Animals Animals

Fossils In New Zealand Reveal Penguins Used To Be Bigger

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/570387486/570387487" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A tick grasping a dinosaur feather is preserved in 99 million-year-old amber from Myanmar. Peñalver et al/Nature Communications hide caption

toggle caption
Peñalver et al/Nature Communications

Amber-Trapped Tick Suggests Ancient Bloodsuckers Feasted On Feathered Dinosaurs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/569949770/570387526" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Black-footed ferrets are the most endangered mammal in North America. Scientists in Montana are trying to save the ferrets by saving their main food source, prairie dogs. Kathryn Scott Osler/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kathryn Scott Osler/Denver Post via Getty Images

Biologists With Drones And Peanut Butter Pellets Are On A Mission To Help Ferrets

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/569468428/569716854" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Researchers found that when narwhals like these were released from a net, the animals' heart rates dropped even as they were swimming rapidly. Flip Nicklin/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Flip Nicklin/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images

Stressed-Out Narwhals Don't Know Whether To Freeze Or Flee, Scientists Find

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/569160429/569345976" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Dog Saves 2 Cats Because Dogs Are Clearly Superior Animals

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/568755999/568756000" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A peregrine falcon in Germany. A new study finds the birds are able to dive at high speeds and catch moving prey using a mathematical principle that also guides missiles. Sebastian Willnow/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sebastian Willnow/AFP/Getty Images

Rats have been a persistent problem for cities around the world. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
AFP/AFP/Getty Images

The Genetic Divide Between NYC's Uptown And Downtown Rats

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/567572989/567572990" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Artist's rendition of a family of pterosaurs, which had massive wingspans of up to 13 feet and likely ate fish with their large teeth-filled jaws. Illustrated by Zhao Chuang hide caption

toggle caption
Illustrated by Zhao Chuang

Animal Carcasses In Israel May Reveal Climate Change Clues

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/566877319/566877320" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Uproar Over Elephant Trophies Overshadows Changes To Lion Imports

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/566326438/566326439" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wild Turkeys Invade Rural California Neighborhoods

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/565599329/565599330" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Nonhuman Rights Project Advocates For Zoo Animals

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/565025405/565025406" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript