All Things Considered Every weekday, All Things Considered hosts Ailsa Chang, Audie Cornish, Mary Louise Kelly and Ari Shapiro present the program's trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews, and offbeat features. Michel Martin hosts on the weekends.

All Things Considered

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All Things Considered for October 24, 2010

House Minority Leader John Boehner of Ohio holds up a copy of the GOP agenda, "A Pledge to America," last month in Virginia. Republicans are using the 21-page document as a road map to fix the economy. But if they regain control of the House next month, will they be able to keep those promises? J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

If Republicans Win, How Will They Lead?

If The Republicans Win, How Will They Lead?

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Political economist Mark Blyth defines austerity as "the common sense on how to pay for the massive increase in public debt caused by the financial crisis -- mostly through the slashing of government services." WatsonMedia presents Mark Blyth on Austerity/YouTube.com hide caption

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WatsonMedia presents Mark Blyth on Austerity/YouTube.com

Austerity: A Virtue That Could Have Us Paying Twice

Austerity: A Virtue That Could Have Us Paying Twice

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All Things Considered for October 23, 2010

Steam and smoke rise over a coal-burning power plant in Gelsenkirchen, Germany. Martin Meissner/AP hide caption

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Martin Meissner/AP

GOP Victory May Be Defeat For Climate Change Policy

GOP Victory May Be Defeat For Climate Change Policy

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Ozomatli Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images North America hide caption

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Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images North America

Ozomatli: A Band With A Message

Ozomatli: A Band With A Message

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Researchers say one reason physicists are good at poker is because their brains are particularly attuned to thinking about probability, statistics and modeling. Mikko J. Pitkanen/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Mikko J. Pitkanen/iStockphoto.com

Want To Clean Up At Poker? Study Physics

Want To Clean Up At Poker? Study Physics

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Alejandra Deheza and Benjamin Curtis of School of Seven Bells. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

School Of Seven Bells: Music From A Lucid Dream

School Of Seven Bells: Music From A Lucid Dream

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All Things Considered