It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders Sometimes you just need to talk it out—and that's exactly what host Sam Sanders does each week. Join him on Fridays for a recap of the week's news, culture and everything – plus Tuesday deep dives with artists, writers, journalists and more.

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

From NPR

Sometimes you just need to talk it out—and that's exactly what host Sam Sanders does each week. Join him on Fridays for a recap of the week's news, culture and everything – plus Tuesday deep dives with artists, writers, journalists and more.

Most Recent Episodes

A lithograph of the flood through the Conemaugh Valley of Pennsylvania, which swept residents of Johnstown and their homes down a swollen river. Over 2,000 people died in the May 31, 1889 flood. Bettmann Archive hide caption

toggle caption
Bettmann Archive

Al Roker on 'Ruthless Tide'

The longtime NBC weatherman has a new book about the most catastrophic flood in US history — the Johnstown flood of 1889, which killed more than 2,200 people in the Pennsylvania steel town. Roker says the story of that flood contains lessons about climate change, greed, American infrastructure, and the power of mother nature. Email samsanders@npr.org and tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Al Roker on 'Ruthless Tide'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/627414647/629462405" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

President Trump at a NATO summit meeting with world leaders in Brussels, Belgium on July 11. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: "New World Disorder."

Sam's shuffling through the street with NPR correspondents Ina Jaffe and Kirk Siegler this week. On the table: the President's travels and negotiations with NATO, Bett Kavanaugh, a call to a World Cup fan rooting for France, and a look at homelessness in Los Angeles and across the country. Get tickets for our live show in LA on July 30 with John Cho and Aneesh Chaganty at nprpresents.org.

Weekly Wrap: "New World Disorder."

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/628868587/628961595" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rainn Wilson and Patricia Arquette in Permanent Magnolia Pictures hide caption

toggle caption
Magnolia Pictures

Rainn Wilson On 'Permanent' And Life Post-'Office'

Wilson's latest film, 'Permanent,' is about embracing the weirdness of your own family. He also opens up about religion, struggling as a young actor in New York and — of course — 'The Office.' Email samsanders@npr.org and tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Rainn Wilson On 'Permanent' And Life Post-'Office'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/621520512/627449414" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Three-year-old Daisy, a Dachshund Terrier, is adorned with US flag colours awaiting a parade in San Gabriel, California on July 4, 2018. FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: "In The Balance."

NPR's Sarah McCammon hops in the stu' for Sam this fourth of July weekend with NPR Political Reporter Danielle Kurtzleben (@titonka) and Marketplace Senior Reporter Kimberly Adams (@KA_Marketplace). They also chat about Scott Pruitt, trade wars, and American identity. Get tickets for our live show in LA on July 30 with John Cho and Aneesh Chaganty at nprpresents.org.

Weekly Wrap: "In The Balance."

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/626597702/626670209" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Actress Amber Tamblyn is the author of the new novel, Any Man. Katie Jacobs hide caption

toggle caption
Katie Jacobs

Amber Tamblyn's New Novel Challenges Assumptions About Sexual Assault

Actress Amber Tamblyn grew up in Los Angeles and is known for roles in Joan of Arcadia and the Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants. Now, she's out with a new novel called Any Man, about a female serial rapist who targets men. She talks to Sam about the novel, her relationship with husband David Cross, and her work with the MeToo and Time's Up movements. Email samsanders@npr.org and tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Amber Tamblyn's New Novel Challenges Assumptions About Sexual Assault

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/624275707/625472708" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Progressive challenger Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez celebrates with supporters at a victory party in the Bronx on June 26, 2018 after upsetting incumbent Democratic Representative Joseph Crowly in New York City. Scott Heins/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Heins/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: "Who Are We?"

Sam is up on his feet this week with sports and entertainment journalist Audrey Cleo Yap (@audreycleo) and INTO Editor-In-Chief Zach Stafford (@ZachStafford). They talk about Anthony Kennedy, Chaka Khan, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and the US Census. Email samsanders@npr.org or tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Weekly Wrap: "Who Are We?"

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/624802892/624825505" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Actor Joe Morton plays Eli Pope in the ABC drama Scandal. He's also performing the title role in the Shakespeare Center of Los Angeles production of Henry IV. Bob D'Amico/ABC hide caption

toggle caption
Bob D'Amico/ABC

Joe Morton, From Stage To Screen And Back Again

Joe Morton is now starring in the title role of the Shakespeare Center of Los Angeles production of Henry IV, and is known for his Emmy-award winning role as Eli Pope in Scandal. He talks to Sam about dropping out of college after being told his race would "color" a production, and making it in theater, film, and television. Tickets and information on Henry IV at shakespearecenter.org.

Joe Morton, From Stage To Screen And Back Again

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/621881819/623192730" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Franciscan Action Network, Faith in Action and the DMV Congregation Network holds a prayer vigil and protest over the Trump administration's immigration policies with children wrapped in survival blankets at the US Capitol on June 21, 2018 in Washington DC. NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: "Game Of Chicken."

Sam can't believe we made it this week with Haley Byrd (@byrdinator), congressional reporter for The Weekly Standard, and Lissandra Villa (@LissandraVilla), political reporter for BuzzFeed News. They talk through the most dominant story of the week: immigration. Email samsanders@npr.org or tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Weekly Wrap: "Game Of Chicken."

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/622669600/622705756" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Niecy Nash as Desna Simms in Claws. Skip Bolen/TNT hide caption

toggle caption
Skip Bolen/TNT

Niecy Nash, Living A Dream: To Be 'Black, Fabulous, And On TV'

Best known for comedic roles in Reno 911, The Mindy Project, and HBO's Getting On, Niecy Nash stars in the TNT show Claws, a female-driven crime drama in its second season that one critic described as "Breaking Bad meets Steel Magnolias." She tells Sam how she used comedy to overcome tragedy in her personal life, and bringing a black, female anti-hero to TV. Email samsanders@npr.org or tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Niecy Nash, Living A Dream: To Be 'Black, Fabulous, And On TV'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/620120303/621145917" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Positivo by J Balvin and Michael Brun is the official song of the 2018 FIFA World Cup. In this photo, Ramin Rezaeian of Iran battles with Amine Harit of Morocco during the Russia group B match on June 15, 2018 in Saint Petersburg, Russia. Stanley Chou/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Stanley Chou/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: "It Is Written."

Sam esta bailando with Pop Culture Happy Hour host Linda Holmes (@lindaholmes) and NPR Politics Podcast host and congressional correspondent Scott Detrow (@scottdetrow). Catch up on the week's news: the World Cup, Trump administration immigration policy, and diversity in film criticism. Email the show at samsanders@npr.org and tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Weekly Wrap: "It Is Written."

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/619547117/620536779" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Back To Top