Animals Animals

Animals Forced To Evacuate California Wildfires Too

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Adult female with young male coming in (without collar) to her kill. Mark Elbroch/Panthera/Science hide caption

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Mark Elbroch/Panthera/Science

Pumas Are Not Such Loners After All

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Talkin' Birds On The Galapagos Islands

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Light Pollution Can Impact Nocturnal Bird Migration

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Paris Residents Reject Mayor's Idea To Rid The City Of Pigeons

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Brewster the Brewery Cat, of The Guardian Brewing Co. in Muncie, Ind., is a husky, middle-aged, orange Creamsicle–colored feline who enjoys tuna and sleeping in cardboard boxes. Courtesy of Distillery Cats/Julia Kuo hide caption

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Courtesy of Distillery Cats/Julia Kuo

Animals, Plants Rafted Across The Pacific After Japan's 2011 Earthquake

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Guggenheim Pulls Animal Art From Upcoming Chinese Exhibition

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Lulu Garcia-Navarro found Kiko in a shelter after Hurricane Irma in Miami. "He licked my nose and it was pure love," she says. Lulu Garcia-Navarro/NPR hide caption

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Lulu Garcia-Navarro/NPR

Lost In The Storm, He Found A Place In My Family

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It Got A Little Batty At A Salt Lake City High School When Winged Visitors Arrived

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A duck-billed dinosaur skeleton, which the researchers think ate crustaceans, on display in 2009 at the Venetian Resort Hotel Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Portugal Has a Pigeon Population Problem

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Sophia Spencer and Morgan Jackson co-wrote a scientific paper on Twitter, entomology and women in science, after a tweet about Sophia's love for bugs went viral. Courtesy of Nicole Spencer hide caption

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Courtesy of Nicole Spencer

Once Teased For Her Love Of Bugs, 8-Year-Old Co-Authors Scientific Paper

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A map in Where the Animals Go shows how baboons move near the Mpala Research Centre in Kenya, as tracked by anthropologist Margaret Crofoot and her colleagues in 2012. Margaret Crofoot, University of California, Davis; Damien Farine, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology /Courtesy of Oliver Uberti hide caption

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Margaret Crofoot, University of California, Davis; Damien Farine, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology /Courtesy of Oliver Uberti

Can A Cat Be Both A Liquid And A Solid?

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Ken Catania of Vanderbilt University lets a small eel zap his arm as he holds a device he designed to measure the strength of the electric current. Ken Catania hide caption

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Ken Catania

It's Like An 'Electric-Fence Sensation,' Says Scientist Who Let An Eel Shock His Arm

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Adult Eastern hellbenders can grow up to 2 feet long and weigh around 5 pounds. They are currently endangered in several states. Pete Oxford/Minden Pictures RM/Getty Images hide caption

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Pete Oxford/Minden Pictures RM/Getty Images

VIDEO: Snot Otters Get A Second Chance In Ohio

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The organic industry is suing the government, demanding that the U.S. Department of Agriculture implement new rules that require organic egg producers to give their chickens more space to roam. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Organic Industry Sues USDA To Push For Animal Welfare Rules

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