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How Scientists Are Growing Mini Brains In Petri Dishes For Experiments

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Ben Anderson collects grass samples in Western Australia. Spinifex tastes to some like salt and vinegar chips — but it's so hard and spiky that scientists say collecting samples can be painful. Courtesy of Matt Barrett hide caption

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Courtesy of Matt Barrett

Dishwashers have come a long way since this 1921 model, which was designed mainly to help minimize the drudgery of housework. But today's sleek models are also designed with water conservation in mind. Bettmann/Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Bettmann/Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

Mileha Soneji speaks at TEDxDelft 2015. TEDxDelft hide caption

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TEDxDelft

Mileha Soneji: Can Simple Innovations Improve The Lives of Parkinson's Patients?

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Myriam Sidibe on the TED Stage. Ryan Lash/TED hide caption

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Ryan Lash/TED

Myriam Sidibe: Would Fewer Children Die of Disease If They Just Washed Their Hands?

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Amos Winter's Leveraged Freedom Chair. Courtesy of GRIT hide caption

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Courtesy of GRIT

Amos Winter: How Do You Build An All-Terrain Wheelchair For The Developing World?

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Hiroshi Watanabe/Getty Images

Brain Scientists Look Beyond Opioids To Conquer Pain

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NPR intern Kevin Garcia endures the sour taste of Warheads hard candy. Why are we tempted by candy that pretends to be made of hazardous chemicals, that threatens to nuke our taste buds, or that dares us to be disgusted? Photo illustration by Josh Loock/NPR hide caption

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Photo illustration by Josh Loock/NPR

Researchers injected dye into this human neuron to reveal its shape. Allen Institute hide caption

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Allen Institute

Scientists And Surgeons Team Up To Create Virtual Human Brain Cells

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Predictably Unpredictable: Why We Don't Act Like We Should

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The collision of two neutron stars, seen in an artist's rendering, created both gravitational waves and gamma rays. Researchers used those signals to locate the event with optical telescopes. Robin Dienel/Carnegie Institution for Science hide caption

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Robin Dienel/Carnegie Institution for Science

Astronomers Strike Gravitational Gold In Colliding Neutron Stars

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Elizabeth Loftus on the TED stage James Duncan Davidson/TED hide caption

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James Duncan Davidson/TED

Elizabeth Loftus: How Can Our Memories Be Manipulated?

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A duck-billed dinosaur skeleton, which the researchers think ate crustaceans, on display in 2009 at the Venetian Resort Hotel Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

After surgeons removed a tumor from Dan Fabbio's brain, they gave him his saxophone — to see whether he'd retained his ability to play. A year after his surgery, Fabbio is back to work full time as a music teacher. YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

This Music Teacher Played His Saxophone While In Brain Surgery

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Moshe Szyf: How Do Our Experiences Rewire Our Brains And Bodies?

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We're all a confusing mixture of an array of impulses...our nature is to be context dependent on our behavior. - Robert Sapolsky TED hide caption

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TED

Robert Sapolsky: How Much Agency Do We Have Over Our Behavior?

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Brian Little on the TED stage. Ryan Lash/TED hide caption

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Ryan Lash/TED

Brian Little: Are Human Personalities Hardwired?

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Simply going up in pitch at the end of a sentence can transform a statement into a question. Lizzie Roberts/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Lizzie Roberts/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Really? Really. How Our Brains Figure Out What Words Mean Based On How They're Said

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The Eclipse Magic Cone features a black waffle cone made with coconut ash and tipped with edible gold, and an interior filled with spiced marshmallow fluff and a golden-yellow ice cream flavored with ginger and turmeric. Courtesy of Salt & Straw hide caption

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Courtesy of Salt & Straw