Code Switch Ever find yourself in a conversation about race and identity where you just get...stuck? Code Switch can help. We're all journalists of color, and this isn't just the work we do. It's the lives we lead. Sometimes, we'll make you laugh. Other times, you'll get uncomfortable. But we'll always be unflinchingly honest and empathetic. Come mix it up with us.
Code Switch
NPR

Code Switch

From NPR

Ever find yourself in a conversation about race and identity where you just get...stuck? Code Switch can help. We're all journalists of color, and this isn't just the work we do. It's the lives we lead. Sometimes, we'll make you laugh. Other times, you'll get uncomfortable. But we'll always be unflinchingly honest and empathetic. Come mix it up with us.More from Code Switch »

Most Recent Episodes

Throw Some Respeck On My Name
Jet Magazine

Throw Some Respeck On My Name

It's Alabama, 1963. A black woman stands before a judge, but she refuses to acknowledge him until he addresses her by an honorific given to white women: "Miss." On this week's episode, we revisit the forgotten story of Mary Hamilton, a Freedom Rider who struck a blow against a pervasive form of disrespect.

Throw Some Respeck On My Name

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Feelings, Finances And Fetishes: Love Is A Racial Battlefield

What is love? Baby don't hurt me. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Xu for NPR

Feelings, Finances And Fetishes: Love Is A Racial Battlefield

To get y'all in the mood for Valentine's Day, we're exploring some of our juiciest listener love questions. Should your race and gender affect how much you pay into a relationship? What's the difference between a preference and a fetish? And what's the quickest way for black women to find love?

Feelings, Finances And Fetishes: Love Is A Racial Battlefield

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It's Not Just About The Blood

Noelle Garcia with her parents. Courtesy of Noelle Garcia hide caption

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Courtesy of Noelle Garcia

It's Not Just About The Blood

If you're Native American, who or what gets to define your identity? We dive into an old system intended to measure the amount of "Indian blood" a person has. We hear from two families about how they've come to understand their own Native identities and how they'll pass that on to future generations.

It's Not Just About The Blood

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The State Of Our Union Is...Uh, How Much Time You Got?

On the occasion of President Trump's first State of the Union speech, we're looking at where things stand on civil rights at the Justice Department, the state of play for the country's white nationalist fringe, and how Puerto Rico is faring as the federal government prepares to cut off its emergency aid.

The State Of Our Union Is...Uh, How Much Time You Got?

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The 'R-Word' In The Age Of Trump

People stage a protest against U.S President Donald Trump in San Francisco. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

The 'R-Word' In The Age Of Trump

When Donald Trump allegedly referred to Haiti, El Salvador and some African countries as "shitholes," we called his comments r-...rr-...really really vulgar. Why were we so afraid to call them racist?

The 'R-Word' In The Age Of Trump

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A Racial Impostor Epidemic

"Racial imposter syndrome" is definitely "a thing," for many people. Shereen and Gene hear from biracial and multi-ethnic listeners who connect with feeling "fake" or inauthentic in some part of their racial or ethnic heritage. Social scientists weigh in the need basic need for belonging. Kristen Uroda for NPR hide caption

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Kristen Uroda for NPR

A Racial Impostor Epidemic

Our episode about multi-racial people and their search for identity struck a nerve. Now we're asking, "What other stories do you want to hear?"

A Racial Impostor Epidemic

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This Racism Is Killing Me Inside

Wanda Irving holds her granddaughter, Soleil, in front of a portrait of Soleil's mother, Shalon, at her home in Sandy Springs, Ga. Wanda is raising Soleil since Shalon died of complications due to hypertension a few weeks after giving birth. Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Harlan/NPR

This Racism Is Killing Me Inside

On this weeks episode we hear the story of Shalon Irving, who passed away after giving birth to her daughter. Black women in the United States are 243 percent more likely than white women to die of pregnancy- or childbirth-related causes. There's evidence that shows this gap is caused by the "weathering" effects of racism.

This Racism Is Killing Me Inside

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Before We Give 2017 The Middle Finger, Part 2

Members of the Houston Texans kneel during the national anthem before the game at CenturyLink Field on Oct. 29, 2017 in Seattle. Jonathan Ferrey/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Ferrey/Getty Images

Before We Give 2017 The Middle Finger, Part 2

This week, Gene Demby talks with ESPN's Jemele Hill. The SportsCenter anchor discusses becoming a lightning rod in the culture wars and the flimsy partition between politics and sports. And we'll look ahead to a year of looking back: the 50th anniversaries of the tumultuous events of 1968.

Before We Give 2017 The Middle Finger, Part 2

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Before We Give 2017 The Middle Finger, Part 1

White nationalists exchange insults with counter-protesters during the "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, Va., on Aug. 12, 2017. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Before We Give 2017 The Middle Finger, Part 1

In this episode: lessons learned post-Charlottesville, the Latinas who said "me, too" before it went viral, race-and-rep wins in pop-culture and some of this year's real-life losses. You'll yell, you'll cheer, you'll shed a tear.

Black Atheists, White Santas, And A Feast For The Deceased

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Print Collector/Getty Images

Black Atheists, White Santas, And A Feast For The Deceased

We're answering your holiday race questions: Why do we still think of Santa as white? Are POCs responsible for calling-out the racism at holiday parties? How do you tell your black family you're a non-believer? And, can you resurrect a dead family tradition?

Black Atheists, White Santas, And A Feast For The Deceased

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