Code Switch Ever find yourself in a conversation about race and identity where you just get...stuck? Code Switch can help. We're all journalists of color, and this isn't just the work we do. It's the lives we lead. Sometimes, we'll make you laugh. Other times, you'll get uncomfortable. But we'll always be unflinchingly honest and empathetic. Come mix it up with us.
Code Switch
NPR

Code Switch

From NPR

Ever find yourself in a conversation about race and identity where you just get...stuck? Code Switch can help. We're all journalists of color, and this isn't just the work we do. It's the lives we lead. Sometimes, we'll make you laugh. Other times, you'll get uncomfortable. But we'll always be unflinchingly honest and empathetic. Come mix it up with us.

Most Recent Episodes

Code Switch Book Club: Summer 2019

A few of the great books that our listeners recommend for summer reading. Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR hide caption

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Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR

Code Switch Book Club: Summer 2019

Our listeners suggestions include American history, compelling fiction, a few memoirs—and Jane Austen, re-imagined with brown people.

Code Switch Book Club: Summer 2019

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E Ola Ka 'Olelo Hawai'i

Kealiʻi Clarke graduated from Ke Kula 'O Nawahiokalani'opu'u, a Hawaiian language-medium school, in 2002. Now he works there. Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR hide caption

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Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR

E Ola Ka 'Olelo Hawai'i

Every two weeks a language dies with its last speaker. That was the fate of Hawaiian, until a group of second-language learners put up a fight and declared, "E Ola Ka 'Olelo Hawai'i" (The Hawaiian Language Shall Live!!!)

E Ola Ka 'Olelo Hawai'i

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The Original 'Welfare Queen'

Linda Taylor in 1944 Puget Sound Regional Archives hide caption

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Puget Sound Regional Archives

The Original 'Welfare Queen'

It's a pernicious stereotype, but it was coined in reference to a real woman named Linda Taylor. But her misdeeds were far more numerous and darker than welfare fraud. This week: how politicians used one outlier's story to turn the public against government programs for the poor.

The Original 'Welfare Queen'

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Salt Fat Acid Race

Samin Nosrat, author of the cookbook Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat: Mastering the Elements of Good Cooking. Shereen Marisol Meraji hide caption

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Shereen Marisol Meraji

Salt Fat Acid Race

Samin Nosrat is an award-winning chef, cookbook author, and star of the Netflix series Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat. She's also an Iranian American woman trying to represent two cultures that are often perceived as being at odds with each other.

Salt Fat Acid Race

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Dispatches From The Schoolyard

English teacher Shehtaz Huq and the eighth-graders at Bronx Prep Middle School behind the winning podcast — Sssh! Periods. Elissa Nadworny hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny

Dispatches From The Schoolyard

In middle school and high school, we're figuring out how to fit in and realizing that there are things about ourselves that we can't change — whether or not we want to. This week, we're turning the mic over to student podcasters, who told us about the big issues shaping their nascent identities.

Dispatches From The Schoolyard

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Anger: The Black Woman's 'Superpower'

Serena Williams of the U.S. screams in anger after missing a return from Roberta Vinci of Italy in their semi-final match at the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York, September 11, 2015. Gary Hershorn/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Hershorn/Corbis via Getty Images

Anger: The Black Woman's 'Superpower'

A Sapphire isn't only a jewel—it's also cultural shorthand for an angry black woman. In this episode, we look at where Sapphire was born, and how the stereotype continues to haunt black women, even successful, powerful ones.

Anger: The Black Woman's 'Superpower'

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We Don't Say That

French actresses who collaborated on the book "Noire n'est pas mon metier" (Black is not my job) pose at the 71st Cannes Film Festival in 2018. Eric Gaillard/REUTERS hide caption

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Eric Gaillard/REUTERS

We Don't Say That

France is the place where for decades you weren't supposed to talk about someone's blackness, unless you said it in English. Today, we're going to meet the people who took a very French approach to change that. (Note: This story contains strong language in English and French.)

We Don't Say That

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You Say Chicano, I Say...

Chicano Park in San Diego. The park, built under a highway overpass, has become a symbol of the Chicano rights movement. It was built after residents of the surrounding Mexican-American neighborhood occupied the land in 1970 and demanded a park after officials reneged on promises to build one there. Adrian Florido/Adrian Florido hide caption

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Adrian Florido/Adrian Florido

You Say Chicano, I Say...

When members of the nation's oldest Mexican-American student organization voted to change its name, it revealed generational tensions around the past, present, and future of the Chicano movement.

You Say Chicano, I Say...

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Poets, The Life Boats
Sascha Kilmer/Getty Images

Poets, The Life Boats

April is National Poetry Month, so on this episode, we're passing the mic to a handful of talented poets — the people who narrate our lives and help us better understand our own experiences.

Poets, The Life Boats

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Can the Go-Go Go On?

Ryan-Camille Guyot holds a sign outside of the Metro PCS in protest after the store was forced to turn off it's Go-Go music due to noise complaints. The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Can the Go-Go Go On?

For more than two decades, a cellphone store in Washington, D.C. has blasted go-go music right outside of its front door. But a recent noise complaint from a resident of a new, upscale apartment building in the area brought the music to a halt — highlighting the tensions over gentrification in the nation's capital.

Can the Go-Go Go On?

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