Consider This from NPR Make sense of the day. Every weekday afternoon, Kelly McEvers and the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered — Ailsa Chang, Audie Cornish, Mary Louise Kelly and Ari Shapiro — help you consider the major stories of the day in less than 15 minutes, featuring the reporting and storytelling resources of NPR.

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Consider This from NPR

From NPR

Make sense of the day. Every weekday afternoon, Kelly McEvers and the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered — Ailsa Chang, Audie Cornish, Mary Louise Kelly and Ari Shapiro — help you consider the major stories of the day in less than 15 minutes, featuring the reporting and storytelling resources of NPR.

Most Recent Episodes

United States Postal Service carrier Henrietta Dixon gets into her truck to deliver mail in Philadelphia. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

What's Changing At The Postal Service, And What It Could Mean For 2020

More Americans are expected to vote by mail this year than ever before. But President Trump has called the U.S. Postal Service "a joke," and now a major GOP donor runs the organization.

What's Changing At The Postal Service, And What It Could Mean For 2020

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A traveler arriving on a train that originated in Miami gets directions from a porter, right, at Amtrak's Penn Station, Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020, in New York. Mayor Bill de Blasio is asking travelers from 34 states, including Florida where COVID-19 infection rates are high, to quarantine for 14 days after arriving in the city. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

5,000,000 Cases And Counting: The U.S. Is Still Failing To Contain The Virus

A school district in Georgia learned firsthand last week that the virus is almost impossible to contain — especially without masks and social distancing.

5,000,000 Cases And Counting: The U.S. Is Still Failing To Contain The Virus

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With TikTok, users create short videos often set to music. It's been the most-downloaded app in the U.S. during the pandemic. Jens Kalaene/Picture Alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Jens Kalaene/Picture Alliance via Getty Images

President Trump Wants To Ban TikTok. Is It Really A National Security Threat?

The app doesn't seem to collect any more data than other social media platforms. But the Trump administration argues that data could fall into the hands of the Chinese government.

President Trump Wants To Ban TikTok. Is It Really A National Security Threat?

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Clark County election worker Stean Durias scans mail ballots at the Clark County Election Department, which is serving as both a primary election ballot drop-off point and an in-person voting center amid the pandemic. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

From Online Conventions To Teen Poll Workers, The Virus Is Transforming Election 2020

States are scrambling to replace older poll workers with younger ones. The two major political parties will hold their conventions mostly online. And in one big battleground state, the pandemic is shifting the political geography.

From Online Conventions To Teen Poll Workers, The Virus Is Transforming Election 2020

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A masked patron's reflection is seen in a plexiglass partition, as other patrons chat inside Bar Tonique in New Orleans, Thursday, July 9, 2020. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

The Patchwork Pandemic Continues As New States Approach A 'Danger Point'

First New York, then the Sun Belt. Now, new states like Illinois and Mississippi are urging residents to wear masks and take the virus more seriously.

The Patchwork Pandemic Continues As New States Approach A 'Danger Point'

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A father and daughter adjust their face masks at a peaceful Black Lives Matter protest outside of the White House on June 12. Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

Americans Want To Go Back To Normal, But 'Normal' Is What Got Us Here

After rising for weeks, the rate of daily COVID-19 cases in the U.S. has started to level off. But now, just as we saw in the spring, the country is facing a spike in deaths.

Americans Want To Go Back To Normal, But 'Normal' Is What Got Us Here

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Children in a pre-school class wear masks and sit at desks spaced apart during summer school sessions in Monterey Park, California. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

The Virus Is Out Of Control, And Kids Are Headed Back To School Anyway

Millions of students are getting ready to head back to school. Some already have. NPR's Anya Kamentez reports on what happens when positive cases crop up — as they inevitably will.

The Virus Is Out Of Control, And Kids Are Headed Back To School Anyway

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Voters a polling station for a special election in Santa Clarita, California on May 12. Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images

Slow Mail, Misinformation, And The Pandemic: What Could Go Wrong On Election Day 2020

Rosa Brooks, law professor at Georgetown University, recently helped organize an experiment to game out what might happen if the winner on election night isn't immediately clear. She explains what she found.

Slow Mail, Misinformation, And The Pandemic: What Could Go Wrong On Election Day 2020

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A healthcare worker zips up a protective barrier in the Covid-19 Unit at United Memorial Medical Center in Houston on July 2. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. Has Lost Control Of The Coronavirus. What Now?

The spread of the virus exceeds our capacity to test, contact trace, and isolate those who test positive. Some public health experts say the only option that remains is a second shutdown. NPR's Rob Stein reports on what that would look like.

The U.S. Has Lost Control Of The Coronavirus. What Now?

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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Google CEO Sundar Pichai, and Apple CEO Tim Cook are sworn-in before the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law. MANDEL NGAN/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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MANDEL NGAN/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

In The Pandemic, Big Tech Is Bigger Than Ever. Should Consumers Be Worried?

The CEOs of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google faced questions today from a House subcommittee. Some lawmakers believe those companies have too much economic and political power. Former Facebook policy executive Dipayan Ghosh agrees.

In The Pandemic, Big Tech Is Bigger Than Ever. Should Consumers Be Worried?

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