schaben/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Allen J. Schaben/LA Times via Getty Images
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LA Johnson/NPR

Marijuana plants grow in a marijuana cultivation facility on July 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Cannabis 101 At The University Of Connecticut

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Students at UCLA and elsewhere are not surprised at the admissions cheating scandal rocking the higher education world. They are more frustrated, and cynical. UCLA was one of the schools caught up in the scam. Megan Schellong/NPR hide caption

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Megan Schellong/NPR

Colleges Use More Than SAT Scores When Deciding Which Students To Admit

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Students at UCLA and elsewhere are not surprised at the admissions cheating scandal rocking the higher education world. They are more frustrated, and cynical. UCLA was one of the institutions caught up in the scam. Megan Schellong/NPR hide caption

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Megan Schellong/NPR

College Students See Nothing New In Admissions Scandal

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Does It Matter Where You Go To College? Some Context For The Admissions Scandal

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A composite photo shows Lori Loughlin (left) and Felicity Huffman — two actresses charged in what the Justice Department says is a massive cheating scheme that rigged admissions to elite universities. AP hide caption

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