Eighth graders Cristian Munoz (left) and Clifton Steward work on their Chromebooks during a language arts class at French Middle School in Topeka, Kan. Both students were eligible to bring the devices home this summer. Scott Ritter/Courtesy of French Middle School hide caption

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Scott Ritter/Courtesy of French Middle School

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg (right) speaks with panelists at the Facebook Communities Summit on Thursday in Chicago, where he announced Facebook's mission will change to focus on the activity level of its users. From left are Lola Omolola, Erin Schatteman and Janet Sanchez, who run popular Facebook groups. Teresa Crawford/AP hide caption

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Teresa Crawford/AP

Facebook has created new tools for trying to keep terrorist content off the site. Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images

How Facebook Uses Technology To Block Terrorist-Related Content

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Uber co-founder Travis Kalanick, pictured here at a Vanity Fair summit in October 2016, resigned abruptly this week as the company's CEO after weeks of scandals about workplace culture. Mike Windle/Getty Images for Vanity Fair hide caption

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Mike Windle/Getty Images for Vanity Fair

After CEO Resignation, Is Uber Kalanick-less Or Kalanick-free?

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Eli Pariser, CEO of Upworthy, speaks onstage at during the 2014 SXSW Festival in Austin, Texas. At its peak, the site, which is founded on a mission of promoting viral and uplifting content, was reaching close to 90 million people a month. Jon Shapley/Getty Images for SXSW hide caption

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Upworthy Was One Of The Hottest Sites Ever. You Won't Believe What Happened Next

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Robots move racks of merchandise at an Amazon fulfillment center in Tracy, Calif. When a robot finds its storage unit, it glides underneath, lifts it up and then delivers it to a worker. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Online Retail Boom Means More Warehouse Workers, And Robots To Accompany Them

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Freada Kapor Klein stands on a staircase at the Kapor Center for Social Impact in Oakland, Calif. She is a high profile investor, who invested early on with Uber. She has used her voice and her money in a decades-long effort to promote more diversity in Silicon Valley. Talia Herman for NPR hide caption

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Talia Herman for NPR

The Investor Who Took On Uber, And Silicon Valley

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Binky is a new social media app where users can scroll, share and like random posts, but all the actions are meaningless. iTunes hide caption

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iTunes

Meet Binky, The Social Media App Where Nothing Matters

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Journalists at The Washington Post work in a newsroom surrounded by screens showing its website and updated reader metrics. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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At 'Washington Post,' Tech Is Increasingly Boosting Financial Performance

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An employee of Indian IT security solutions company Innefu Labs works at its offices in New Delhi. Newer fields, including artificial intelligence, will require highly advanced skills, analysts say. Sajjad Hussain/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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India's Tech Firms Face Fundamental Shift From IT To More Advanced Tech

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Notarize is one of the apps and websites that connect people to a notary who can notarize documents remotely. Courtesy of Notarize hide caption

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Courtesy of Notarize

Notaries Are Starting To Put Down The Stamp And Pick Up A Webcam

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One Uber driver is available in Muncie, Ind., at 7 p.m. on a recent weeknight. Through dozens of interviews and an informal survey, NPR found that hundreds of Uber drivers feel the company is not living up to its "Be Your Own Boss" promise. Lucas Carter for NPR hide caption

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The Faceless Boss: A Look Into The Uber Driver Workplace

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For two years, Hawkins let his app guide him around the globe, including a stop in Gortina, Slovenia. Courtesy of Max Hawkins hide caption

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Courtesy of Max Hawkins

Eager To Burst His Own Bubble, A Techie Made Apps To Randomize His Life

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It's already difficult to create distance from the technology that surrounds us, but as connectivity increases, it might become impossible to do so. Aleksandar Nakic/Getty Images hide caption

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Aleksandar Nakic/Getty Images

Inventor Thomas Edison stands in his chemistry lab in West Orange, N.J., in 1904. Thomas Edison National Historical Park/National Park Service hide caption

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Thomas Edison National Historical Park/National Park Service

Before Silicon Valley, New Jersey Reigned As Nation's Center Of Innovation

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XFR Collective member Carmel Curtis works on a VHS cartridge during an event at the Baltimore Museum of Art in March. Lorena Ramirez-Lopez/XFR Collective hide caption

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Lorena Ramirez-Lopez/XFR Collective

Videotapes Are Becoming Unwatchable As Archivists Work To Save Them

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Online sales are growing by about 15 percent each year, but states say they're not getting their fair share of taxes from e-commerce. razerbird/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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razerbird/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Massachusetts Tries Something New To Claim Taxes From Online Sales

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Artist and flipbooked.com founder Liza Tudor thumbs through "1st Steps," a flipbook of Nicole Garrens' son Zander's first steps. Tudor sent the flipbook to Garrens' husband, Roy, who's currently incarcerated in Texas. Noel Black for NPR hide caption

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Noel Black for NPR

Flipbooks Help Prisoners Stay Connected To Their Loved Ones

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AcidLabs/Getty Images/iStockphoto

For Video Soundtracks, Computers Are The New Composers

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David Giovannoni uses a reproduction of Scott's phonautograph. Giovannoni is part of the team that recovered the audio from Scott's recordings. Art Silverman/NPR hide caption

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At The Dawn Of Recorded Sound, No One Cared

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