Embedded Host Kelly McEvers takes a story from the news and goes deep. Whether that means digging into the Trump administration's past, the stories behind police shootings caught on video, or visiting a town ravaged by the opioid epidemic, Embedded takes you where the news is happening.
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Host Kelly McEvers takes a story from the news and goes deep. Whether that means digging into the Trump administration's past, the stories behind police shootings caught on video, or visiting a town ravaged by the opioid epidemic, Embedded takes you where the news is happening.

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In this Oct. 25, 2010 file photo, demonstrators hold signs during a rally in support of a campaign to remove three state Supreme Court justices who joined in a unanimous ruling legalizing gay marriage in Des Moines, Iowa. Charlie Neibergall/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Judges 2: 'Worse Than Willie Horton'

There are more than 30,000 state judges in America. And the vast, vast majority of them are not shielded from politics: They have to fight for their seats in elections. Sometimes very contentious elections, funded by millions of dollars in dark money. Is that a good idea? And what does it mean for how justice works in our country?

Judges 2: 'Worse Than Willie Horton'

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A view of the U.S. Supreme Court at dusk. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Judges 1: 'A Downward Death Spiral'

The U.S. Supreme Court does not have an army to enforce its rulings, the way the President does. It doesn't control budgets, the way Congress does. So what happens when the process to nominate and confirm judges becomes so politicized that people start to lose faith in the courts?

Judges 1: 'A Downward Death Spiral'

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Mitch McConnell delivers a speech at the Republican National Convention in 2016. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Mitch Part 5: '9 And 0'

Mitch McConnell knows that he is not popular. But, he says, the only judgment that really matters is on election day. And of the people who have challenged him, he says, "so far, there have been nine losers."

Mitch Part 5: '9 And 0'

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President Donald Trump speaks with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell as they head to an election rally in Kentucky in 2018. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Mitch Part 4: 'Not A Happy Choice'

Mitch McConnell says he never expected Donald Trump to become president. And during the campaign, he was openly critical of Trump's rhetoric. So how are these two very different men working together now? And how are they changing the country?

Mitch Part 4: 'Not A Happy Choice'

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Senator Mitch McConnell stands outside the U.S. Supreme Court with his legal team, who challenged the constitutionality of the McCain-Feingold campaign finance law. Douglas Graham/Roll Call via Getty Images hide caption

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Douglas Graham/Roll Call via Getty Images

Mitch Part 3: 'Darth Vader Has Arrived'

Mitch McConnell continues his rivalry with John McCain, and dramatically changes the role of money in American politics.

Mitch Part 3: 'Darth Vader Has Arrived'

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Mitch McConnell is one of the few politicians who have argued publicly that more money in politics is a good thing for democracy. In McConnell's view, political spending is a form of free speech. Maureen Keating/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images hide caption

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Maureen Keating/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images

Mitch Part 2: 'Money Money Money'

A lot of us don't pay much attention to money in politics. But Mitch McConnell does. And unlike most politicians, he speaks bluntly in favor of more political spending, not less. That stance led to a long battle with one Senator, who fought McConnell harder than just about anyone else.

Mitch Part 2: 'Money Money Money'

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Mitch McConnell's portrait in the Congressional Pictorial Directory of 1985, during his first year in the U.S. Senate. Congressional Pictorial Directory hide caption

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Congressional Pictorial Directory

Mitch Part 1: 'Win This Thing'

Mitch McConnell has been described as "opaque," "drab," and even "dull." He is one of the least popular - and most polarizing - politicians in the country. So how did he win eight consecutive elections? And what does it tell us about how he operates?

Mitch Part 1: 'Win This Thing'

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Coming Soon: Mitch

Coming soon from NPR's Embedded: How did Mitch McConnell become one of the most powerful people in the world? And how did he change America in the process? Episodes available beginning May 30, 2019.

Coming Soon: Mitch

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How It Ends: The Search

In 2015, Bashir Shikder returned from an overseas trip to an empty house. His wife had taken his two young children to live in the Islamic State. For the past four years he's done everything he can to try to get them back. And now that ISIS has lost all his territory, he wants to know... Where are they?

How It Ends: The Search

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At Nineveh Criminal Court in Iraq, where counter-terrorism cases against ISIS suspects are tried, women show photos of their relatives. Families visit the court to get more information about relatives, who may be accused of ties to ISIS or are being held in detention. Maya Alleruzzo/AP hide caption

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Maya Alleruzzo/AP

How It Ends: Judgment

How It Ends: Judgment

How It Ends: Judgment

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