Code Switch Ever find yourself in a conversation about race and identity where you just get...stuck? Code Switch can help. We're all journalists of color, and this isn't just the work we do. It's the lives we lead. Sometimes, we'll make you laugh. Other times, you'll get uncomfortable. But we'll always be unflinchingly honest and empathetic. Come mix it up with us.
Code Switch
NPR

Code Switch

From NPR

Ever find yourself in a conversation about race and identity where you just get...stuck? Code Switch can help. We're all journalists of color, and this isn't just the work we do. It's the lives we lead. Sometimes, we'll make you laugh. Other times, you'll get uncomfortable. But we'll always be unflinchingly honest and empathetic. Come mix it up with us.More from Code Switch »

Most Recent Episodes

Rap On Trial

Olutosin Oduwole in 2017, at the Revolt music studio in Los Angeles. Yemi Oduwole/Olutosin Oduwole hide caption

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Yemi Oduwole/Olutosin Oduwole

Rap On Trial

Olutosin Oduwole was a college student and aspiring hip hop star when he was charged with "attempting to make a terrorist threat." Did public perceptions of rap music play a role? This week we're tagging in our friends at Hidden Brain to tell this story.

Rap On Trial

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Word Up
Gustavo Rezende Dos Santos/EyeEm/Getty Images

Word Up

Since 1992, the study known as "The 30 Million Word Gap" has, with unusual power, shaped the way educators, parents and policymakers think about educating poor children. NPR education correspondent Anya Kamenetz joins us to talk about what it gets right, and what it misses.

Word Up

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Code Switch's Summer Vacation

Let's be honest — wouldn't you rather be outside today? Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Code Switch's Summer Vacation

We're going on a trip, and we're taking you with us! From the peak of Mount Denali to the beaches of Queens, we're talking camp, suntans and our favorite summer jams.

Code Switch's Summer Vacation

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Immigration Nation

People protest outside of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. on June 26, 2018 — the day that the Court upheld President Trump's travel ban on travelers from five mostly Muslim countries. Mandel Ngan/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/Getty Images

Immigration Nation

Anti-immigrant sentiment is on the rise, and the prospect of mass deportation is in the news. But as much as this seems like a unique moment in history, in many ways, it's history repeating itself.

Immigration Nation

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Looking For Marriage In All The Wrong Places

Finding love online isn't as easy as it might seem. Especially for same-sex couples. Marie Bertrand/Getty Images hide caption

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Marie Bertrand/Getty Images

Looking For Marriage In All The Wrong Places

Online matchmaking sites are making it easier than ever for couples seeking an arranged marriage to meet. Well...not all couples.

Looking For Marriage In All The Wrong Places

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Twenty-First Century Blackface

Racist impersonations of black people have been used as entertainment for hundreds of years. Chaloner Woods/Getty Images hide caption

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Chaloner Woods/Getty Images

Twenty-First Century Blackface

We have one story of how blackface was alive and well on network television in Colombia until 2015.

Twenty-First Century Blackface

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What We Inherit

Sam Oozevaseuk Schimmel, 18, has grown up in both Alaska and Washington state. He is an advocate for Alaska Native youth. Kiliii Yuyan/Kiliii Yuyan for NPR hide caption

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Kiliii Yuyan/Kiliii Yuyan for NPR

What We Inherit

On this episode, the story of one family's struggle to end a toxic cycle of inter-generational trauma from forced assimilation. Getting back to their Native Alaskan cultural traditions is key.

What We Inherit

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A Thousand Ways To Kneel And Kiss The Ground

Members of the Detroit Lions take a knee during the playing of the national anthem prior to the start of the game at Ford Field on September 24, 2017 in Detroit, Michigan. Rey Del Rio/Getty Images hide caption

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Rey Del Rio/Getty Images

A Thousand Ways To Kneel And Kiss The Ground

Last week, the NFL announced a new policy to penalize players who kneel during the national anthem. The announcement drew fresh attention to the century-old tightrope that outspoken black athletes — from Floyd Patterson to Rose Robinson to Colin Kaepernick – have had to walk in order to compete and live by their principles.

A Thousand Ways To Kneel And Kiss The Ground

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Of Bloodlines and Conquistadors

Tensions have risen around Santa Fe's annual conquistador pageant, known as La Entrada. Zeke Peña hide caption

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Zeke Peña

Of Bloodlines and Conquistadors

Hispanos have lived side by side the Pueblo people for centuries—mixing cultures, identities and even bloodlines. But recently, tensions have risen among the two populations over Santa Fe's annual conquistador pageant, known as La Entrada, which celebrates the arrival of the Spanish.

Of Bloodlines and Conquistadors

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What's Black And Gray And Inked All Over?

Negrete's son Isaiah, showing off one of the many tattoos his dad inked. Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR hide caption

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Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR

What's Black And Gray And Inked All Over?

Black-and-gray tattoos have become increasingly popular over the last four decades. But many people don't realize that the style has its roots in Chicano art, Catholic imagery and "prison ingenuity." (Yes, they were called Prison-Style tattoos for a reason.) Freddy Negrete, a pioneer in the industry, started tattooing fellow inmates in the early 1970s. And while he's no longer tatting people up with guitar strings and ballpoint pens, he's still using some of the same techniques he mastered back in the day.

What's Black And Gray And Inked All Over?

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