All Tech Considered All Tech Considered

Sci-fi writer William Gibson says the best way to imagine new technologies and how they could affect society is not through current expertise but by talking to "either artists or criminals." Ron Bull/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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Ron Bull/Toronto Star via Getty Images
Jenn Liv for NPR

The Father Of The Internet Sees His Invention Reflected Back Through A 'Black Mirror'

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Automating Inequality by Virginia Eubanks Eslah Attar/NPR hide caption

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Eslah Attar/NPR

'Automating Inequality': Algorithms In Public Services Often Fail The Most Vulnerable

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This is a sample photo taken with the 1-megapixel Quanta Image Sensor. Instead of pixels, QIS chips have what researchers call "jots." Each jot can detect a single particle of light. Jiaju Ma hide caption

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Jiaju Ma

Super Sensitive Sensor Sees What You Can't

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Sam Rowe for NPR

Can Computers Learn Like Humans?

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Elizabeth and David visited each other four times for a total of 54 days, and on their most recent visit, David proposed and then bought a house for them in Wales. Courtesy of Elizabeth Schunck hide caption

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Courtesy of Elizabeth Schunck

Hear Elizabeth and David tell their love story

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In a federal indictment, Phillip Durachinsky faces numerous charges including installing malware on thousands of computers and the production of child pornography. Cuyahoga County Sheriff's Department hide caption

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Cuyahoga County Sheriff's Department

Ohio Man Charged With Putting Spyware On Thousands of Computers

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Couples now have intertwined digital lives, and so marital problems can lead to spying through specialized apps, keyboard loggers and GPS tracking technology. Roy Scott/Getty Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Getty Images

According to family lawyers, scorned spouses are increasingly turning to GPS trackers and cheap spyware apps to watch an ex. Stuart Kinlough/Getty Images hide caption

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Stuart Kinlough/Getty Images

I Know Where You've Been: Digital Spying And Divorce In The Smartphone Age

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Young women cosplay as the main characters of the mobile game Arena of Valor in Tianjin, China, in October. More than half the game's players in China are female. Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images

China's Most Popular Mobile Game Charges Into American Market

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Sean Zadig runs the threat investigations team at Oath, formerly known as Yahoo. He talked about his team's work at the Center for Long-Term Cybersecurity at the University of California, Berkeley in September. Alina Selyukh/NPR hide caption

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Alina Selyukh/NPR

Why Silicon Valley Is Hiring Ex-Federal Agents

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Initially, engineer Niniane Wang didn't want to go public with sex harassment allegations because she worried it would jeopardize her relationships with other investors. Joe Scarnici/Getty Images for Fortune hide caption

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Joe Scarnici/Getty Images for Fortune

How A Female Engineer Built A Public Case Against A Sexual Harasser In Silicon Valley

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Erica Louie, a YouTuber who goes by Miss Louie, left her corporate job to make fashion videos full time. Denise Tejada/Youth Radio hide caption

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Denise Tejada/Youth Radio

'This Is A Business Now': YouTube Stars Influence Generation Z's Fashion Tastes

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Beyoncé performs at the Grammy Awards in Los Angeles on Feb. 12. "Instead of me telling someone how good I look, I can just send them a picture of Beyoncé in a queen's outfit," Youth Radio's Robert Fisher says. Lucy Nicholson/Reuters hide caption

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Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

What This Picture Of Beyoncé Tells Us About How Generation Z Connects

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The Infiniti QX50 Crossover is displayed at the 2017 LA Auto Show in Los Angeles. The car features a new engine that shows automakers are still finding ways to improve the gasoline engine, even as electric vehicles are gaining in popularity. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

Employees work on automobile parts at a production line at the BMW factory in Shenyang, China, on Nov. 22. Twelve percent of workers in China could need to switch jobs by 2030, researchers say. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

A Google doodle from earlier this year commemorated the 100th anniversary of the Silent Parade, during which almost 10,000 African-Americans marched in New York City to protest violence against African-Americans. Google hide caption

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Google

Identity thieves can strip personal information off of public Wi-Fi and your smartphone. Rick Nease/MCT Graphics via Getty Images hide caption

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Rick Nease/MCT Graphics via Getty Images

Sidewalk Labs, a unit of Google parent Alphabet, is partnering with Toronto to redesign part of the city's eastern waterfront as a high-tech urban neighborhood. Sidewalk Labs hide caption

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Sidewalk Labs

A Google-Related Plan Brings Futuristic Vision, Privacy Concerns To Toronto

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A laptop in the Netherlands was one of hundreds of thousands infected by ransomware in May. The malware reportedly originated with the NSA. Rob Engelaar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rob Engelaar/AFP/Getty Images