Brain Candy Brain Candy

Elizabeth Loftus on the TED stage James Duncan Davidson/TED hide caption

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James Duncan Davidson/TED

Elizabeth Loftus: How Can Our Memories Be Manipulated?

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A duck-billed dinosaur skeleton, which the researchers think ate crustaceans, on display in 2009 at the Venetian Resort Hotel Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

After surgeons removed a tumor from Dan Fabbio's brain, they gave him his saxophone — to see whether he'd retained his ability to play. A year after his surgery, Fabbio is back to work full time as a music teacher. YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

This Music Teacher Played His Saxophone While In Brain Surgery

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Moshe Szyf: How Do Our Experiences Rewire Our Brains And Bodies?

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We're all a confusing mixture of an array of impulses...our nature is to be context dependent on our behavior. - Robert Sapolsky TED hide caption

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TED

Robert Sapolsky: How Much Agency Do We Have Over Our Behavior?

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Brian Little on the TED stage. Ryan Lash/TED hide caption

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Ryan Lash/TED

Brian Little: Are Human Personalities Hardwired?

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Simply going up in pitch at the end of a sentence can transform a statement into a question. Lizzie Roberts/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Lizzie Roberts/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Really? Really. How Our Brains Figure Out What Words Mean Based On How They're Said

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The Eclipse Magic Cone features a black waffle cone made with coconut ash and tipped with edible gold, and an interior filled with spiced marshmallow fluff and a golden-yellow ice cream flavored with ginger and turmeric. Courtesy of Salt & Straw hide caption

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Courtesy of Salt & Straw

"It's not just about making one German astronaut happy with fresh bread," Marcu explains. "There's really a deeper meaning to bread in space." Above, a photo illustration of bread in space. NASA/ Bake in Space GmbH hide caption

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NASA/ Bake in Space GmbH

According to research from Harvard, between 10% and 40% of the kids who intend to go to college at the time of high school graduation don't actually show up in the fall. Education researchers call this phenomenon "summer melt," and it has long been a puzzling problem. S_e_P_p/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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S_e_P_p/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Why Aren't Students Showing Up For College?

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Crew members on one of the simulated Mars missions this spring included Pitchayapa Jingjit (from left), Becky Parker, Elijah Espinoza and Esteban Ramirez. Community college students and teachers in real life, the team members spent a week in the Utah desert, partly to experience the isolation and challenges of a real trip to Mars. Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR hide caption

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Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR

To Prepare For Mars Settlement, Simulated Missions Explore Utah's Desert

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Eyes come in all sizes. These belong to a domestic cat (from left), an owl and an octopus. The Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin has 56,000 specimens in its collection — including 6,000 from more exotic species. From left: Andyworks, Ralf Hettler, vicmicallef/iStockPhoto hide caption

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From left: Andyworks, Ralf Hettler, vicmicallef/iStockPhoto

'One Of A Kind' Collection Of Animal Eyeballs Aids Research On Vision Problems

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Patrick McGovern, scientific director of the Biomolecular Archaeology Project at the University of Pennsylvania Museum, delves into the early history of fermentation in his latest book. Courtesy of Alison Dunlap hide caption

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Courtesy of Alison Dunlap

From sports, to politics, to the stock market, we love to make (and hear) predictions. This week, Hidden Brain explores why the so-called experts are so often wrong, and how we can avoid the common pitfalls of telling the future. Elise Amendola/AP hide caption

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Elise Amendola/AP

Degrees of Maybe: How We Can All Make Better Predictions

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Carrie Poppy on the TEDxVienna stage. Philipp Schwarz/Philipp Schwarz hide caption

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Philipp Schwarz/Philipp Schwarz

Carrie Poppy: Can Science Reveal The Truth Behind Ghost Stories?

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Deborah Lipstadt on the TEDxSkoll stage. TEDxSkoll hide caption

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TEDxSkoll

Deborah Lipstadt: How Do You Stand Up To A Holocaust Denier?

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Jennifer Qian for NPR

Listen to the Invisibilia episode

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