Code Switch Race and identity, remixed.

Since no Hollywood movie with a predominantly black cast has ever had a bigger budget, there's a feeling of collective stakes Black Panther's its critical and commercial reception. Marvel/Disney/AP hide caption

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Marvel/Disney/AP
Algonquin Books

An American Marriage: Redefining The American Love Story

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Gary Lum assists his daughter, Mei Lum, with decorating the storefront window at Wing on Wo & Co. for the Lunar New Year in the Chinatown neighborhood of New York City. The family imported the unique handmade lion-head dance costume from Hong Kong nearly 50 years ago. Annie Ling for NPR hide caption

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Annie Ling for NPR

What is love? Baby don't hurt me. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Xu for NPR

In Search Of Black-On-Black Love

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Valentine's Day cards created by artist and activist Tanzila Ahmed tackle Islamophobia with snark and humor. Courtesy of Tanzila Ahmed hide caption

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Courtesy of Tanzila Ahmed

'You've Hijacked My Heart': Valentines That Fight Islamophobia With Humor

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Blood quantum was initially a system that the federal government placed onto tribes in an effort to limit their citizenship. Leigh Wells/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Leigh Wells/Getty Images/Ikon Images

So What Exactly Is 'Blood Quantum'?

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People in Philadelphia walk past a placard posted on a newsstand with a message of support for imprisoned rapper Meek Mill. Mill's imprisonment on a probation violation set off a flurry of legal appeals, criticism of the criminal justice system and rallies in the city last fall. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

One thing I know now that I didn't three years ago: If we have kids together someday, it won't be their blood that makes them Wampanoag. Purestock/Getty Images hide caption

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The Difficult Math Of Being Native American

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People in Miami, Fla., attend a 2011 job fair sponsored by the NAACP meant to lower the high rate of unemployment in the black community. Lynne Sladky/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/ASSOCIATED PRESS

People protest against President Trump in San Francisco. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

We Asked, You Answered: When Should We Call Something 'Racist'?

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"Racial impostor syndrome" is definitely a thing for many people. We hear from biracial and multi-ethnic listeners who connect with feeling "fake" or inauthentic in some part of their racial or ethnic heritage. Kristen Uroda for NPR hide caption

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Kristen Uroda for NPR

'Racial Impostor Syndrome': Here Are Your Stories

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Hundreds of people demonstrate against racism in the Brooklyn neighborhood of Bay Ridge on Martin Luther King Jr. Day on Jan. 15, 2018 in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Shalon Irving, a public health researcher who worked for the Centers for Disease Control and and Prevention who was studying the physical toll that discrimination exacts on physical health, died just a few weeks after giving birth to her daughter, Soleil. Black women are 243% more likely than white women to die during or shortly after childbirth. Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Harlan/NPR

The game Buffalo prompts players to think of people that buck stereotypes, and subliminally challenges those stereotypes in the process. Maanvi Singh for NPR hide caption

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Maanvi Singh for NPR

Fighting Bias With Board Games

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ESPN columnist Jemele Hill attends ESPN The Party on Feb. 5, 2016 in San Francisco. Robin Marchant/Getty Images hide caption

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ESPN's Jemele Hill On Race, Football And That Tweet About Trump

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Ahmed Kathrada, anti-apartheid activist and close friend of former South African President Nelson Mandela, visits the Nelson Mandela Foundations Centre of Memory in Houghton, Johannesburg. Stephane de Sakutin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A man is detained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), agents early on October 14, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Mary Hamilton, seen here with James Farmer of CORE, was a civil rights organizer who fought for the right to be addressed as "Miss" in an Alabama court and won. Duane Howell/Denver Post/Getty Images hide caption

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When 'Miss' Meant So Much More: How One Woman Fought Alabama — And Won

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